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Since Co-Motion is close by, I figured I would check them out. Mostly, I am still looking at a steel bike, but it now seems that Vanilla is out of the question. Also, the Co-Motion's seem to be very affordable.

Does anyone have much familiarity with the brand? I am mostly interested in their steel Espresso model (853 tubing) but also may consider the Ristretto down the line (it looks like a sweet race bike). I like the fact that they make 1cm increments, and the price is very competitive as well.
 

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chiho said:
Since Co-Motion is close by, I figured I would check them out. Mostly, I am still looking at a steel bike, but it now seems that Vanilla is out of the question. Also, the Co-Motion's seem to be very affordable.

Does anyone have much familiarity with the brand? I am mostly interested in their steel Espresso model (853 tubing) but also may consider the Ristretto down the line (it looks like a sweet race bike). I like the fact that they make 1cm increments, and the price is very competitive as well.
Co-motion is a very well regarded company in terms of frames and custom frames. They are primarily known as a tandem builder.

The prices on their steel frames are really good especially because you get a fork at a great price. You should also look at Burley and their Wolf Creek frame.
 

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I have the Espresso's very bigger brother, the Americano which I like for its stability and solidity - needed while touring on gravel roads with a BOB trailer. An advantage of buying a steel frame from Co-Motion is that you can have them build them it with the S&S coupler that allows you to break down the bike to fit in a airline-accepted overcharge-free suitcase.

I didn't know that Co-Motion's offerings compared favorably with the cost of other steel frames....
 

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Cyclesafe said:
I have the Espresso's very bigger brother, the Americano which I like for its stability and solidity - needed while touring on gravel roads with a BOB trailer. An advantage of buying a steel frame from Co-Motion is that you can have them build them it with the S&S coupler that allows you to break down the bike to fit in a airline-accepted overcharge-free suitcase.

I didn't know that Co-Motion's offerings compared favorably with the cost of other steel frames....
Well it's all relative
$1425 for an espresso with Wound up or Ouzo pro is in line with many other high-end steel bikes.

Best bang for buck is Gunnar IMHO
 

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No feedback on Co-Motion, but if you're looking to buy local you have a few choices. Co-Motion, Burley, and Bike Friday are all in Eugene. Although I think Bike Friday only makes 20" wheeled travel bikes.
 

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undies said:
Co-Motion, Burley, and Bike Friday are all in Eugene.
A friend of mine worked at Bike Friday and bought a Co-Motion. He said BF's shop practices were...well, you do the math.

I don't know what CM model he bought, but it's all aluminum, all nice round tubes. Looks great. He likes it well enough, but it's a 52cm frame and is flexier than my 58cm Ti Dean. He produces hockey-player-style wattage now (2000+), and really just wishes he had a derailleur hanger on his track bike. Apparently, it's one of the first single-rider frames CM had made, so it's got a few quirks (I've worked on it), but fit-n-finish is very nice. And the paint...ooohh, the paint. They do nice paint.
 
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ashwinearl said:
Well it's all relative
$1425 for an espresso with Wound up or Ouzo pro is in line with many other high-end steel bikes.

Best bang for buck is Gunnar IMHO

I just bought a Curtlo with custom steel fork for $920. Paid another $100 over and above for paint upgrades. So about $1000 for custom built steel frame fork and paint.

That is mighty hard to beat.
 

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toomanybikes said:
I just bought a Curtlo with custom steel fork for $920. Paid another $100 over and above for paint upgrades. So about $1000 for custom built steel frame fork and paint.

That is mighty hard to beat.
My custom Allan Wanta is costing me $795 for the frame and fork, which seems like a screamin' deal to me. I gave him some rough ideas on the paint job and told him to use his imagination.

However, I'm getting the custom for some specific reasons.

A) I'm ridiculously huge and the only off-the-shelf 68cm frames I could get come from Rivendell with very large price tages.

2) I've been playing around with some designs in my head, and Allan was willing to build the bike to my somewhat wacky (or at least non-standard) spec's.

Sooooo... What I'm trying to say here is that there are some good reasons to go with a non-custom, such as:

i) No lead time. You can get the bike right away rather than waiting months or years

*) Quality control. When a company builds many, many bikes exactly the same, they generally work out the kinks in the design and the manufacturing processes. Have you heard the phrase "Custom part, custom problem?" I work in a shop that does lots of prototyping work, so I know how true that phrase can be! With an off-the-shelf Comotion, you'd get away from "custom problems."

I don't know the details about Comotion's product line, but they have a very good reputation in the industry. I don't think you'd go wrong if you bought one. Then you should ride it for a few months, come up with some wacky ideas of your own, and order a custom from Curtlo, Allan Wanta, or whomever you like. With the Comotion to ride, you won't be bugging the custom builder about the progress on your frame every 30 minutes. Then, you can build up the custom and do a side-by-side comparison of the custom vs. the Comotion.

You do have unlimited money, right? ;)

- FBB
 

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I purchased a Co-Motion Espresso 3 years ago. Off the shelf frame with custom paint that I purchased from Hutch's in Eugene. The ride and Co-Motions attention to detail is extraordinary. The people at Hutch's and Co-Motion are great fun to work with too.
 
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fbagatelleblack said:
My custom Allan Wanta is costing me $795 for the frame and fork, which seems like a screamin' deal to me. I gave him some rough ideas on the paint job and told him to use his imagination.

However, I'm getting the custom for some specific reasons.

A) I'm ridiculously huge and the only off-the-shelf 68cm frames I could get come from Rivendell with very large price tages.

2) I've been playing around with some designs in my head, and Allan was willing to build the bike to my somewhat wacky (or at least non-standard) spec's.

Sooooo... What I'm trying to say here is that there are some good reasons to go with a non-custom, such as:

i) No lead time. You can get the bike right away rather than waiting months or years

*) Quality control. When a company builds many, many bikes exactly the same, they generally work out the kinks in the design and the manufacturing processes. Have you heard the phrase "Custom part, custom problem?" I work in a shop that does lots of prototyping work, so I know how true that phrase can be! With an off-the-shelf Comotion, you'd get away from "custom problems."

I don't know the details about Comotion's product line, but they have a very good reputation in the industry. I don't think you'd go wrong if you bought one. Then you should ride it for a few months, come up with some wacky ideas of your own, and order a custom from Curtlo, Allan Wanta, or whomever you like. With the Comotion to ride, you won't be bugging the custom builder about the progress on your frame every 30 minutes. Then, you can build up the custom and do a side-by-side comparison of the custom vs. the Comotion.

You do have unlimited money, right? ;)

- FBB
You bugger! Great price. I thought I did well. Good call.

They should charge you a premium for the amount of extra steel they have to use to build the frame!!!
 

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toomanybikes said:
You bugger! Great price. I thought I did well. Good call.

They should charge you a premium for the amount of extra steel they have to use to build the frame!!!
I'd wait a while before curses or congratulates (spelling?) anyone. Allan W is a bit of a free spirit. He made a beautiful fork for me, but the end product was not exactly what I asked for - not quite as much clearance as I had requested and the paint was not sparkly. He is known for building good, solid frames with interesting paint jobs - but the detail work is not up to some other builders' standards and I've heard of a few mistakes he's made (which he has promptly and happily fixed at his own expense).

So, continue to think you did well. I think I will have Curtlo build my next custom - unless my wife breaks both my legs for spending so much on a bicycle. ;)

- FBB
 

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I was considering buying an Allan Wanta frame. The only thing is I could not really find any reviews that give a good description about the finished product.

Why are you having Wanta build you a frame now while at the same time planning on having Curtlo build your next frame?
 

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Fivethumbs said:
Why are you having Wanta build you a frame now while at the same time planning on having Curtlo build your next frame?
IF I ever get another custom frame THEN I will probably get a Curtlo. Just for a bit of variety. If I love the Wanta more than anything, I might stick with him, though.

- FBB
 

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I have nothing but good things to say about their frames and service.
Opted for a custom Co-Motion Espresso cyclocross frame last year,
which I competed on all through the OR CX season (~10 races) -- the
bike certainly didn't hold me back. Stable and plenty stiff; after tweaking
the buildup some, it has also turned into my go-to training bike on
the road, leaving higher-end (and lighter) bikes parked in the garage.
 
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comot said:
I have nothing but good things to say about their frames and service.
Opted for a custom Co-Motion Espresso cyclocross frame last year,
which I competed on all through the OR CX season (~10 races) -- the
bike certainly didn't hold me back. Stable and plenty stiff; after tweaking
the buildup some, it has also turned into my go-to training bike on
the road, leaving higher-end (and lighter) bikes parked in the garage.
Very nice bike.

I am curious about the picture though. When was it taken? I did not think that Michelin made the green tires anymore?
 

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toomanybikes said:
Very nice bike.

I am curious about the picture though. When was it taken? I did not think that Michelin made the green tires anymore?
Well spotted, came across a pair of older Jets at a local shop
last year. It's a shame they've since then gone boring all-black;
bring back the green!
 

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Co-Motions

I have three Co-Motion singles.
Steel Expresso
Alum Expresso
Steel NorWester.

And my blind friend has a Co-Motion Java tandem I ride frequently.

All great bikes and ride well. The Norwester is very comfy and I have riden it up to 375 miles in a day and a bit on brevets.

Let me see if I can attach a picture of my brevet bike. I love this bike and it has carried me many miles in the past couple of years.
 

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This is my co-motion, a 1996-97 Espresso with campy record. I can't say enough good things about it. Sure, I'm not really experienced with a lot of road bikes, but this thing rides like a dream. Every time I stop into the bike shop it gets tons of looks and when I had it rebuilt the mechanic would not stop talking about it. This will be my bike for the rest of my life (and I'm only 25 now)

Since this pic was taken I've replaced the saddle with a brooks and gone clipless.

 
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