Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
passive/aggressive
Joined
·
236 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From https://www.areaware.com

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2611164972/" title="Strida-1 by Melinda and David, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3241/2611164972_87a3a274d1_o.jpg" width="816" height="672" alt="Strida-1" /></a>

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2611165048/" title="Strida-2 by Melinda and David, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3183/2611165048_ee6e05116c_o.jpg" width="799" height="585" alt="Strida-2" /></a>

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2610332169/" title="Strida-3 by Melinda and David, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3264/2610332169_3e3cf37fe8_o.jpg" width="816" height="607" alt="Strida-3" /></a>

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2611165136/" title="Strida-4 by Melinda and David, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3038/2611165136_3468184bcb_o.jpg" width="816" height="672" alt="Strida-4" /></a>

Not sure if you have seen this but it is very clean and nice. I would roll on one if I lived in a place that it made sense. As I designer I love the lines + the functionality. As I cyclist I love the functionality + the design.
 

·
The web is a MUT
Joined
·
1,380 Posts
They have one of these at the LBS I wrench at part-time, the only people I see riding it are the occasional employee. Many look at it, but I've yet to see a customer ride it. The text states it was formulated in 1987, and here we are 21 years later. Maybe I'll take it out for a spin in the parking lot tonight just for grins. I wonder how it compares to a Bike-Friday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Just looked em up... they're about $800. I think it's a sort of artsy avant garde kinda clientele... they sell them at the Institue for Contemporary Art here in Boston.

I think they might catch on as an alternative kind of folder, if they were smart enough to work with the rest of the cycling world. You know, basic things like commonly available interchangeable parts, in lieu of a belt drive.

I dig it, I think it might be a really cool thing to bring on the subway, becuase it folds up so small... normal bikes are restricted during regular commuting hours, but this folds up smaller than a stroller, so I don't think anyone would gripe... which would extend the range of anyone who was trying to do a hybrid bike/subway commute... which would be cool.

BUT, part of the appeal to me of a bicycle is the essential simplicity, both of the normal bicycle design, and of the ability or the average guy to repair one. There are few things that are normally so simple. New parts are easy to come by, or to salvage off of other bikes. I don't think there's a bike in my basement (of the 6 I own) that is even close to OEM specs anymore. But on this bike, these parts look so proprietary that they're so far above and beyond a really sloppy Shimano wet dream. Lefty and righty, with their own special wheels, with disc brakes, belt drives, no option that I can see to swap in different hubs or multiple speeds... Everything would have to come from the manufacturer, and it doesn't look like there's much to hope for in the way of upgrades from aftermarket vendors.

A nice design that's very attractive, aesthetically and practically. But it is hideously clubfooted and crippled from conception by the ego of the designer, in his apparent desire to completely reinvent the wheel. Maybe it's one of those elitist things where it's only intended for an elite and impractical audience... which I think is a shame. it's a really cool idea for a folding bike. I'm not a folding bike kind of guy, but I'd seriously consider one of those if the guy who made it showed a willingness to understand the practical aspects of the cycling world.

I'll have to go on a field trip sometime to see one in person though.

--edited after looking them up, and seeing them on youtube--

I hold to my original reaction, but I'm willing to give the guy props for trying something new. And I'm also aware that there is a portion of the population who aren't like me... they weren't born with a wrench in their hand, and a desire to modify anything, right out of the box. The choice of belt drive is apparently to keep the suited business types from getting greasy while folding up the bike, which makes sense, I guess. And after watching a few people ride em on you tube, and fold them up, they're less painful to watch. It's not a cyclist's bike. It's a bike for people who are just looking for a little more range and speed than their shiny shoes. I'll concede that ground. They're looking for something else in a bike than I am.

I could gripe about people who weren't born with a wrench in hand. But then again, the inventor clearly was, and went in an interesting direction with it. I'll give him props for that. It certainly beat the A-bike in teh comparison on youtube. I think for people who don't really want to mess with anything, it's a nifty novelty. But probably wouldn't really sell in a performance bike shop. Just a different market.

I still want to see one in person.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Damn you youtube!!!

So, after bouncing around youtoob looking at various folding bike videos...

I think if I had to go with a folding bike, I'd look at a bike friday. I think the Strida is still a nifty sort of concept thing, and it epitomizes the KISS principle. But folding bikes have evolved much farther, even if they are more complex.
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
13,390 Posts
Personally the thing, and probably the only thing, I like about it is the belt drive. Harley Davidson did it for motorcycles, I wish somebody would do it for cycling in general. Inexpensive, won't wear out components, clean, no lube needed, light weight, complelety silent...what's not to like?
 

·
Potatoes
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
I've seen a couple of them here in Berlin. To me it's just a folding bike adaption of a Pederson (I've seen the odd one here as well). Problems I see with these bikes is that a lot of bits and pieces are proprietary- something I never like. But I do like that you don't have to disconnect any cables.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,838 Posts
Mr. Versatile said:
Personally the thing, and probably the only thing, I like about it is the belt drive. Harley Davidson did it for motorcycles, I wish somebody would do it for cycling in general. Inexpensive, won't wear out components, clean, no lube needed, light weight, complelety silent...what's not to like?
How does it perform under 1000 watts peak?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top