Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a new pair of Mavic Huez road shoes. As I prepare to attach my Look Keo cleats to them I have a question that has come to mind every time I put new cleats on any carbon soled shoes. That question is how tight do you tighten the cleat screws? The Huez in particular is a very thin carbon sole. So much so that the shoes come with special, shorter, screws. Any time I work with carbon parts I try to use my torque wrench. However in this case I don't know what torque value to torque the screws to. Any help?:??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
The instruction for the cleats say 5.5-6 Nm. I would hope that a shoe company as big as Mavic would take that into account when designing the sole for their new high end shoes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
OH. MY. GOD. It's a flipping cleat screw that tightens into metal threads. Cranks the b*tch down. If you need a torque reading for this, put the tools down, and step away from the bench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,713 Posts
OH. MY. GOD. It's a flipping cleat screw that tightens into metal threads. Cranks the b*tch down. If you need a torque reading for this, put the tools down, and step away from the bench.
Agree (not necessarily with the snark ;-). Basically, use as much force as you can apply with a screwdriver. FWIW, this is one of the places I almost always use blue Loctite. Twisting and vertical forces seem to make cleat screws especially prone to loosening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,923 Posts
I torque mine to 35in/lbs

I just bought a new pair of Mavic Huez road shoes. As I prepare to attach my Look Keo cleats to them I have a question that has come to mind every time I put new cleats on any carbon soled shoes. That question is how tight do you tighten the cleat screws? The Huez in particular is a very thin carbon sole. So much so that the shoes come with special, shorter, screws. Any time I work with carbon parts I try to use my torque wrench. However in this case I don't know what torque value to torque the screws to. Any help?:??
They have not slipped at that torque and has not damaged my carbon soles. I recheck them after the first ride or two
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Don't do what he said!!!!!!

OH. MY. GOD. It's a flipping cleat screw that tightens into metal threads. Cranks the b*tch down. If you need a torque reading for this, put the tools down, and step away from the bench.
Quite possibly the worst advice I have seen on a forum. Use the recommended torque. I saw 2 guys with $400 dollar shoes destroy them this weekend. Cracked the cleat lug. The lugs are made of cheap metal. DO NOT CRANK DOWN ON THEM!

IMG_20180422_130456.jpg IMG_20180422_130447.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,014 Posts
Quite possibly the worst advice I have seen on a forum.
the worst...?

nah, not really. you can find all kinds of questionable suggestions on the net...like the necessity of pumping tires to the rated pressure, wearing two pairs of padded shorts, unclipping both feet when stopping, running red lights on the front, etc etc...

one person's ideal solution is another's WTF...
 

·
Adorable Furry Hombre
Joined
·
30,411 Posts
yeah but this one can immediately cost someone $300-$400 for absolutely no reason.
Most shoes, those lugs are user removable and replaceable. It will only cost $5 and not $400, unless you somehow manage to overtorque and crack the sole.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
12,944 Posts
Most shoes, those lugs are user removable and replaceable. It will only cost $5 and not $400, unless you somehow manage to overtorque and crack the sole.
Costing $$ is not the primary issue here. If cleat screws sheer off, it could cause the rider to not be able to unclip and cause an accident. Ask me how I know.

Torque specs are there for a reason. Any advice to just "crank that b*tch down" is DUMB, DUMB, DUMB!

Though I have to admit, over torquing a headset is probably more dangerous in the grand scheme of things. So this may not be the WORST advice, but it runs close.
 
  • Like
Reactions: fsdogwood

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Use a Ritchey torque rated at 5nm, check again in a week. Problem solved
Good advice although even 5nm may be on the high end.

Place a dot of red nail polish where the edge of the cleat screw contacts the cleat.

That way a quick look will reveal if the fastening screw has moved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
787 Posts
This thread makes me sort of sad.

It tells me the lost art of being a truly competent DIYer among the general public is becoming even more lost. This is especially true for what I've seen at a select few (not the majority) bike shops, where people who have never worked on anything in their life, there they are saying they've been trained and are now your 'certified' bike mechanic. Uhmm, sorry, no way. No frigging way.

I grew up rebuilding all sorts of things, from Briggs & Stratton engines, to muscle engines, to model airplanes & cars, to refrigerators, to 3 channel televisions (lol), all the way to itty-bitty stuff like intricate glass pieces and/or eyeglasses. An early memory is watching my much older brother back in the late 60s tear down a Chevelle SS, both engine and transmission, with my Father approvingly looking on and supervising and me a runt just staring in awe, clutching a socket in my 5 yr old hands. As my Father used to say, there is nothing on this earth that any boy/girl/adult can't disassemble and then re-assemble, learning how it functions, operates and is put back together.

Torquing cleat screws, whether your shoe soles are carbon, plastic-reinforced and/or fiberglass?? Hmmm, given that ALL shoes are torqued into a metal screw housing, a lifetime of muscle memory and tinkering, and, well, like I said, this thread makes me kind of sad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I torque mine to 35in/lbs



They have not slipped at that torque and has not damaged my carbon soles. I recheck them after the first ride or two
Be careful, I just trashed a $400 pair of carbon soled shoes by following one of the above posts and doubt my new shoes were defective. I pulled the nut-sert out and at about 4 NM, which is about 35 In-lbs. I agree with using blue Lok-Tight but go easy on the torquing.
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
12,944 Posts
Be careful, I just trashed a $400 pair of carbon soled shoes by following one of the above posts and doubt my new shoes were defective. I pulled the nut-sert out and at about 4 NM, which is about 35 In-lbs. I agree with using blue Lok-Tight but go easy on the torquing.
If you trashed the threads at 4Nm, it sounds like your torque wrench is defective. I torque mine to around 6Nm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,596 Posts
Be careful, I just trashed a $400 pair of carbon soled shoes by following one of the above posts and doubt my new shoes were defective. I pulled the nut-sert out and at about 4 NM, which is about 35 In-lbs. I agree with using blue Lok-Tight but go easy on the torquing.
"About 4NM"? What is "about"?
What brand shoe has a cleat screw torque significantly under 4NM? Because it'd have to be significantly under 4NM in order for you to have pulled the insert out.

Either the shoe was defective, the wrench was defective, or perhaps you converted wrong and used ft-lbs.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top