Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
what is considered proper cleat position? Mine used to be pretty centered on the availible patterns (specialized shoe) but i recently moved them up so they are closer to the ball of my feet, because i feel i get more effeciency and power. Am i wrong? Should i move them back? Whats normal here?
 

·
Steaming piles of opinion
Joined
·
10,503 Posts
CC09 said:
what is considered proper cleat position? Mine used to be pretty centered on the availible patterns (specialized shoe) but i recently moved them up so they are closer to the ball of my feet, because i feel i get more effeciency and power. Am i wrong? Should i move them back? Whats normal here?
They're adjustable for a reason; there's no such thing as proper position. That is, what's good for you and the way you're built might just kill me, and vice versa.

Theories tend to move them back and forth every so often. Seems like the current trend is more 'back'. By moving them forward, you increase the work you are asking the calves to do. My calves aren't as strong as my quads (relatively speaking), so it's a bad idea for me to have them too far forward. If you've got big calves, maybe it's not so much a bad idea.

Another problem associated with forward cleat position can be 'hotfoot', or that sensation that the cleat is pushing up through the sole of the shoe. Of course flexy shoes can cause this, and forward positioning makes it worse. But the situation can exist even with high-end, dead-solid carbon soles. Moving the cleat forward tends to make the toes start to do some of the pushing, particularly the middle toes that are hinged somewhat behind what most folks think of as the 'ball' of the foot (the joint that heads towards the big toe.) Since they aren't made for that sort of continuous exertion, they start to cramp and complain, and their flexion tendons become inflamed. The problem is made worse if folks looking for width buy shoes that are too long, because that tends to put the curve of the sole too far forward, making the toes work all the more.

It also matters somewhat if you pedal toes-up or toes-down, as that changes the relative position of your feet to the spindle. As a general rule, the spindle should run underneath the second and third toes 'ball' joint for the way you fit your shoes and your pedaling style. As you pedal, your toes should be relaxed. When you weight the pedals (as when going over a bump) you should feel balanced, not as if you're falling off the spindles to either the heel or toe.

At least that's the advice that I most commonly hear, and has worked well for me for more years than I care to count.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top