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How many time have you fallen with clipless pedals? Today was my 3rd time out with them and second time falling. This time I fell infront of a big crowd and some professional bikers. Went ridding in Va and decided to jump over to D.C. to watch this crit race going on, as soon as get up to the race I see all the riders coming down the road so I was hurrying to get my spot to see them and rushed alittle to much and bam went over with everyone watching. How embarassing. No harm to the bike and just alittle rash on the knee for me. So how many times have you fallen?
 

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I've only fallen once, knock on wood. I was pushing from car in a parking lot, looking down at my left pedal and failed to look up to see a curbed planter. Over I went, no one was around, no harm to no foul.
 

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A few tips:
1) At a stop light or sign, put your weight on your non-dominant leg, clip the dominant leg in. Rotate the crank/pedal to be parallel with the ground (90 degrees). Get a good strong push off your dominant leg, then while coasting clip in.
2) Do everything you can to avoid unexpected stops. That means slowing down and anticipating things like traffic, oblivious pedestrians, red lights, etc. Unclip your non-dominant foot at the bottom of your pedal stroke and lean your body weight to that side before stopping and planting firmly.

Hope that helps.
 

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My bike had Shimano campus pedals all along, but I just got my road shoe and SPD cleats three weeks ago when I decided to HTFU. I fell 4 times at first, before figuring out I should leave my dominant right leg clipped instead. Fell once more at a crowded intersection because it was stuck somehow. Accident-free for two weeks now. Still getting used to clipping in quickly once red lights turn green.
 

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knock on wood, not yet. I've been doing clipless for a few weeks now.

I am rather concerned about falling this way, so my first day out I went somewhere quiet and did a lot of stopping and stuff. I almost flopped the other day when I came to a stop sign and recognized it wasn't clear at the last minute, and as I dismounted I unclipped the uphill side first.

I find clipping back in much more annoying, although it's better now that the LBS tightened my pedal bearings a bit and so the pedal doesn't spin around freely.
 

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did i read it right in that you have Shimano pedals? From the factory they're set at the stiffest setting which makes them quite difficult to get into and out of. While you're getting you're getting used to them, I'd suggest backing down on the spring tension as far as it can go so you can clip in and out a lot easier and as you become used to them, then start to tighten 'em up a bit.

Other than that, falling down is part of the learning curve! If you're still falling over after a couple of months, then its time to be worried.
 

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on my road bike: once... trying to clip in, starting going up a steep hill.

on my MTB, where I learned clipless....I lost count.
 

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~Five times total.

Couple on my MTB w/ SPDs (first clipless pedals), the rest on my road bike w/ SPD-SL.

All but one have been of the emergency stop, couldn't get unclipped in time variety. I figure it's vastly preferable to go over on my knee/elbow at 1-3mph than to get t-boned by an oncoming car/SUV/semi, so I won't complain too much. I'm gradually getting the muscle memory wired to equate "yikes! need to stop now" w/ twist right foot and then lift up while braking.

I find the SPD-SLs to be a bit more reliable in the unclipping but more of a pain in the ass to get reclipped.
 

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i need a little bit of help please

i recently bought a pair of sette epic shoes and some cheapo wellgo pedals. Today i was adjusting the cleat to make my foot position a little more comfortable and apperantly stripped out the female end of the shoe. I didn't think i was turning the cleat bolt that tight, but apperantly i was, is there any way to fix this? I payed $100 for these shoes 5 weeks ago and pricepoint refuses to e-mail me back or give me any phone assistance. Is there anyway i can fix this without having to buy new shoes.

p.s. i actually bought these for my MTB, but bought a new Spech allez this week so i've had them on the road bike.

I though about buying some CB pedals and cleats and gluing the CB cleat bolt in since their cleats work on all their pedals. I can use the same shoe and cleat with eggbeaters for the road bike, and mallets for the MTB.
 

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I fell a few times in the mid 1990's when I first started using them, but zero times in the subsequent 15+ years. Once you're used to them you'll never go back to riding without them.

Clip out earlier than you need to. Until it's 2nd nature, click out one foot as you approach your stop. In the last 2-3 seconds before you stop your foot should be on the pedal but not clipped in.
 

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I went clipless last week with SPD-SL's and fell the first time I clipped in! I had the R unclipped, but leaned to the left and fell! No harm done; no witnesses!
I had a challenge the other day, though, that I need some advice on. I was climbing a hill and ran out of gas. HR north of 190, and stopped for a breather. I was in the middle of a 5% grade with 1/2 mile to go and discovered after I clipped my R shoe in, and pushed off, I couldn't get enough speed to clip the L one in. There were no houses with convenient driveways to circle in and I didn't want to go back down the hill I just about killed myself getting up! So I walked the bike up the hill to flat land and prayed that no other cyclists would show up!
Any suggestions for handling this? (My trainer said to not stop on the hill next time!) We are working on my endurance BTW.

Joe
 

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3 times in the first 6 months, back when I first started. All at almost-stopped speed...yes, embarrassing. It was among the reasons why I stopped riding for a short spell, I just couldn't get used to being clipped in.

Now, in my 3rd comeback to riding, I just make sure that I unclip noticeably early when I am coming to a planned stop. Like the other poster said, make sure you try to avoid unplanned stops or maneuvers. Yeah, gets a little dicey when you are going uphill and almost popped in strength :eek:

**
 

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started clipless a month ago, have about 230 miles on LOOK Keo clipless. Havn't fallen over yet. Have had some close calls, some cleats scraping hard on the concrete, but thats as close as i've gotten. Just take it slow and unclip when you sense slowing down. and don't clip in until you have enough space in front of you
 

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joesheets said:
I was in the middle of a 5% grade with 1/2 mile to go and discovered after I clipped my R shoe in, and pushed off, I couldn't get enough speed to clip the L one in. There were no houses with convenient driveways to circle in and I didn't want to go back down the hill I just about killed myself getting up! So I walked the bike up the hill to flat land and prayed that no other cyclists would show up!
Any suggestions for handling this? (My trainer said to not stop on the hill next time!) We are working on my endurance BTW.
It takes a bit of practice, but eventually starting on a hill is not a problem. If you don't get your foot to clip in immediately it's okay. Try to increase your cadence with the foot on the pedal but not clipped in. Once you're moving, lift up the unclipped foot at the bottom of it's stroke and try to clip in on the next downward power stroke. At a moderately low cadence (50-60 rpm) you'll have about 1/2 a second to flip the pedal and try to clip in. It may take several tries. With time it gets easier.
 

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laffeaux said:
It takes a bit of practice, but eventually starting on a hill is not a problem. If you don't get your foot to clip in immediately it's okay. Try to increase your cadence with the foot on the pedal but not clipped in. Once you're moving, lift up the unclipped foot at the bottom of it's stroke and try to clip in on the next downward power stroke. At a moderately low cadence (50-60 rpm) you'll have about 1/2 a second to flip the pedal and try to clip in. It may take several tries. With time it gets easier.

The main problem w clipping in is the position of the pedal and the slickness of the sole of the shoe. I will keep practicing. Is the an advantage to using two-sided pedals?

Joe
 

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I fell at the end of my first long ride in clipless pedals, coming back into town gassed and just didn't unclip far enough in advance of a stop light.

I had a half fall, half crash going around a corner where a car stopped waaaaay beyond the white line (nearly entered the intersection when I was coming down the left side of a one-way street seeking to make a left turn at said intersection) so I had to miss my apex, hit a pothole which forced me really wide, and ended up having to choose between the back end of a parked car or a big curb. I unclipped in time, set my bike down and hopped over the curb and did a little commando roll. I know the person in the offending car saw me because I think their eyes were as wide as mine when we locked gazes as I was having my "OH S**T" moment, but they just drove away. Anyway, long story short the unclipping was pretty much instinctive, it gets easier as you go along.

All told I think I've hit the road three times, only one of them being a low-speed, failure-to-unclip disaster.
 
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