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I was thinking about switching to RED this fall, but cant affford the whole group as of now. So, I wanted to start with the shifters and work my way around when the funds show up. That being said, I currently have a DA/ULT setup and was wondering if the SRAM and Shimano are compatable with respects to the shifters being RED and the other components for the time being DA/ULT? I dont see why it would really matter, but I just wanted to toss a few feelers out there before I dropped $350 on some RED gear.

Thanks!
 

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won't work...

The SRAM shifter have a lot different cable pull and will not operate a Shimano RD. At the minimum, you have to match the shifters and RD. The cassette spacing is the same, so that is not an issue.

If you get a SRAM cassette at some point, note that it will not fit any of the deep-splined Shimano 10-speed-only hubs or wheels.
 

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C-40 said:
If you get a SRAM cassette at some point, note that it will not fit any of the deep-splined Shimano 10-speed-only hubs or wheels.
I'm looking at getting a Specialized Roubaix Comp, and it has Shimano RS-10 rims and hubs, and a SRAM cassette, is this because the RS-10 hubs are 8,9, or 10 speed compatible, and not specifically a Shimano 10-speed only hub?
 

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I have about 10 rides on my 2008 10sp DA drivetrain but the levers are so uncomfortable on my wrists I need an alternative soon. If I switch levers and derailleurs to SRAM can I keep my awesome DA crank, bb, and cassette and be worry free?
 

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epic_sunday said:
I have about 10 rides on my 2008 10sp DA drivetrain but the levers are so uncomfortable on my wrists I need an alternative soon. If I switch levers and derailleurs to SRAM can I keep my awesome DA crank, bb, and cassette and be worry free?
Yes, that'd work fine, but the levers aren't uncomfortable on your wrists.

The placement of the levers is uncomfortable on your wrists.

A few minutes working out fit problems is much cheaper than spending hundreds on components, only to discover that you have fit problems to work out.
 

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danl1 thanks for the rapid reply.
The first generation DA 10sp levers are mildly uncomfortable for me. The two issues I have with them is the thinness of the hood circumference and the 'swoopiness' of the hood shape (compared to Campy and SRAM). If I were to adjust the lever placement to overcome the swoopy hood shape (flat transition from bars to hoods) the bars would be so rotated up and the levers so high that out-of-the-saddle-on-the hoods position would be funky and unstable on steep hills. I have 20 years of road, mtn, and cx riding experience including two years of USPRO racing and for me ergonomics are the first priority. Additionally my wrists are sensitive due to my work as an arborist. I'm open to any suggestions. I've posted two pics, one of my Cannondale with DA levers and one of my wife's Look with Campy ergo levers (my personal all time favorite for all reasons). I'm going to end up using SRAM red for it's compatibility with Shimano drivetrains. I'm returning to racing and therefore need to think about shifting interchangeability with team wheels etc.
 

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I'm not sure I fully understand your complaint. If you like flat transitions (I don't, but understand why others do), flat pretty much equals flat, no matter the lever chosen. One lever will have different in-the-drops reach than another once that's set, but I don't see that as a wrist issue. The rounder or flatter crosswise shapes can affect hand comfort, and perhaps that leads to wrist discomfort, but I'm struggling for that connection. I don't understand your assertion about flat transitions and bar rotation leading to climbing position problems. I understand what you are saying, but not how that's unique to Shimano. More exactly, I mean that such an issue is about the particular combination of bars and levers, and to a certain extent stems (once the bar reach is extended.) Some bars work better than others with particular levers, and it might be that your problems is more with bars than with shifters. I hope this isn't about the bulbous end shape of Shimano, as those aren't especially made to be functional, just to provide cover for the mechanical design. Some folks grab up there as a cruising / comfort position, but it's not meant for riding at effort, and especially not for climbing. The intended position on Shimano isn't any different than for Campy or SRAM, though Shimano looks a lot more 'up' when they are positioned equally.

Perhaps a step back is in order. There really ought not be so much weight carried by your arms that this would be a particular problem. Obviously that statement is a bit generic, given that you have a particular issue with your wrists. But many try to acheive aerodynamic benefits incorrectly, putting more weight on hands than is necessary. I'm not saying that's you, just opening the possibility. And I don't mean to second-guess your experience - but a long and successful riding history doesn't guarantee a solid fit, particularly as age and injury take their toll. I was interested in a cyclingnews article noting that most pros had never been professionally fit, and despite their successes, many have adopted sub-optimal positions for their particular style and body type. Just to say, it might be time to have a fresh, independant look at your positioning.

One final thought: If it's Campy you like, by all means use it. I run Campy levers over a Shimano drivetrain, with one of the Jtek gadgets. In all honesty, I like the result better than either 'native' drivetrain. Yeah, that's personal, not everyone will agree, and some aren't OK with the jtek hanging out the end of their RD. But for me, it's function first, and I like what I have here. To be clear, I'm not anti-SRAM, either. If you want them, by all means get 'em. I just have a nagging feeling that if you are looking to them alone to correct what seem to be primarily positional issues, you may well end up disappointed.

Stepping WAY back, I could have my assumptions all wrong. If you are interested in the SRAM because of a reduced range of motion in shifting rather than a positional problem, they might be just the thing. But I'm not sure - I've never played with them with that constraint in mind.
 

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???

epic_sunday said:
I have about 10 rides on my 2008 10sp DA drivetrain but the levers are so uncomfortable on my wrists I need an alternative soon. If I switch levers and derailleurs to SRAM can I keep my awesome DA crank, bb, and cassette and be worry free?
A SRAM shifter and RD will shift correctly with a Shimano cassette. The crank should never be an issue, but can't comment on the FD compatibilty.

I have to agree with danl1 that the SRAM levers are not the answer for a wrist problem. More likely, the DA levers are not positioned properly, perhaps due to an incompatible handlebar, you have too much reach or drop. If anything, a brake hood that is angled up slightly, rather than horizontal, will improve comfort. I have my brake hood close to horizontal, but what that does is increase the bend at the wrist, not decrease it. That's one reason you see some pros (like Lance and Floyd) with some goofy looking upwardly angled brake hoods. The problem it creates is a huge reach from the hooks to the brake levers.

If you've got that much weight on your wrists it suggest other setup or fitness problems, like a saddle too far forward, maybe too much saddle to bar drop or perhaps a need to increase core strength. Placing the saddle too far forward is a common problem. So many brands sell nonsetback posts, that people have begun to think they are appropriate for a road bike, but that is rarely the case. With my saddle set back far enough I have very little weight on my hands, which allows me to tolerate a 12cm drop. With most saddle, I need a 32mm setback post, but get by with a 25mm model, with some longer railed saddles. I would never think of using a nonsetback post.
 
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