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Cog width. I'm not even remotely sure, and someone can please correct me if I'm wrong, but I would venture to guess you need a 3/32" for a Pista.

1/8" is kind of the heavier-duty/BMX standard width. Although, you can still use a 1/8" chain on a 3/32" cog (I think you'll run into some faster wearing), you can't use a 1/8" cog on a smaller chain.

I could be making a mistake though, so someone please correct me if I am.
 

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No Mistake

beergood said:
Cog width. I'm not even remotely sure, and someone can please correct me if I'm wrong, but I would venture to guess you need a 3/32" for a Pista.

1/8" is kind of the heavier-duty/BMX standard width. Although, you can still use a 1/8" chain on a 3/32" cog (I think you'll run into some faster wearing), you can't use a 1/8" cog on a smaller chain.

I could be making a mistake though, so someone please correct me if I am.
Your Pista will come with an 8 speed chain and 3/32" cog. That 8 speed chain won't work on a 1/8" cog.

I have switched to a 1/8" chain which works fine with the 3/32" cog and with a 1/8" cog.

TT
 

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1/8 is the standard width on a pista. I don't know about the Bianchis they currently sell in the US though. Using a 1/8 chain on a 3/32 cog usually is a little noisier and the engagement might not be as perfect, but it works well enough for recreational use.
 

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A 1/8 is going to be stronger and stiffer than 3/32. there are even differences amongst 3/32 chains -- newer types built for index shifting tend to be more flexible and less desirable for a fixed gear. But like I said, 3/32 is sufficient for many riders.
 

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Stiffer yes but not stronger*. Geared mountain bikes (3/32" chains) exert much more force on a chain with granny gears than any track sprinter could. Get a good 8 speed chain and call it a day.

By the way, I do run 1/8" chains but not because of strength - 20 years of accumulated cogs and chainrings make it cost more than it's worth to switch over to 3/32".


*Actually this is irrellivant since chain failure usually happens as the side plate delaminates from the pin which has nothing to do with the actual width of the pin.
 

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You're probably right about about a 8sp chain being stronger than an 1/8" chain if you have a bad chain line, but I find it hard to believe that it's going to be stronger when you use it on a fixed gear. Of course it's all irrelevant since I can't imagine being able to snap either chain.... By the way, I had both 1/8 and 3/32 until 5 years ago when I went to all 3/32nd.
 

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you're smart for switching over. I keep thinking I will but then I look at my perfectly good cogs and chainrings and decide to wait... then I buy another 1/8" cog and it only gets worse.. I have a problem and I need to stop.

As far as theoretical strength goes where (-----) is the chain pin and (^) is the cog. The 1/8" pin is longer and so the force of the cog has more leverage on the pin. A very extreme example would be: what would be easier to break a 1' dowel or a 4' dowel of equal diameter using equal force applied in the middle.

1/8"
-------^--------

3/32"
-----^------


Theory is fun and all but riding is better so ride what you have as long as it puts a smile on your face.
 

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Perhaps you're right, but it seems to me that the side plates and everything else on a 1/8 inch chain seem to be a lot thicker and sturdier. I'll have to contemplate this one. I kind of regret getting rid of all my 1/8 stuff, I wish I had kept them since you never know when you might build up another bike...
 
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