Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a video on the frame being painted, there are also other videos on the lugging process of the frame, interview with Ernesto Colnago himself....thought this is a very interesting video and should be seen by everyone, not just fans of Colnago in that forum. It shows how delicate the process is of making a high end frame....good stuff.


this is the painting process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Awesome!

Thanks for sharing that. I love watching those kinds of videos. The discovery channel has a show called "How It's Made". I must put in a request for videos of this nature.

As soon as the Publisher's Clearing House Van pays a visit, I, in turn, will plan a visit to Italy with order in hand. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
Wow. It truly is amazing the level of work that goes into one of those paint jobs. Can you imagine how much masking tape they go through? It's a shame that, to my eyes, they end up with an unattractive bike. Too busy for my standards.

P.S. I'm pretty sure the old guy at the end said orgy. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
waldo425 said:
Well that explains a lot as to why they are so damn expensive.

Those frames are lugged thus require more individual attention in the manufacturing process, and with the paint job we get to understand why they're expensive. That kind of makes you wonder though, what about those Pinarello Prince? Top of the line cervelos? They're equally expensive..but they're monocoque frames so the frames are complete once they come out from the mold....and does not require as much individual attention in the process...and I'm guessing their "expensiveness" comes from them sponsoring pro teams and their marketing cost etc. Granted, if made the right way, lugged frames can perform just as well if not better than monocoque frames in terms of stiffness, but if you're smashing that much cash in a frame, it might as well be one of those colnagos...thoughts?

Colnagos aren't seen as much in pro tours but is and if not more respected than other large pro tour brands based on quality and deliciousness...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts
When I bought my Master X-Light in '02, the owner of my LBS explained the method of how Colnago paints their bikes. A long process. Although I wonder how much that paint job costs. And try to touch up one of their Art Deco paint schemes. I sure love my MXL though.
 

·
Hucken The Fard Up !
Joined
·
3,983 Posts
After looking at that, I experience a lust for a Colnago.

However I haven't seen one that pleases me enough ( I am a Bianchi man ;) )

Which Colnago would you suggest to make me change to the dark side ?
 

·
Hucken The Fard Up !
Joined
·
3,983 Posts

·
Lemur-ing
Joined
·
18,987 Posts
Damn! That's cool.

I like the blue one that was featured shortly towards the end.

Now I wonder how Lance's new henna like bike for the Giro is made! Probably a similar process.

What I don't get is - they say the put it into the oven to heat it to 50deg Celsius but yet the guy takes it out of the oven with his bare hands. :idea:
 

·
MING
Joined
·
419 Posts
50 degree Celsius is about 120 f, not that hot.

great video, what i thought was funny was that after than intensive painting process the headbadge is a decal.
 

·
Baltic Scum
Joined
·
1,826 Posts
uzziefly said:
What I don't get is - they say the put it into the oven to heat it to 50deg Celsius but yet the guy takes it out of the oven with his bare hands. :idea:
Let 'em cool first, then get the video camera and open the door?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
simplyhankk said:
Those frames are lugged thus require more individual attention in the manufacturing process, and with the paint job we get to understand why they're expensive. That kind of makes you wonder though, what about those Pinarello Prince? Top of the line cervelos? They're equally expensive..but they're monocoque frames so the frames are complete once they come out from the mold....and does not require as much individual attention in the process...and I'm guessing their "expensiveness" comes from them sponsoring pro teams and their marketing cost etc. Granted, if made the right way, lugged frames can perform just as well if not better than monocoque frames in terms of stiffness, but if you're smashing that much cash in a frame, it might as well be one of those colnagos...thoughts?

Colnagos aren't seen as much in pro tours but is and if not more respected than other large pro tour brands based on quality and deliciousness...
Tooling up for monocoque frames in all the various sizes needed to sell a particular model of a brand...expensive, too. Maintaining the molds, controlling the lay up, paying for the autoclave ovens..expense again.

Lugged frames can perform as well as monocoque frames...Ummm? Why do you say that? Lugged frames are a carry-over from metal frames. They had to make em that way out of metal, but making a carbon fiber "tube" then sticking it into a lug of carbon fiber? Why?. Carbon has made that style of bike frame archaic, which is why the Pros quit racing on them, for the most part. There are some modern Colnagos being built (and raced) now with molded frames..lighter, stiffer stronger...But the traditional frame style..it still appeals to some...

Don Hanson
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top