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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In trying to take road vibration out of my all-aluminum Schwinn Fastback, I have reached the point of considering wider, softer tires to improve ride comfort. I am looking for an inexpensive, durable set of tires, preferably folding. I have 25 mm Hutchinson tires on Mavic CXP22 rims, which are stock entry level hoops, and the Mavic site says that 28mm is the widest I can mount. What brand/model tire should I be looking at?
 

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I had a flat on the front wheel of my bike, and I was in a hurry so I just threw on the wheel from my fixie. The change from a 23 to a 32 was like night and day -- like floating on air. The change from a 25 to a 28 will probably be less dramatic, but may well be worth a shot. The 32 I used was a Panaracer Pasela. They make a 28 version in both folding and non-folding (I think there's a version with a kevlar strip for puncture resistance too). Depending on the options, I think they're in the $20 range. I can't comment on durability because I don't have that many miles on them, but they look to be holding up fine.
 

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slowmo1 said:
In trying to take road vibration out of my all-aluminum Schwinn Fastback, I have reached the point of considering wider, softer tires to improve ride comfort.
What pressure are you running? Do you ever get pinch flats? If no to the second question, you can reduce the pressure with the tires you have, and it could help a lot. With 28mm tires you should be able to run ~80 psi unless you are heavy.

I've heard that Paselas are good. You might also look at IRC Road Winners which are often on sale.
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?...rand=&sku=1897&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
rruff said:
What pressure are you running? Do you ever get pinch flats? If no to the second question, you can reduce the pressure with the tires you have, and it could help a lot. With 28mm tires you should be able to run ~80 psi unless you are heavy.

I've heard that Paselas are good. You might also look at IRC Road Winners which are often on sale.
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?...rand=&sku=1897&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=
I generally run about 108-110 psi, and have never had a flat. I am a major clydesdale at 328 lbs. So I want to be very careful about this decision. Thanks for the link!
 

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Use the widest tires you can fit on your bike at the lowest pressure to prevent pinch flats.

The frame will be the limiter on the size of tires, you can mount up to 32s on your rims. Continental 28s are pretty slim and may fit in the frame (GP4, etc.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Spunout said:
Use the widest tires you can fit on your bike at the lowest pressure to prevent pinch flats.

The frame will be the limiter on the size of tires, you can mount up to 32s on your rims. Continental 28s are pretty slim and may fit in the frame (GP4, etc.)
What is the best way to determine frame tolerances? Measure with calipers near the top of the fork? Also, how do you know I can mount 32s? Mavic said 28. I think 32s would be great, if they can fit and will match my rims.
 

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What is the best way to determine frame tolerances? Measure with calipers near the top of the fork?
Calipers are good, but a simple metric ruler will do. Don't forget to measure the seat stay clearance behind the bottom bracket as well. But even if you measure correctly, you still may find when mounting the tire that you have more clearance (rarely less) than you thought. The actual width of tires is sometimes misstated on the sidewall or in the ad, so you might have to find a good shop that lets you try and return a tire if needed.


Also, how do you know I can mount 32s? Mavic said 28. I think 32s would be great, if they can fit and will match my rims.
Mavic's chart is very conservative. Sheldon Brown's chart at the link below is less conservative, but still errs on the side of caution. As you can see, and as others have said here, your frame is the main limiter of what size tires you can use. (BTW, this is something that the folks from Rivendell Bicycles have been hammering away at for years. They feel that a good, light road bike should still offer the rider a wide range of tire width options - perhaps all the way to 700-37.) Below link is probably more than you ever wanted to know about tire sizing, but the chart towards the bottom is helpful.

http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
 
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