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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Due to manufacturer warranty issue, I will be receiving a full refund on my beloved Storck. I've always loved the way the Storck handled (it fit me like a glove), and I'm looking for something that would handle similar (quick handling, nimble, little input to make maneuvers). Anyway, I know that some things effect this other than geometry alone, but which of the two options listed below would be similar?

If it matters, I ran a 80cm stem and zero setback seatpost on the Storck, saddle very much centrally mounted in the rails. Fit was performed by reputable local fitter.

Really my concern is in the TT length. I'm wondering if I would be better off with New Option 1, because of the shorter TT length...allowing me to run a bit longer stem?


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Option 1. Unless you were using a mile of spacers with the storck. Then you might have a problem with the decreased stack.

In addition to not wanting to increase the reach on what has you with a 80 stem option 2 has a 74 STA and you're already using no set back with a 75. Not a big deal there though, you'd just need to move the saddle forward of center on the rails by about 1cm which isn't a big problem but less than ideal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Option 1. Unless you were using a mile of spacers with the storck. Then you might have a problem with the decreased stack.

In addition to not wanting to increase the reach on what has you with a 80 stem option 2 has a 74 STA and you're already using no set back with a 75. Not a big deal there though, you'd just need to move the saddle forward of center on the rails by about 1cm which isn't a big problem but less than ideal.
I'm pretty sure there were 2 20mm spacers underneath, but I'm not absolutely certain on that size. Here is a pic that might help.

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Thanks. Does flipping the stem cause any issues with handling? Or is it more of an aesthetics thing?
Some people say they can tell some say they can't. It's a weight distribution thing not just an aesthetetics thing. Bikes with short top tubes are designed for a rider in an aggressive position and the corresponding weight distribution. Who knows if it'll f up the handling riding not in that position. Personally I think aggressive race bikes handle like crap if you ride in a more upright position thus not having enough weight over the front wheel. Other people say position doesn't matter.
But with so many bikes on the market why get anything but that which fits perfectly or pretty darn close?
 

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This may or may not mean anything in your case but I'll mention is anyway.
Is that Storck your first serious bike?
I had the same bike as my first serious riding bike and thought the geometry and handling was the end all be all. But now that I've had other bikes I have to say I was really wrong (for me) and would never go back to the storck geometry and handling. It was great while I had it but I should have been more open to there being other, greater, options out there and left it behind sooner.

For whatever that's worth.......if you're really comfortable with the fitter you mentioned it would probably be worth your while talking to him or her BEFORE getting a bike (as opposed to getting the bike seeing a fitter to make it work)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, the Storck was my first 'good' bike. I had an entry level alloy bike before that. I'm glad I decided to post this. Thanks so much for the help...much appreciated.
 

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Yes, the Storck was my first 'good' bike. I had an entry level alloy bike before that. I'm glad I decided to post this. Thanks so much for the help...much appreciated.
No problem.

yup, same story as me. Had an alloy bike then a storck. Not to say the Storck isn't best for you but personally I'm glad I left it behind despite at one time not being able to imagine anything being better.
To be more specific about my case. The Stock is/was amazing to do short-ish fast rides. No doubt about that. But I also do a lot of long distance rides and despite the storck geometry and handling being 'okay' for that I find my subsequent bikes to be much much better for longer rides.
If you're the type that hammers out short-ish rides as fast as you can only it very well could be that the storck geo and handling is best for you. But if your riding is more diverse I'd suggest there are greener pastures.
Good luck.
 

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Take this with a grain of salt as my knowledge of bike handling and fitment is still rather new. However as I understand it, your stack and reach relates to how the bike fits on you. If you choose a bike that has similar specs of those values, you will ride in a similar position.

This doesn't necessarily mean that bike will handle the roads and turns the same way though. How a bike handles has more to do with the trail of the bike, wheel base, bottom bracket drop and probably some other stuff too.

Maybe someone with more knowledge in fork rake, head tube angles, chainstay lengths might be able to chime in and give some further insight on how some of the values will affect how the bike handles.
 

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Take this with a grain of salt as my knowledge of bike handling and fitment is still rather new. However as I understand it, your stack and reach relates to how the bike fits on you. If you choose a bike that has similar specs of those values, you will ride in a similar position.

This doesn't necessarily mean that bike will handle the roads and turns the same way though. How a bike handles has more to do with the trail of the bike, wheel base, bottom bracket drop and probably some other stuff too.

Maybe someone with more knowledge in fork rake, head tube angles, chainstay lengths might be able to chime in and give some further insight on how some of the values will affect how the bike handles.
Stack and reach are a 'new measuring' technique that take into account more frame variables than listing 3 tube measurements and 2 angles (which most people have trouble with). It does not take into account stem/spacer/seatpost/setback/crank length/handlebars/etc. Therefore, i could have identical frames set up differently with different handling. Try putting upright bars on a racer and it handles differently.

your 'grain of salt' is bitterly inaccurate
 

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Stack and reach are a 'new measuring' technique that take into account more frame variables than listing 3 tube measurements and 2 angles (which most people have trouble with). It does not take into account stem/spacer/seatpost/setback/crank length/handlebars/etc. Therefore, i could have identical frames set up differently with different handling. Try putting upright bars on a racer and it handles differently.

your 'grain of salt' is bitterly inaccurate
That is why I quantified my statements. I do understand that fitment doesn't just depend on the frame's stack and reach and that stem/spacer/seatpost/setback/crank as you put it also plays into how a bike fits. However, my statements were to clarify that comparing stack/reach have more to do with the bike's fitment than comparing how a bike handles. Stack and reach doesn't compare how the fork's rake, chainstay length, bottom bracket drop affect the handling of a bike.

If you have a bike with the exact same stack, reach and seat angle, but chainstay is 20mm longer with a 40mm rake compare to a 45mm, I bet you it will handle completely differently. The contact points would be exactly the same (given same handlebars, stem, crank etc)

It might also just a be a matter of defining what handling means. Many will also define how a bike handles has to do with how the fitment is of a rider on a bike. In that sense, the stack and reach is definitely intertwined with handling. However, I don't usually equate how a bike fits to how it handles. If you take a bike that has a bunch of spacers and then removed them, did the handling of the bike change? The fitment did, and how the rider feels likely does, however the bike's geometry with how it contacts the road and the amount of steering trail it has is the same.
 
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