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Do you think a variance of 1/64" inch / .4mm difference in cleat placement is signifi

  • 1. Yes

    Votes: 9 15.0%
  • 2. No

    Votes: 51 85.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Prior to sending off the DMT shoes for warranty replacement, I took the measurements for cleat placement and set those into an identical pair of shoes. The warranty shoes came in yesterday and both pairs are now set-up. One pair however is slightly different on one cleat. As an academic question:

Do you think a variance of 1/64" inch / .4mm difference in cleat placement is significant?
 

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:cool: Not unless the angle to disengage the cleats from the pedals is different. :thumbsup:
 

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You're kidding, right?

Wearing a different pair of socks will move your feet more than that. The play in any clipless pedal system exceeds that. You feet move inside your shoes more than that with every pedal stroke.
 

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Adventure Seeker
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I think you answered your own question with that reply. The only way I could see it being significant is, if your cleat is right on the brink of causing injury, and that movement could push it over the edge.
 

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Apparently there are a couple people that cannot sleep with a pea under the matress. :)

There is no way I could get cleats within 1/64th except by dumb luck.
 

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Shoes are simply not made to that degree of accuracy, and neither are human feet. Doesn't matter what your measuring baseline is, 1/64" is a tiny sliver deep inside the wide bracket of shoe- and and foot variations. Forget it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Pretty much as I initially thought. Socks alone will take up the difference. ;) I marked a location point on the base plates and took measurements from there. Then that is presuming the manufacturing technology is holding tolerances. I'm sure there is a fair amount of latitude in these and I'm not super obsessed to chase it down. ;)

I used one of those machinist rulers with graduations in 1/32", 1.64", 1/50" and 1/100" scales. That alone is borderline OCD. :p
 

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Captain Obvious
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measure twice, cut once.
 

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Kuma601 said:
...presuming the manufacturing technology is holding tolerances..../QUOTE]

That's an assumption I would never even consider making - that the manufacturing of a non-machined part, i.e. a shoe, would be within anything close to 1/64" or that they would even consider that sort of precision to be important. Because fit cannot possibly be affected by that for a human foot. We aren't assembling matched parts here (foot+shoe). I doubt their shoe design is intended to be anywhere near that precise and the manufacturing process is unlikely to be designed to be that precise... and if any human steps are involved in assembly, most likely couldn't be anyway.
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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1/64 inch difference doesn't matter as long as the soles aren't carbon fiber. If they are they'll suddenly burst into flames while you're riding. Problem is...you'll never know exactly when it'll happen.
 

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A few years ago I had bought some new shoes and I was experimenting with my cleat position. Midway through my ride I would stop at a park and refill by bottles and mess with my cleats. I must have got preoccupied as I had the cleat on my right shoe pushed back and the cleat on my left shoe dead centered. I did not notice a diff at all.
 

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tomk96 said:
measure twice, cut once.
I don't see how that applies here, since you can keep loosening the screws and adjusting as many times as you want.

Now, back in the day, when cleats were nailed to wooden soles, you had to get it right the first time. Measure twice, nail once.
 

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JCavilia said:
Now, back in the day, when cleats were nailed to wooden soles, you had to get it right the first time. Measure twice, nail once.
Absolutely. But you did have a fairly good guide—a two-hour ride without cleats. During that ride, the rear edge of the pedal would leave a mark on the sole of your shoe. Since the foot was allowed to float freely during that ride, that mark showed you where the cleat slot needed to go. Some float was provided by the flexible uppers of those classic (and very light) shoes.
 

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What Would Google Do.
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Im not even going to entertain you with a reply.
But since you took 30 seconds off my life reading yours, I thank you for returning the favour and reading mine :crazy:
 

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Has anybody done the RAD Fit Kit Cleat Adjustment thing? I did it, but seems like my other pair of shoes were better adjusted when I did it myself. I can't figure out why.
 
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