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I've been riding and racing on Dura Ace for over 17 years. I've gone through over six iterations of the group and still even have my first set of brakes. My most recent group was 7800 and it still works fine, but is now being sold on Ebay.

I used to tell my friends all things being equal I wanted campy. Problem was, all things weren't equal. Shimano was just that much less expensive. It might not have looked the best, or the worst, but it worked and I didn't have to adjust too many items. Nothing I hated, but nothing I really loved.

Before I get into campy - a little about me as a rider. I raced CAT II, so I am/was fast, but not super strong. I have to travel for work and sometimes I bring my bike and do whatever group ride I can find. I've done this in CT, LA, NYC, Seattle and a few other places. I tend to keep to myself and prefer not to wear my team kit and just be there at the end and let me legs do the talking. At 6 foot 3 inches I'm a rider that everyone tries to get behind so I find myself in the front more often than I'd like.

Roadbike review exposed me to UK dealers who were selling campy. I get prices at coast, but most every year our team bike comes with Dura Ace. We can ride whatever we want, but typically a dale with dura ace is our best deal and it's hard to beat. When the dollar was getting stronger a few weeks ago campy chorus went down to $1,000 for the full group. Again, thanks to roadbike review I learned two things - first, Chorus was every bit the performance of record, just a difference in weight. second, that I could change me freehub. I worked in a shop for five years while in college and grad school, but that was in the 90s and back then whatever freehub you had is whatever freehub you had. My Ebay items go for a decent amount so I quickly did the math and made the purchase - full campy chorus for a thousand bucks. Lucky for me I did it, a few days later the us government decided to print a trillion dollars and the price went up almost 30%.

I was like a little kid waiting for presents. I always, always wanted campy and now I was going to get it. Soon after my order my packages came and I built up the bike. So, that's the story - how does it work compared to Dura Ace?

General Setup - The lack of protruding wires - soooooo much better. I hate the exposed cables and I think we will look back on the past 15 years and wonder why people had exposed cables. It's just sloppy, less friction, perhaps, sloppy - without question.

Shifting - The ability to dumpy on the downshift - i.e., five gears in one press of the down shifter - AWESOME. It really makes a difference when, for example, you are in the 53x21 and you shift to the 39x16 in one flick of each shifter. On dura ace that's a lot of shifting on the rear derailleur. I ride with power, so training rides mean lots of shifting and, as we all know, there are times you need to shift from the 53 to the 39 and you just don't and power over the small riser or whatever. With this setup, I just dump and don't miss a beat. I love it.

11 speed and ergonomics - The ergonomics on the levers - while they look funny in pictures, are awesome. I would venture to say they are the best of the three. It's still a flat surface, which is what I liked on campy over shimano, but now you have something to aid you when you really grab a hold. Whatever they did, it works. And, yea, we don't need 11 anymore than we need 10 or 9 or even 8, but it's that much tighter on each shift.

Braking - The modulation on campy brakes versus the shear power of dura ace - much better. It's like ABS, the other might be "stronger" but the modulation is better and safer. My bike lost like over a pound and for the first time it actually feels kinda light for a 60cm frame.

Looks of the group - top notch. The lack of exposed cables, the hollow holes on the record chain, the cranks and chrome brakes - it's all gorgeous.

The downside - As indicated since the downshift is so awesome, from the 53 to 39 and the 23 to the 11, the upshift is way harder and stiffer than dura ace. This is problematic only when you're really tired and you just wont want to do it. Again, in a race if you're that tired, you aren't going to win, but I can see how it might suck. I did a ride the other day and got caught in a downpour with 20 miles to go and 48 degrees (yea, I know - should have checked). I had to TT is back and being soaked, cold and tired I didn't want to shift as it was just so stiff. Also, since the shift lever itself moves around so easily before engaging it just leaves me searching for a hold. Even though the ace lever could move, I never had that issue.

So, what's the verdict - I'm sold. I'm going to stay with campy and am very happy with the purchase. In fact, some of my team mates are looking to do the same thing. We're guys who have been into racing since 1990 or earlier. We're also aficionados as much as anything else, but we still need performance. Campy has hit it out of the park with Chorus 11. I hope to be sticking with campy for now on. I may have to go back to ace, but for now, my bet would be if I did it was only due to economics.

Here's a pic of the setup. I am getting my Mavic Cosmic powertap later this week.
 

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I made the switch from DA in 1999. I was still riding eight speed and was trying to make up my mind about upgrading to nine speed. I was riding a Litespeed Classic and wanted a classic steel frame that fit my riding style. I ended up with an Eddy Merckx MX Leader and decided it was time to upgrade to Campy nine. I bought a Chorus build kit from Excel sports with CPX33 wheels and a Record crank. Through the years I upgraded to ten speed although my commuter is still nine. I never regretted the decision.

When I upgraded to 11 speed this year, I bought a Chorus group with a Record crank.
 

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I made the switch back in 2001. I finally decided to get a new bike, a custom ti rig by Rich Gangl of Golden, CO.

I had a mid range Ciocc that I had purchased while I was stationed in Germany in 1984. It was a sweet bike built with Shimano 600. Over the years I upgraded it to Dura-ace...but I was never really happy with it. I always seemed to be adjusting/tweaking every week just to get decent shifting.

With the new ti bike coming I figured I might as well make the jump. So I got 2001 Record 10 spd and haven't looked back. It shifts perfectly and smoothly every time and I don't need to constantly adjust it. Just set it and forget it. The only upgrade I've made to my Gangl is the addition of a 07 carbon Chorus Ultra-torque compact crankset and new Record front derailleur. I love that bike.

I just outfitted my new Look 595 Ultra (07 model) with Super Record 11 spd and Shamal Ultra 2 way fit wheels. I am now considering upgrading my Gangl to Record 11 spd.

Campagnolo equipment just looks gorgeous and performs always! I've seen many friends and riding partners have to replace their nearly new Shmano shifters after 6 months of use...I go on a lot of rides and I always see Shimano support vehicles...it really makes you wonder.

Bikes, Welcome to the world of Campagnolo. They say, once you go Italian...
 

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That's a beautiful build. White C/dales are cool. Welcome to chorus - and 'the light!'
 

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Beautiful Bike

Is that a Deda Zero100 bar? Upgraded my shifters to Campy Centaur 09 for the new ergonomics (by far THE MOST COMFORTABLE shifters I've wrapped my hand around).

IMO Zero100 was designed for Campy's new shape, the curves & reach are absolutly spot-on when mated to the levers. Was very close to getting the 3T stuff (I'm on a Cervelo & the price was hard to beat), until I read somewhere they were designed around STI levers.

If your using the DEDAs I was just wondering if that's what you've found to be true.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
jpdigital said:
Is that a Deda Zero100 bar?

If your using the DEDAs I was just wondering if that's what you've found to be true.
It is the Deda Elementi Supernatural Handlebar - which supposedly was designed for shimano 7800 shifters. I like deda as they are stiff and the weight is fine. Mounting these shifters don't seem to be an issue, but I have big hands too, so reaching the thumb shifter from drops or hood isn't a problem. I mounted them so that it was flat from the tops to the hoods and it's very comfy. 7800 shifters never went flat no matter the bar.

I might go back to FSA K-wing only inasmuch as the white handle bar tape gets dirty so quickly. I had those bars and liked them fine, though they aren't as stiff as deda.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chris Keller said:
I It shifts perfectly and smoothly every time and I don't need to constantly adjust it. Just set it and forget it. The only upgrade I've made to my Gangl is the addition of a 07 carbon Chorus Ultra-torque compact crankset and new Record front derailleur. I love that bike.

Bikes, Welcome to the world of Campagnolo. They say, once you go Italian...
You're not kidding on the shifting. I just rode my rollers and did an over under session. I will be in the 53 x 19 and then go to the 53 x 14 and then back to the 53 x 19 - on shimano you do a lot of shifts to get there and the gear falls into place. That's fine, but on rollers it kind of made you pause ever so slightly - or back off, engage the proper gear and then go. On campy - it's like a car transmission, it just slams into gear and that's with one shift on the thumb shifter. I didn't back off a fraction. AWESOME.

I think I'm sold for life and am happy to be in the club!!!!
 

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bikesarethenewblack said:
I've been riding and racing on Dura Ace for over 17 years. I've gone through over six iterations of the group and still even have my first set of brakes. My most recent group was 7800 and it still works fine, but is now being sold on Ebay.

I used to tell my friends all things being equal I wanted campy. Problem was, all things weren't equal. Shimano was just that much less expensive. It might not have looked the best, or the worst, but it worked and I didn't have to adjust too many items. Nothing I hated, but nothing I really loved.

Before I get into campy - a little about me as a rider. I raced CAT II, so I am/was fast, but not super strong. I have to travel for work and sometimes I bring my bike and do whatever group ride I can find. I've done this in CT, LA, NYC, Seattle and a few other places. I tend to keep to myself and prefer not to wear my team kit and just be there at the end and let me legs do the talking. At 6 foot 3 inches I'm a rider that everyone tries to get behind so I find myself in the front more often than I'd like.

Roadbike review exposed me to UK dealers who were selling campy. I get prices at coast, but most every year our team bike comes with Dura Ace. We can ride whatever we want, but typically a dale with dura ace is our best deal and it's hard to beat. When the dollar was getting stronger a few weeks ago campy chorus went down to $1,000 for the full group. Again, thanks to roadbike review I learned two things - first, Chorus was every bit the performance of record, just a difference in weight. second, that I could change me freehub. I worked in a shop for five years while in college and grad school, but that was in the 90s and back then whatever freehub you had is whatever freehub you had. My Ebay items go for a decent amount so I quickly did the math and made the purchase - full campy chorus for a thousand bucks. Lucky for me I did it, a few days later the us government decided to print a trillion dollars and the price went up almost 30%.

I was like a little kid waiting for presents. I always, always wanted campy and now I was going to get it. Soon after my order my packages came and I built up the bike. So, that's the story - how does it work compared to Dura Ace?

General Setup - The lack of protruding wires - soooooo much better. I hate the exposed cables and I think we will look back on the past 15 years and wonder why people had exposed cables. It's just sloppy, less friction, perhaps, sloppy - without question.

Shifting - The ability to dumpy on the downshift - i.e., five gears in one press of the down shifter - AWESOME. It really makes a difference when, for example, you are in the 53x21 and you shift to the 39x16 in one flick of each shifter. On dura ace that's a lot of shifting on the rear derailleur. I ride with power, so training rides mean lots of shifting and, as we all know, there are times you need to shift from the 53 to the 39 and you just don't and power over the small riser or whatever. With this setup, I just dump and don't miss a beat. I love it.

11 speed and ergonomics - The ergonomics on the levers - while they look funny in pictures, are awesome. I would venture to say they are the best of the three. It's still a flat surface, which is what I liked on campy over shimano, but now you have something to aid you when you really grab a hold. Whatever they did, it works. And, yea, we don't need 11 anymore than we need 10 or 9 or even 8, but it's that much tighter on each shift.

Braking - The modulation on campy brakes versus the shear power of dura ace - much better. It's like ABS, the other might be "stronger" but the modulation is better and safer. My bike lost like over a pound and for the first time it actually feels kinda light for a 60cm frame.

Looks of the group - top notch. The lack of exposed cables, the hollow holes on the record chain, the cranks and chrome brakes - it's all gorgeous.

The downside - As indicated since the downshift is so awesome, from the 53 to 39 and the 23 to the 11, the upshift is way harder and stiffer than dura ace. This is problematic only when you're really tired and you just wont want to do it. Again, in a race if you're that tired, you aren't going to win, but I can see how it might suck. I did a ride the other day and got caught in a downpour with 20 miles to go and 48 degrees (yea, I know - should have checked). I had to TT is back and being soaked, cold and tired I didn't want to shift as it was just so stiff. Also, since the shift lever itself moves around so easily before engaging it just leaves me searching for a hold. Even though the ace lever could move, I never had that issue.

So, what's the verdict - I'm sold. I'm going to stay with campy and am very happy with the purchase. In fact, some of my team mates are looking to do the same thing. We're guys who have been into racing since 1990 or earlier. We're also aficionados as much as anything else, but we still need performance. Campy has hit it out of the park with Chorus 11. I hope to be sticking with campy for now on. I may have to go back to ace, but for now, my bet would be if I did it was only due to economics.

Here's a pic of the setup. I am getting my Mavic Cosmic powertap later this week.
I too made the switch from 7800 to record 11. I agree with most everything you've said--even the negative. Incidentally, I've found the combination of campy 11 brifters and 7800 calipers to offer the best of both worlds.

When tired and trying to shift into the big ring on 7800 I would sometimes inadvertantly apply a little brake. I like the campy front shifting process better.

Most of all, I like the 2 tooth jumps from 21 through 27 (12/27) as opposed to 3's on shimano. This really makes a difference to me on sustained, slightly variable climbs.

One other thing I'd add. I've found that the lever position vertically on the bar is really critical on Campy verses somewhat critical on 7800.
 

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If you're worried about the white tape getting dirty, try the Fizik Microtex stuff. It's what I use and it does an increadible job of not getting dirty. Very durable as well.

Also Deda's got a Zero100 bar/stem in white (and as I posted, feels like it was designed around the new Campy stuff)---just in case you like the Deda's stiffness.
 

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bikesarethenewblack said:
It is the Deda Elementi Supernatural Handlebar - which supposedly was designed for shimano 7800 shifters. I like deda as they are stiff and the weight is fine. Mounting these shifters don't seem to be an issue, but I have big hands too, so reaching the thumb shifter from drops or hood isn't a problem. I mounted them so that it was flat from the tops to the hoods and it's very comfy. 7800 shifters never went flat no matter the bar.

I might go back to FSA K-wing only inasmuch as the white handle bar tape gets dirty so quickly. I had those bars and liked them fine, though they aren't as stiff as deda.
FYI if you're looking at the FSA K-WIng handlebars (black), I ordered my second pair yesterday from Wiggle in the UK - $154.

Glad to hear you're enjoying Campy - perhaps someday I'll give it a chance :) Bike's looking great!
 

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Nice Caad 9 set up and I will have my SR11 ready by next week on a System Six. I made the switch on 2003 to Campy Record 10, can't wait to get on the SR11.
 

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I have been too lazy to make a new post so I will just glom on to this one....I made the jump from 7800 to Record 10 for my new Colnago C50 build. Something about Shimano on a Colnago just didn't seem right to me and I've always wanted to ride Campy but just couldn't justify it. Now that I only have the C50 and a vintage Merckx with period correct Shimano 7400, I felt like it was time to take the plunge.

I built it up myself and some of you provided valuble insight during the build when I had questions. It took a bit of tweaking to get the derailleurs in tune, but probably no more than it took me the first time I wrenched Shimano either.

I've put in several good rides and from the second I swung a leg over the bike I have been blown away by the performance of the Record gruppo. I've always heard that Campy shifted much "clunkier", but I think it actually shifts like shifting should.....nice and solid. Maybe the Shimano shift was a little crisper but the Campy shifting is absolutely flawless and silent. The carbon front and rear cage is clearly stiffer as shifts happen instantaneously and without any annoying chain drag on the cassette/chainrings.

Overall I couldn't be happier and wish I'd have made the jump years ago. Now I just have to decide whether I keep the old Shimano intact on the Merckx or swap it for a nice silver Centaur 10 gruppo :)
 
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