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WHat are good wheels for the heavyweight? I need Campagnolo compatibility and a realistic price, say up to $400.

Thanks.
 

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Sorry...have to chime in on this one

ergott said:
36 hole Chorus
double butted spokes
Deep V/CXP 33 rims (or similar)
There is no doubt this is a strong wheelset. It also weighs as much as a tank. I am 6'5", 240lbs, and have ridden a LOT of wheels. Generally, the first question is how big are you and what kind of riding will you be doing. If you live in a hilly area (like me), the DeepVs are a killer and will wear you out. They are great for Tri riding or the flats, but not climbing. Also, 36 spoke wheels are definitely stronger, but unless you are REALLY hard on equipment 32 spokes in the rear should be fine. Definitely 32 spokes in front is ok (and depending on size maybe even 28).

Obviously you will need a stronger wheel than a flyweight, so a little higher profile rim (CXP 33s, Aeroheads, etc.) and higher spoke count is in order. Also, you will want to use a heavier spoke than the flyweight, and their are plenty of options here.

Search the forums and the reviews, and you will see a lot of posts for wheels that work well for clydesdales. I prefer handbuilts, and my current wheels are 32 spoke DT240s hubs and Velocity Aerohead rims. 32 spoke front and rear, with the front being 2x. The rear Velocity rim is also OC, which makes it nice and strong as the NDS spokes are more evenly tensioned. I also have several sets of Mavic Open Pros 32h laced to Campy and Shimano hubs. Very bulletproof and easy to service.

However, I have also ridden many pre-builts. The best of these were the Velomax wheels, like the Orions and the Circuits. Both are very strong and durable. You will see a lot of rave reviews by clydesdales on these wheels.

Bottom line...stay away from "stupid light" wheels, but you also don't need to have wheels built like the HED Stalingrads on the April Fools day promo ad. Give Mike Garcia a call at www.oddsandendos.com. He built my last wheels and they are terrific.
 

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Campy Chorus with Mavic open pro's 32 hole. Unless you're extremely tough on equipment, or weigh 285+, these should be trouble free.
 

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cthomas said:
Obviously you will need a stronger wheel than a flyweight, so a little higher profile rim (CXP 33s, Aeroheads, etc.) and higher spoke count is in order. Also, you will want to use a heavier spoke than the flyweight, and their are plenty of options here.
Aeroheads are definitely not "higher" profile (19mm)... and CXP 33s really aren't either (23mm). Deep Vs are 30mm.

It is better to use more light butted spokes than fewer heavier ones. The stiffness of the rim is a major factor in the magnitude of cyclic stress on the spokes, and deep rims are much stiffer than shallow ones.

It is silly for somebody who weighs 240 lbs to worry about saving 100g on a rim. We are talking about a speed penalty of ~0.1% here *only* on a very steep climb... in all other conditions the Deep V would be faster... and it is more durable.

I think ergott was pretty close to the mark given the amount of info given. I'd guess the OP is not a racer... and would probably rather have some trouble free wheels rather than the lightest thing he could get away with. Chorus hubs, Deep V or other strong deep rim, 36 butted spokes on the rear (2.0/1.8 drive, 2.0/1.5 non drive)... maybe 32 (2.0/1.5) on the front. Very important... make sure to choose a good builder.
 

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rruff said:
Aeroheads are definitely not "higher" profile (19mm)... and CXP 33s really aren't either (23mm). Deep Vs are 30mm.

It is silly for somebody who weighs 240 lbs to worry about saving 100g on a rim. We are talking about a speed penalty of ~0.1% here *only* on a very steep climb... in all other conditions the Deep V would be faster... and it is more durable.
Eggzactly. For all the difference that wheels make on climbs, the only thing that is going to make a really noticeable difference is an underinflated or flat tire..............or maybe studded tires on a screaming descent on pavement......
 

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At the risk of continuing this thread...

alienator said:
Eggzactly. For all the difference that wheels make on climbs, the only thing that is going to make a really noticeable difference is an underinflated or flat tire..............or maybe studded tires on a screaming descent on pavement......
Agreed on the 240lbs comment. Weight savings is not my highest priority on the bike, given that at my "lightest" I am still 225. However, I still disagree with the concept that the automatic wheelset for anyone over 180lbs is 36 hole Velocity Deep-Vs.
 

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cthomas said:
Agreed on the 240lbs comment. Weight savings is not my highest priority on the bike, given that at my "lightest" I am still 225. However, I still disagree with the concept that the automatic wheelset for anyone over 180lbs is 36 hole Velocity Deep-Vs.
I'm 175 and ride Deep V (actually the Pro Elite tubular version). I do not recommend the rims strictly because he is a clydesdale. I recommend the rims because they make for a fast rolling set of wheels. In the $400 range, he'll end up with a nice set of wheels that will be faster than box section rims in all but the steepest of climbs. He never mentioned a specific weight so I always err on the side of too many spokes. You never want a set of wheels where you wish you had a few more spokes because they weren't up to task. 4 extra spokes will never be a detriment to a set of wheels.

-Eric
 

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Deep Vs and Climbing?

cthomas said:
If you live in a hilly area (like me), the DeepVs are a killer and will wear you out. They are great for Tri riding or the flats, but not climbing.
Interesting thread and lots of good information. Could the wheel mavens in the community please enlighten me regarding this comment? What are the issues with using Deep V rims on steep terrain? Is it just the weight issue or is there something else?
 

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Stogaguy said:
Interesting thread and lots of good information. Could the wheel mavens in the community please enlighten me regarding this comment? What are the issues with using Deep V rims on steep terrain? Is it just the weight issue or is there something else?
Well, the comment could refer to a couple of things. First is the belief that deep V rims are more "stiff" in the vertical plane than lower profile rims. The problem with this, though, is that there is virtually no difference in compliance in the vertical plane for wheels. If you want to mute the bumps a bit more, let some air out of the tires or run bigger tires (which run at lower pressures than smaller tires for a given rider/bike weight). The second belief is that deep V's are heavier and therefore slower, i.e. not the best climbing wheels. This is not true, except for when the road grade gets really steep. For grades less than that "really steep" grade, aerodynamics have a greater effect than lower rotating mass.
 
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