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Hey all,

Im wondering if any of you use your weekday commute as a platform for training for things like road or MTB races and , road or MTB endurance events or just those epic weekend rides with friends.

Has anyone found a good balance between just riding everyday and compartmentizing your effort so that you rest during the week and arent tired (or burnt) when it comes to the weekend?


THanks..hey its HUMP day...yeeehhhhaawww
 

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For me commuting is just commuting, however I do believe that early week commutes do help me recover from the weekends long rides.

If I am going to do some training during the week that is a seperate ride from the commute.
 

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I integrate commutes into my weekly training schedule, either as active recovery rides, or by extending them to include my daily training content. If I want to get in more saddle time, it is easy to add. I find that I get a lot more hard efforts in commuting than I ever would have thought possible, just as a function of where and how I typically choose to commute.

The best thing that I ever did was to start commuting. I can always get in more training rides, and structure enough recovery time to be ready for bigger efforts over the weekend. But it gets me out, gives me something different, and training on a heavier bike with a back pack makes zipping along in lycra on my road bike cake by comparison, especially on hills. My bike handling skills have improved significantly from commuting too.

In terms of not getting too burnt out, I did figure out that I can't commute and ride a full daily training schedule too. Kind of knew that already though.
 

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Waaaaaaay back in the day, I lived in Carpinteria, CA and commuted to Santa Barbara. The ride was 18 miles each way. As a young, buff racer dude, this was perfect for me. 18 miles in the morning and 18 miles at night was a very light workout day for me. I could add as much mileage as I wanted on the way home to give me longer training days.

Boy, that was a long time ago. Now I think a 36 mile day is really working it hard!

I'm trying to get back into a situation in which I can bike commute. These days, I think that anything over 8 miles each way would be pushing it on the days when I was in a hurry. On the relaxed days, I'm sure I'd find the time to put in an extra 10 or 20 miles after work.

Yours,

FBB
 

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My commuting is my primary training for road and mtb racing. Not the best way, but it fits in my busy schedule. I have one stretch of MUT that is three miles,has no cross roads, and has power poles evenly spaced about 150 feet apart. I use this stretch for one legged pedalling this time of year and will use it for sprint intervals in a month or so. The commuter is not the greatest sprinter with its less than stiff steel frame, heavy wheels and tires, and the bad effect of the rack and bag on swaying the bike in a heavy effort. It is good for motoring and drag racing up short hills.

The downside of using commuting for training is that you cannot think of your commute in a round trip miles. For example, if you have a 40 mile round trip, you have to think of it as ten, 20 mile rides. If you race, doing a 40 mile ride every afternoon probably wouldn't be a big deal because you have approximately 22 hours before the next ride to recover. If I could pick an ideal commute for training, it would be a short trip to work of 20 minutes or less and a choice of loops for the trip home. If you live in an area with good public transportation, you could mix a bus/train into your commute to cut down on the mileage of one of the legs to prevent overtraining. I think that ATP does something like this.
 

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It has worked for me.

I integrate my commuting with training, I started this last year and it has carried over into this year. I like this because; I use my main route (18 mi each way) as a gauge of my fitness. I keep a log of my daily rides (ride 1, 2 and so on) so I can look back and see progress. I got a killer light system (lupine) and this allows me to start earlier in the morning and add distance prior to work, that way I can still get home in the evening and see the family. They are sleeping in the morning and do not miss me, in the evening it is different. One evening a week in the summer is the weekly training race, which happens to be up the road from my house. It is great because I ride past my house, pick up the race bike and go on to the ride. I was initially tired at work when I started, but my body quickly adapted. The only thing is, I have to ensure that I get to bed at a reasonable hour. Therefore, bottom line, combining commuting and training has worked for me. Whether it is mountian or road, I believe it will work.
 

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Last year, my commute was 32 miles round trip. It gave me a good base, but by July, I was not feeling any stronger on my weekend rides. So I started to take the long way home (30 miles) twice a week on a back road with little traffic. It made a huge difference. My body can only take riding 5 days a week. I like to commute at least 3 days a week, and take long rides on the weekend. The one thing I found out on taking the long way home (30 miles), after a 16 mile morning commute, 30 miles is good distance for me to get a good workout, without beating me up. I was able to up my miles without adding another day on my bike.

Mr. MG said:
I integrate my commuting with training, I started this last year and it has carried over into this year. I like this because; I use my main route (18 mi each way) as a gauge of my fitness. I keep a log of my daily rides (ride 1, 2 and so on) so I can look back and see progress. I got a killer light system (lupine) and this allows me to start earlier in the morning and add distance prior to work, that way I can still get home in the evening and see the family. They are sleeping in the morning and do not miss me, in the evening it is different. One evening a week in the summer is the weekly training race, which happens to be up the road from my house. It is great because I ride past my house, pick up the race bike and go on to the ride. I was initially tired at work when I started, but my body quickly adapted. The only thing is, I have to ensure that I get to bed at a reasonable hour. Therefore, bottom line, combining commuting and training has worked for me. Whether it is mountian or road, I believe it will work.
 

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Works for me

Commuting is, at times, the major source of my milage (schedule issues.)

Another way to improve the value of the limited bike time is to ride fixte. It's amazing what a difference it makes when you can't coast....
 
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