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Depends on environmental factors, including temperature and how much ozone is in the atmosphere. Probably last longer if kept in an airtight container like a ziploc bag, in a cool, dark place.

Several years, at least.

Are you trying to decide if some old tires are still good, or considering stocking up because you found something on sale?
 

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Yes I believe that alot of professional riders will actually "age" their tires into prime riding condition. I have only seen it done with tubulars, but I don't see why it can't be done with clinchers. Now, does this "aging" make a difference? Or does it really have an effect? Well, I'll let the riders decide.
 

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Aging

samh said:
How long can a clincher tire be stored without degrading?
Typically the tread rubber on tires will get harder as they age, until they get brittle. If stored in a hot garage right above your spare freezer, a tire might be good for only a year or so. In the cool basement, possibly a decade.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
Typically the tread rubber on tires will get harder as they age, until they get brittle. If stored in a hot garage right above your spare freezer, a tire might be good for only a year or so. In the cool basement, possibly a decade.
Yep, the waxes and oils present in the rubber compound "bloom" out to the surface. This will increase the hardness slightly, decrease the hysterisis, and reduce the coefficient of friction.

Give me a brand new tire any day. I'd rather have a tire that takes 1 more watt to roll than one that breaks free on the first slick corner.
 

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Being careful

bholwell said:
Yep, the waxes and oils present in the rubber compound "bloom" out to the surface. This will increase the hardness slightly, decrease the hysterisis, and reduce the coefficient of friction.

Give me a brand new tire any day. I'd rather have a tire that takes 1 more watt to roll than one that breaks free on the first slick corner.
Actually, a brand new tire often has mold release agent on the rubber surface, sometimes making them pretty slippery. A new tire on a ride/race with hard cornering can be sketchy.

Tires harden with age due to oxidation of the rubber. Any compounds that bloom to the surface will wear off quickly, and behave just like the mold release agent.
 
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