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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm really having issues riding my bike around the city- I guess the biggest issue lies in going from a stop to moving while waiting at a light or an intersection.

If I have my clipless shoes on (I have the look system) it can be tough clipping in because the part of the pedal I clip into is always upside down- this creates quite an awkward start- not something I want to deal with while trying to go through a busy intersection.

So I picked up a set of baskets that clip into my look pedals, so that I can wear normal shoes. Well this is even worse! I can't get my freaking foot into the basket- which is also always upsides down. So I tried to take the nylon things off that cinch my foot in the basket- not much better- it's still really difficult to get my foot in.

Any advice? I live in a relatively busy area and would like to be able to ride! I don't mind that I have to stop and go all the time- but it's the getting going that's the hard part!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I've also been looking at eggbeaters, but there are so many kinds!

normal:

candy:

quattro:


It'd be nice to have a platform that would work with a normal shoe- but wouldn't the clip in part be a problem with normal shoes if I bought the candy or quattro? If you look here you can see they sit above the pedal:


Anyone know the reason for the different designs of the candy/quattro or what they should be used for? The Crank Bros site doesn't offer much in the way of help. I do see that there are various useable cleats, like this one which would make walking much easier:


Would pedals like this help?
 

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If you're having trouble with your Looks, the only solution is to get used to working with them. It will come in time (and because you do it a lot, you'll be better at it than a lot of pros who only clip in every 3-4 hours or longer!). You should be able to hit the front of the pedal (that's sticking up) with the front of the cleat, hook it, and step down and forward in a single smooth motion, but it takes time to get good at it.

Also, if you're unclipping both feet when you stop, that could be part of your problem. Try to get into the habit of leaving one foot clipped in, and that pedal positioned forward so you can just mash down and get rolling (about 2:00 if it's the drive-side pedal). That should give you enough momentum to get your other foot arranged.

Failing that, I'd go with a two-sided clipless pedal (though I'd still leave one foot clipped in). The CB Candys are a pretty good value. Make sure your shoes will take 2-bolt cleats, though--you may need a 3-bolt adapter plate, which CB makes and I use.

As to the CB Quattros, I have a lot of posts out there about them if you search.

Here's what you're asking about, though: The clip mechanism on the pedal does extend above the platform (on those and the Candys), and is uncomfortable/unstable for regular shoes, though you can ride on them in a pinch.

The purpose of the plastic surround on the Quattro cleats is (theoretically) so that they can rest on the pedal frame and spread the pressure. In my experience (over 1500 miles so far), they do not do this--they don't rest on the frame at all. All the wear on mine is from walking. Maybe they would on a shoe with a flexier sole, but not on mine.

They also do not greatly improve walkability over Look cleats. They are hard plastic, so they're slick, and they protrude almost as much as a Look cleat.

I like my Quattros just fine, but I'm not sure they're any better than a naked eggbeater when you get right down to it. More cornering clearance maybe, because the spindles are shorter, but that's it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input- I'll take a look at the quattros this weekend- there is a huge Wheel and Sprocket expo in the Milwaukee area- right now the quattros are on sale for $90- which is only a little more than the normal eggbeaters (both stainless).

Perhaps I'll take a look at speedplays as well. I'll also try riding around a bit more with the looks- I have been leaving one foot in- but I just suck at getting the other foot in and I think the eggbeaters would make my life a lot easier.
 

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I ride speedplay x-5 on my rode bike and have no problem in traffic. The x-5s are my favorite pedals.

I must admit that I had the same problem as you with my looks. The pedal was never right side up. The looks are now on the bike in the trainer and will never be on the road again. I also have to say that in my normal riding group three people have speeplay x series and one person has looks. The person with the looks is just as fast off of the light.

I also ride mtb pedals with toe clips and straps on my fixie. You can ride both sides of the mtb pedal so you can get in the toe clips after you have cleared the intersection.

TT
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info- I've also heard that the speedplays have a ton of float- which I'm not sure I'd like. I have the "floatier" look cleats right now and that feels like too much float to me...
 

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captal said:
Thanks for the input- I'll take a look at the quattros this weekend- there is a huge Wheel and Sprocket expo in the Milwaukee area- right now the quattros are on sale for $90- which is only a little more than the normal eggbeaters (both stainless).

Perhaps I'll take a look at speedplays as well. I'll also try riding around a bit more with the looks- I have been leaving one foot in- but I just suck at getting the other foot in and I think the eggbeaters would make my life a lot easier.
Just bear in mind that there still is a little learning curve getting going with the CB pedals too--you have to learn where the engagement point is on the pedal and on your shoe. I still only get it on the first try about 75% of the time, and that's after hundreds, if not thousands of times clipping in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
DoubleTap said:
Speedplay xeros have adjustable float 0 - 15 degrees. You can dial in what you like.

TT
They also have a $200 msrp price tag... perhaps if I see some for a wicked deal I'll consider it- cause that would be handy.

So are speedplays even easier to clip into than the eggbeaters?
 

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captal said:
I've also been looking at eggbeaters, but there are so many kinds!
I use Time ATAC XEs on my road and mtn bikes with my mtn bike shoes. It's double sided and fairly easy to clip in and out. I chose Time ATAC as it has small platform for quick run around with my regular shoes, and at the time, Candy was not out from eggbeaters.
 

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zeros

Many places have the cromoly zeros at about $150. I also waited till I found a deal.

I have not used eggbeaters. Sorry.

TT
 

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Another thing to consider...

When you're doing city riding, sometimes you want to wear sandals, tennies or even dress shoes. If you're wearing any of these non-cycling type shoes, Eggbeaters are simply awful. Your foot simply cannot get enough purchase on the Eggie to do any real peddling. You're always slipping off the things. Speedplays are a little better in this respect, but not a whole lot. Actually, your Look pedals are better than many in this instance...and certainly better than any mountain pedal. (The cleat engagement mechanism on a mountain pedal means your peddling surface is akin to a lumpy, concrete mattress.)

The solution? The two-sided pedals mentioned in a couple posts above. One side is a platform. The other is SPD. Need a clip? It's there. Don't want a clip? You've got that, too. I personally have the Wellgo version of these two-siders. They work just fine.
 

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I use egg beater SL's on my road bike actually...and i love them. super easy to clip in, pretty light and despite reports of it giving "hot spots" on your feet, i havent felt them--and i've ridden these with both mtb and road shoes, riding 4 hours or more. no such issues. my only gripe is that the brass cleat wears out pretty fast. i just got the new hardened brass ones...hopefully that solves that problem.

my beater commuter bike has shimano SPD mtb pedals, and those are really easy to clip in too. very inexpensive, and cleats last ages.
 

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In the city, its all about the Track Stand

its really easy to learn. (depending on your pedals you might want to set them really lose so you don't look like a total gomer when you fall from a stand still)

quick how-to tips...

its all about the front brake here. Strong foot forward, light pressure on the pedal. You want to counter that force with the front brake. Effectivaly you create somwhat a rocking motion between the two. Turn the front wheel to apose the force as well and to adjust as you lean.

Its by far easier on a slight uphill then down.

Practice at every stop. Make a game of it. Solo game of foot down. (if you don't know that game you play on the road too much and need to get dirty)

Eventualy you should be able to do it without much brake and even in heavy wind.

nothing like being able to trackstand, whip out the phone for a quick conversation, repocket it and bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
So I went and found a park and practiced... not that easy- I bit it quite a few times and got my bike all dirty :)

I can get it moving really slow, but it's hard to keep it stopped- I'm still having problems getting the looks to clip in too- and riding in city traffic it just kinda sucks when I'm making a left turn onto a street and I can't get my freaking right foot in. I'll be at the bike expo this weekend and maybe there will be a good deal on those quatros or the speedplays.
 
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