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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just want to mention that no matter how many times we hear that climbing gets easier after we drop some pounds, it really becomes clear when you actually experience it.
I dropped from 187 down to 175 over the winter. I ride with one particular guy who always smokes me on the hills. On the flat or into the wind, I hold my own very well, but hills have always been my downfall.
Just dropping 12 pounds made a world of difference. I zoomed up every hill ahead of him yesterday. Now, of course, he has resolved to lose his winter weight so this doesn't happen again.
But I plan to drop 7 or 8 more, so we'll see what happens as the season goes on.
Anyway, there's nothing like positive results to make eating right seem worth it.:p
 

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Thanks for letting us know your experience. Did you notice any differences on the flats? I lost 5 pounds last fall and noticed a big difference in my jogging up steep hills. Now if only I could loose the remaining 10 extra that I carry :cryin:
 

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I just want to mention that no matter how many times we hear that climbing gets easier after we drop some pounds, it really becomes clear when you actually experience it.
I dropped from 187 down to 175 over the winter. I ride with one particular guy who always smokes me on the hills. On the flat or into the wind, I hold my own very well, but hills have always been my downfall.
Just dropping 12 pounds made a world of difference. I zoomed up every hill ahead of him yesterday. Now, of course, he has resolved to lose his winter weight so this doesn't happen again.
But I plan to drop 7 or 8 more, so we'll see what happens as the season goes on.
Anyway, there's nothing like positive results to make eating right seem worth it.:p
Greg LeMond:
"It doesn't get easier, you just go faster."

Feels great, doesn't it :D ?! Congrats to you!


When I dropped from 260lbs down to 224lbs, I didn't realize how much faster I was going until I started timing myself. The effort felt the same but it wasn't until I started comparing times when I was at 260lbs and when I was 224lbs. Started out taking 80 minutes to get to work (260lbs). I got the time down to 40 minutes (224lbs) 18 months later :D !


BTW; make the additional weight loss an even 10lbs. Your cycling performance will thank you :thumbsup: !
 

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I've never gained or lost a significant amount of weight since I'd been cycling but what really drives this point home to me is when I go grocery shopping and have to go up a hill with a backpack full of groceries (guessing it's about 20 pounds). The difference between that and when I ride the same hill without the backpack is pretty amazing. It's also shocking how much faster I am coasting down the hills with just 20ish more pounds.
 

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I've lost and kept off twenty and at 45 it's a huge difference in my life. Things just move easier.
This year is to get to 200. Hopefully I can, but in addition I have been running, riding, hiking, and walking more. I'll take 210 or mostly muscle over 200 with more fat . There is a point you can't lose a whole lot more.
Bill
 

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I'm down about 5 lbs since I started riding again (a few months)... Yes--I can feel the difference... Now I'm busy using the loss of body fat as a justification to spend $$$ on lighter components.... It's always something!! :eek:
 

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This simple concept still evades a lot of weight weenies who think that they need to spend big bucks on parts that save only grams or ounces. The most substantial mass loss and reduction in cross-sectional area comes from you.
 

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In the mid 90's I was a Cat 3 racer at 6'2" and 190 pounds. I was really good at criteriums and rolling hill type course road races. Anything with significant climbing meant I would either get dropped on the climb and try to descend my way back on or to get in a break and hit the climb before the climbers. In 94, I did the PR Bar diet and got down to 182 pounds which with my build, was skinny. I found myself with the lead group on climbs. What I felt I lost was my sprint and ability to power off the front or power a break away. I ended up at 190 again the next season and won a handful of medals at states in all three events (road, crit, TT) in both seniors and masters. These days I dream of my weight starting with a 1 again.
 

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This simple concept still evades a lot of weight weenies who think that they need to spend big bucks on parts that save only grams or ounces. The most substantial mass loss and reduction in cross-sectional area comes from you.
Amen!


Although there are some very lean riders in my area, most riders I see could lose ten pounds and not miss it.
 

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This simple concept still evades a lot of weight weenies who think that they need to spend big bucks on parts that save only grams or ounces. The most substantial mass loss and reduction in cross-sectional area comes from you.
I get what you're saying but, a true weight weenie, by definition, spends a lot of money on the lightest bits. That's not the guy who should be targeted here.

It's the 5'8" 215lb guy who thinks he'll climb 1mph faster up that 10% grade with a new carbon railed saddle 100g less than his cromo one. However, I know many guys who are 30-40 lbs too heavy who have no illusions about climbing like a pro yet like super light stuff. They have a boat load of money and spend it on cycling. I say good for them and feel bad for those who look down on them as if they themselves are judge and jury on who should be justified spending money on light parts. JMO

As for the OP, good on you man! Finding the bottom of it is really hard imo. I'm around 5'10" and 155lbs down from 165. I got as low as 148-ish but just did not have the power to make up for it. Once I gained a few pounds back I climbed much better as the power came way up...Funny I use a mirror now more than a scale to gauge where I am. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for letting us know your experience. Did you notice any differences on the flats? I lost 5 pounds last fall and noticed a big difference in my jogging up steep hills. Now if only I could loose the remaining 10 extra that I carry :cryin:
I don't feel any difference in the flat, although that has always been my strength. I'm really glad that I still go well into a headwind. I was afraid I'd lose some of that, kind of like a snowball going downhill, but so far, so good.
 

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I just want to mention that no matter how many times we hear that climbing gets easier after we drop some pounds, it really becomes clear when you actually experience it.
I dropped from 187 down to 175 over the winter. I ride with one particular guy who always smokes me on the hills. On the flat or into the wind, I hold my own very well, but hills have always been my downfall.
Just dropping 12 pounds made a world of difference. I zoomed up every hill ahead of him yesterday. Now, of course, he has resolved to lose his winter weight so this doesn't happen again.
But I plan to drop 7 or 8 more, so we'll see what happens as the season goes on.
Anyway, there's nothing like positive results to make eating right seem worth it.:p
There's nothing like good ole common sense that allows most of us to put the simple facts in place...Kudos to you!


This simple concept still evades a lot of weight weenies who think that they need to spend big bucks on parts that save only grams or ounces. The most substantial mass loss and reduction in cross-sectional area comes from you.
Most of us understand what you're saying here, Sauron....

However, some of us just can't be fixed and we're stuck! They think, if they gain a few more pounds, they can always just buy a lighter bike!

:confused:
 

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I just want to mention that no matter how many times we hear that climbing gets easier after we drop some pounds, it really becomes clear when you actually experience it.
I dropped from 187 down to 175 over the winter. I ride with one particular guy who always smokes me on the hills. On the flat or into the wind, I hold my own very well, but hills have always been my downfall.
Just dropping 12 pounds made a world of difference. I zoomed up every hill ahead of him yesterday. Now, of course, he has resolved to lose his winter weight so this doesn't happen again.
But I plan to drop 7 or 8 more, so we'll see what happens as the season goes on.
Anyway, there's nothing like positive results to make eating right seem worth it.:p
Ditto

recently dropped 5 kgs - found I was able to go up one of my semi-regular long climbs (7kms avg 5%) in the next highest gear than previously and was about 4% faster time-wise.
 

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Not to rain on your parade, but climbing never gets easier.

You just get faster.
 

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I don't feel any difference in the flat, although that has always been my strength. I'm really glad that I still go well into a headwind. I was afraid I'd lose some of that, kind of like a snowball going downhill, but so far, so good.
Just for reference that 12 lbs is good for 1.1 mph on a 6% grade at 250 watts. That means the OP can climb 7 minutes per hour faster. This assumes the OP lost zero power. If the OP was faster than that then it means his riding buddy had slowed down.
 

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Thanks for th info. I haven't been out yet, but hopefully this week Ill get a chance.

From my last year riding weight of 185lbs and over the winter I was at 195lbs. Currently just broke 170lbs, hopefully ill experience the speed on climbs.

Glad you posted this, excited.
 

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My cycling buddy has always been heavy...and at least 100#'s more than I. He started cycling before I did and could always beat me up the hills. He's also has superb bike handling skills too.
I was always afraid of hills and hated them. The last couple of years I embraced them and got better and could easily out climb him, even though I'm still not a climber.
This past fall, he got really serious about his weight loss. He's lost close to 55 pounds, mainly from working out.
Now he is scary! It's all I can do to keep with him on climbs. In his case 95% of his weight loss was from the gym.
 

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I have to agree. I've lost 10lbs and noticed my climbs have been a lot quicker. I've also increased my speed on the flats. I used to average 12-14 mph. Now i'm averaging about 18-20 miles now. I've been cycling for two months now and try to ride 100 miles or 10 hours a week.
 
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