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I gave some rough estimates of where the issues were (since it wasn't immediately after a ride) and sent in some photos of my installation.

The response I got was "equipment incompatibility" because they thought the saddle couldn't be moved forward.
As we mentioned, we provide feedback based on the description of issues experienced. It will help greatly if the description provided is accurate, otherwise the troubleshooting will not go as intended.

Also, it seems you omitted an important part of our feedback. You provided a photo showing your saddle was installed level across the entire surface:

Yellow White Electrical supply Synthetic rubber Bicycle part


As part of our feedback, we referred to our installation instructions, which says that only the middle portion of our saddles, not the entire length, should be considered when leveling. In the instructions we also mention specifically that our saddles should not be tilted nose up. Since your saddle has a rear slope, leveling across the entire saddle will result in the nose tilting up. We have not heard back from you regarding this aspect of our feedback.

We want to use this opportunity to also say:

1. We have had perhaps a couple of users who say that they have had bike fitting done and hence they must be sitting at the right location/the saddle is installed correctly. Since we design and manufacture our saddles ourselves, we have very specific instructions on where to sit and how to install our saddles. These are not dependent on any third party, nor on any saddle made by other manufacturers.

2. To move the troubleshooting in the right direction, it will really help to be precise in the description of issues. Not being precise will result in us going in the wrong direction, the user having to backtrack, and the overall experience deteriorates rapidly for all involved.
Precision will also involve knowing the difference say between the rami, sitbones and perineum. We have encountered a small number of users who are very convinced their sitbones have been supporting their weight for the past few decades, only for us to figure out that they were instead sitting on their perineum. It takes humongous effort to correct this misconception.
 

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Most decent LBS's will have a brand or two that have a trial saddle program where you can try different ones over time and see what you like without getting stuck with the wrong one.

That being said, I like my Fabric, and it was sub $100.
 

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As we mentioned, we provide feedback based on the description of issues experienced. It will help greatly if the description provided is accurate, otherwise the troubleshooting will not go as intended.

Also, it seems you omitted an important part of our feedback. You provided a photo showing your saddle was installed level across the entire surface:

View attachment 323194

As part of our feedback, we referred to our installation instructions, which says that only the middle portion of our saddles, not the entire length, should be considered when leveling. In the instructions we also mention specifically that our saddles should not be tilted nose up. Since your saddle has a rear slope, leveling across the entire saddle will result in the nose tilting up. We have not heard back from you regarding this aspect of our feedback.

We want to use this opportunity to also say:

1. We have had perhaps a couple of users who say that they have had bike fitting done and hence they must be sitting at the right location/the saddle is installed correctly. Since we design and manufacture our saddles ourselves, we have very specific instructions on where to sit and how to install our saddles. These are not dependent on any third party, nor on any saddle made by other manufacturers.

2. To move the troubleshooting in the right direction, it will really help to be precise in the description of issues. Not being precise will result in us going in the wrong direction, the user having to backtrack, and the overall experience deteriorates rapidly for all involved.
Precision will also involve knowing the difference say between the rami, sitbones and perineum. We have encountered a small number of users who are very convinced their sitbones have been supporting their weight for the past few decades, only for us to figure out that they were instead sitting on their perineum. It takes humongous effort to correct this misconception.
I did respond to your diagnosis and explained that I could could nose the saddle down and move it forward, as well as get a more a more accurate location of discomfort after a long ride. Your response was that you still classified it as "incompatible". You have been very dismissive and not offering any assistance to me so far. Feel free to reach out to me if you're now willing to help me out...

If you are able to determine compatibility from photos you might want to request them from customers beforehand to avoid this.
 

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Scott Chapman:

As we demonstrated, we did continue to help in your case, which we think is equipment incompatible, by pointing out the installation issue you had regarding saddle tilt. As we state as part of our policy which we make everyone confirm they've read before an order can be placed, equipment incompatibility means the case will be handled at our discretion. It does not mean that we stop helping you.

This policy was added a while ago to align users' expectations to the service we provide. For instance, folks with bikes that are too big for them will require an extra long saddle to get it to work, which we don't make. We only make saddles to fit the body, not the rest of the bike. There are bikes with side-loading saddle rail clamps that fit 7x10 rails only. We don't make 7x10 carbon rails, just 7x9 ones. We need to make clear that we don't make saddles to fit the rest of the bike so that it can be installed and used per our instructions.
 

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Scott Chapman:

As we demonstrated, we did continue to help in your case, which we think is equipment incompatible, by pointing out the installation issue you had regarding saddle tilt. As we state as part of our policy which we make everyone confirm they've read before an order can be placed, equipment incompatibility means the case will be handled at our discretion. It does not mean that we stop helping you.

This policy was added a while ago to align users' expectations to the service we provide. For instance, folks with bikes that are too big for them will require an extra long saddle to get it to work, which we don't make. We only make saddles to fit the body, not the rest of the bike. There are bikes with side-loading saddle rail clamps that fit 7x10 rails only. We don't make 7x10 carbon rails, just 7x9 ones. We need to make clear that we don't make saddles to fit the rest of the bike so that it can be installed and used per our instructions.
You did stop helping me when you reinforced your incompatible equipment classification when I offered make some adjustments based on your feedback. Incompatible means that it is not capable of working together. That seems like a pretty strong classification based on saddle tilt to me. The saddle can be tilted differently and I offered to do that. What I was hoping for was some specific guidance on what specifically you would like me to adjust and then how I should go about measuring the results. But instead you are telling me that I should just discard the saddle because it can't be made to work.

Perhaps you meant a different word?

(I apologize to others on the forum, I did ask they reach out to me if they are willing to help me out.)
 

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Scott Chapman,

1. Again, equipment incompatibility does not imply we stop working with you. That is not what is written in our policy, that is not what we did. We did not tell you that you should just discard the saddle, at all. We neither said that directly, nor implied that in any way.

2. We worked through the inputs you gave and provided corresponding feedback. Equipment incompatibility is the result of your saddle not being able to be moved forward based on the photo you sent. Saddle tilt feedback is based on your photo showing the leveler on top of your saddle. That is the photo we posted earlier. These are two separate feedback based on separate inputs. We are not sure how you came to the conclusion that the incompatibility is based on saddle tilt, but that is incorrect.

At this time, it appears that we have no further input on the matter.
 

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Most decent LBS's will have a brand or two that have a trial saddle program where you can try different ones over time and see what you like without getting stuck with the wrong one.

That being said, I like my Fabric, and it was sub $100.
Zactlee. I've been pretty impressed with Fabric build and comfort (i've tried nearly a dozen different saddles this year). Really a good value...
 

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I did respond to your diagnosis and explained that I could could nose the saddle down and move it forward, as well as get a more a more accurate location of discomfort after a long ride. Your response was that you still classified it as "incompatible". You have been very dismissive and not offering any assistance to me so far. Feel free to reach out to me if you're now willing to help me out...

If you are able to determine compatibility from photos you might want to request them from customers beforehand to avoid this.
As an owner of Meld saddle, I am curious if you have photos from different angle that you can share, i.e. side view. Mine has been working fine for over a year.
 

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...Just going to take this off-forum. Again, apologies to the audience...
Get your nets out cause i'm about to make a lot of opinions fly.

For those guys "trying" saddles and spending "five figures" (really?) you are not fit to your frame. Period. Scott Champan, you need to get yourself fit and trust the fitters recommendations and not go home and move everything back to what feels familiar. Also, your seat is installed incorrectly. I don't mean to sound like a d!ck, but if you can't get this part right, you can't really grasp the many facets of a proper bike fit. Nice LOOK BTW. I will agree with Meld in that for the most part, saddle comfort is not subjective, it is an objective measurement. I said it before and will repeat again, you could be easily comfortable on more than one seat provided that you are correctly fit to your bike. Not impossible given than most here will agree that you can be fit to a bike correctly given two adjacent sized frames.

To all you guys riding with level bars and seats so far back that your arsehole is over the rear hub, looking for that magical seat, sitting bolt upright on that pelvis, or sitting on the front part of your seat: you're doing it wrong. You could be riding faster, more comfortable and infinitely more efficient if you just went and got a proper bike fit. You'd open up your hips, increase your cadence, lower your bars, and just plain feel better on the bike instead of mashing with that seat slammed back on its rails.

Finally, 11speed, ease up a bit on Kontakt. Both of you are very well informed and know more about bike fitting than 97.37% of the general cycling pop. I think you're both getting caught up in the syntax of pivoting around the crank and opening up hips.
 

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As an owner of Meld saddle, I am curious if you have photos from different angle that you can share, i.e. side view. Mine has been working fine for over a year.
Sure. Bicycle frame Bicycle tire Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel rim


I've had a number of saddles with curved profiles, and generally I've had more luck with them when leveled end-to-end. Manufacturers are mixed on recommendations, and I realize Meld recommends leveling from middle not end-to-end. But that's where I started.

Still hoping to get it dialed in.
 

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Get your nets out cause i'm about to make a lot of opinions fly.

For those guys "trying" saddles and spending "five figures" (really?) you are not fit to your frame. Period. Scott Champan, you need to get yourself fit and trust the fitters recommendations and not go home and move everything back to what feels familiar. Also, your seat is installed incorrectly. I don't mean to sound like a d!ck, but if you can't get this part right, you can't really grasp the many facets of a proper bike fit. Nice LOOK BTW. I will agree with Meld in that for the most part, saddle comfort is not subjective, it is an objective measurement. I said it before and will repeat again, you could be easily comfortable on more than one seat provided that you are correctly fit to your bike. Not impossible given than most here will agree that you can be fit to a bike correctly given two adjacent sized frames.

To all you guys riding with level bars and seats so far back that your arsehole is over the rear hub, looking for that magical seat, sitting bolt upright on that pelvis, or sitting on the front part of your seat: you're doing it wrong. You could be riding faster, more comfortable and infinitely more efficient if you just went and got a proper bike fit. You'd open up your hips, increase your cadence, lower your bars, and just plain feel better on the bike instead of mashing with that seat slammed back on its rails.

Finally, 11speed, ease up a bit on Kontakt. Both of you are very well informed and know more about bike fitting than 97.37% of the general cycling pop. I think you're both getting caught up in the syntax of pivoting around the crank and opening up hips.
Yip totally agree on getting fit; I did that when I got the bike (since it has an integrated seatpost and frame needs to be cut) and I had it done by a real pro (someone who does this for pro/semi-pro riders in the area) since I was dropping serious coin on the frame.

That was a while ago.

That all being said, there is some art mixed in with the science and there is some variation between fitting recommendations. So it is perfectly reasonable to propose "tweaks" to help dial in the fit especially when equipment (say saddles) is changed. Which is Meld's point.
 

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Yip totally agree on getting fit; I did that when I got the bike (since it has an integrated seatpost and frame needs to be cut) and I had it done by a real pro (someone who does this for pro/semi-pro riders in the area) since I was dropping serious coin on the frame.

That was a while ago.

That all being said, there is some art mixed in with the science and there is some variation between fitting recommendations. So it is perfectly reasonable to propose "tweaks" to help dial in the fit especially when equipment (say saddles) is changed. Which is Meld's point.
Looks like you got that fit alright. And, you're right about tweaks, I had a year off due to baby came back and had to tweak what felt great before. Four months in, I moved it back to where it was (mostly bar drop) now that my body got used and loosened up a bit.
 

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That all being said, there is some art mixed in with the science and there is some variation between fitting recommendations. So it is perfectly reasonable to propose "tweaks" to help dial in the fit especially when equipment (say saddles) is changed. Which is Meld's point.
If you were able to slide & tilt the saddle for dialing-in, what was the problem?
 

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If you were able to slide & tilt the saddle for dialing-in, what was the problem?
Basically this:
Equipment incompatibility is the result of your saddle not being able to be moved forward based on the photo you sent
To me that means the equipment cannot work together because they believe the saddle can't be moved forward. Which it can.

So I'm just really unclear if I should move forward with the adjustments, and invest more in getting it dialed in. I can't reconcile that with:
equipment incompatibility does not imply we stop working with you
 

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Basically this:


To me that means the equipment cannot work together because they believe the saddle can't be moved forward. Which it can.

So I'm just really unclear if I should move forward with the adjustments, and invest more in getting it dialed in. I can't reconcile that with:
Since you have the actual thing and able to view the saddle and seatpost close ups, you can decide better where the slide limits are on the saddle rail (straight portion). If you have tried other saddles in the past, it's easy to tell. I found my Meld saddle to have longer straight portion of rail than many other saddles I've tried (Specialized, Selle Italia, Fizik, Selle San Marco, ...etc.) except Selle SMP (the longest).

Go ahead and test it.
 

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Get your nets out cause i'm about to make a lot of opinions fly.

For those guys "trying" saddles and spending "five figures" (really?) you are not fit to your frame. Period. Scott Champan, you need to get yourself fit and trust the fitters recommendations and not go home and move everything back to what feels familiar. Also, your seat is installed incorrectly. I don't mean to sound like a d!ck, but if you can't get this part right, you can't really grasp the many facets of a proper bike fit. Nice LOOK BTW. I will agree with Meld in that for the most part, saddle comfort is not subjective, it is an objective measurement. I said it before and will repeat again, you could be easily comfortable on more than one seat provided that you are correctly fit to your bike. Not impossible given than most here will agree that you can be fit to a bike correctly given two adjacent sized frames.

To all you guys riding with level bars and seats so far back that your arsehole is over the rear hub, looking for that magical seat, sitting bolt upright on that pelvis, or sitting on the front part of your seat: you're doing it wrong. You could be riding faster, more comfortable and infinitely more efficient if you just went and got a proper bike fit. You'd open up your hips, increase your cadence, lower your bars, and just plain feel better on the bike instead of mashing with that seat slammed back on its rails.

Finally, 11speed, ease up a bit on Kontakt. Both of you are very well informed and know more about bike fitting than 97.37% of the general cycling pop. I think you're both getting caught up in the syntax of pivoting around the crank and opening up hips.
Kontact has been dormant from RBR since February. And 11spd is too busy stirring the pot on another rim vs disc brake thread.
 

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Since you have the actual thing and able to view the saddle and seatpost close ups, you can decide better where the slide limits are on the saddle rail (straight portion). If you have tried other saddles in the past, it's easy to tell. I found my Meld saddle to have longer straight portion of rail than many other saddles I've tried (Specialized, Selle Italia, Fizik, Selle San Marco, ...etc.) except Selle SMP (the longest).

Go ahead and test it.
Yea, I'm inclined to do that since I have made the investment already.

Out of curiosity how did you determine where you should be sitting on the saddle?

What I noticed when I first rode it (and I thought it was really interesting on my first couple of 20-milers) was that it felt like I "nestled" into a specific portion of the saddle. Sort of like sitting on someone cupped hands (stop laughing). That may have contributed to me sitting improperly while riding.
 

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Since you have the actual thing and able to view the saddle and seatpost close ups, you can decide better where the slide limits are on the saddle rail (straight portion). If you have tried other saddles in the past, it's easy to tell. I found my Meld saddle to have longer straight portion of rail than many other saddles I've tried (Specialized, Selle Italia, Fizik, Selle San Marco, ...etc.) except Selle SMP (the longest).

Go ahead and test it.
I just throw some tools in my back pocket and go out to ride on a new seat. I made adjustments and revisit every X miles. Adjustments for the worse will become apparent in mere yards. Play with it and see what has you spinning more effortlessly with a better weight distribution.
 

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Yea, I'm inclined to do that since I have made the investment already.

Out of curiosity how did you determine where you should be sitting on the saddle?
By going out for rides. It's one of those things that you just have to try to find out.
Sort of like sitting on someone cupped hands (stop laughing).
I'm not laughing. I remember (or not) those days when I weighed around 9 pounds. Brown Skin Photograph Colorfulness White


That may have contributed to me sitting improperly while riding.
The distance of ride can sort things out whether something is working or not. When I've tried saddle that just doesn't work for me, it became apparent within 5 miles of ride. The one that's kind of OK but not, became apparent in 30 miles. The one I thought was working well but not totally, was determined at the end of a century ride.

You just gotta try it.
 
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