Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Couple questions:

1. When do you know the FD is cooked? (when is it time for a new one?)

2. Is there a seat post that allows for a very forward position?

I reversed my current one even reversed the seat clamp and filed a bit off to get a bit more fore/aft adjustment. My saddle is all the way forward too and still i'd like to go about 5mm further forward. (yes the bike is at least 1 size to big for me)
--
That'd be all for fow...
 

·
Doesn't like subtitles
Joined
·
3,808 Posts
It's pretty rare for an FD to give up the ghost and when it does it will be obvious like a broken spring or bent/broken cage plate. I suppose one of the bushings or pivots could wear out but pretty uncommon. The oldest FD in my bike collection is from 1983 and works fine.

Regarding seatpost, there are some made for time trial bikes with a forward bend. Some saddles have more room for fore/aft adjustment than others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,713 Posts
1. When do you know the FD is cooked? (when is it time for a new one?)
When it stops working (i.e., shifting) reliably. As hfc said, they don't really wear out fast. I have a road bike I bought in 1994 that I still ride a lot, and besides the frame and fork, the only original parts are the front hub and front derailleur. The FD has shown no sign of functional deterioration.
 

·
Doesn't like subtitles
Joined
·
3,808 Posts
Looks OK to me but I would replace it, that thing is ugly. (Sorry)

Are you having shifting problems?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looks OK to me but I would replace it, that thing is ugly. (Sorry)

Are you having shifting problems?
I did until I changed the cable and cable outers and readjusted the FD - now it shifts fine again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,637 Posts
A different question - how worn is that chain ring?
In the lower picture, look at the tooth at the top of the ring - essentially zero "shark fin" shape to the tooth. That means essentially zero wear. As to the subject of replacement, I would do it right away both from an aesthetics standpoint but more importantly because out-of-round chainrings have never demonstrated a sustained presence in the market because they don't really bring anything to the party. Just saying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
but more importantly because out-of-round chainrings have never demonstrated a sustained presence in the market because they don't really bring anything to the party. Just saying.
Well that's your opinion.

Mine differs after testing them and putting them in the right position.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,637 Posts
Well that's your opinion.
Nope. There's no question about the lack of credible evidence for out of round chain rings as a performance improver. They've been on and off the market for over 100 years and never gained a permanent foothold. Add to that the complete lack of credible research that supports your beliefs and the conclusion is unavoidable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They've been on and off the market for over 100 years and never gained a permanent foothold.
Well there have been various non-round chain rings but Rotor's Q Rings allow for adjustments in when the highest point of resistance in the pedal stroke is reached (OQP 1-5) which relates to the fore/aft of the cleat position aswell as the saddle height. The other non-round chain rings are like an aerobar that has 0 means of adjustability.

I say for that reason that Q Rings are here to stay.

QXL however have an ovality that doesn't seem to work for many ppl so I think they'll be pulled off the market at some point in the future.

As for science? I don't care as I first and foremost go by feel on the bike - what feels best stays.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top