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When I was watchin the time trial today I couldn't help but notice that Alberto keep pushing himself to the back of the saddle after a few revolutions of the pedals. One of the commentators mentioned that he was pulling himself forward with his pedaling motion. It looked like he was sliding forward and correcting this. Could it be that the nose of the saddle was too far down, or that the mechanic messed up, or that something slipped? Is this Alberto's riding style in a time trail?
 

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looked like he was sliding down to me too. on another thread i saw a comment that he always does this. looked v strange i thought.
 

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Exactly! I also thought this was very distracting. I am sure it took some concentration off the pedaling for AC. Weird...

It seems to me the seat nose was a tad low...
 

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He was pulling forward on the saddle to generate more power (this is were the term 'on the rivet comes from when riders used leather saddles). He would push back from time to time, probably, to get a bit more comfortable.
 

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A lot of guys do this. Andy was doing it too today. I've seen Spartacus do this too. It's almost like a rhythm while they are pedaling. If you watch closely, some of them do that after the same amount of pedal revs each time.
Seems to work pretty well, so...:idea:
 

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check out this video...guy thats a TT fit specialist talks about contador and other riders doing it and the reason why.

the reasons are because of the UCI limit on saddle position they can't get their saddles forward enough and end up doing this "shuffle"

it also changes their saddle height moving that far up and back according to the vid.

Chad
 

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mattpnewell
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alberto is a smaller rider, shorter legs, and the uci has a rule about the saddle being behind the bb by a certain measurement. he slides forward to get over the bb, but has to readjust to get back on the saddle. a little weird, but necessary for some riders to be able to sit on the saddle and pedal. taller rides don't have to do it quite as often.
 

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I actually do it myself for the same reasons, but am nowhere near their/his level. It's not so bothersome despite the effort to "reset". There are times where I look to be in a position for my legs to extend a bit more (rearward) momentarily, then I settle back into what feels like my fastest.

You could say that on hillclimbs, AC does it there as well, sitting only momentarily unless everyone's going a (sub-)tempo pace. As far as I understand it, lighter riders - whether they're pro or just plain 'ol me (I'm 135lbs) - prefer being forward or off the saddle.
 

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Alberto needs to get one of those Prologo saddles with the ribs on it. Fabian used one for a while and it helped to keep him back a bit. For AC it seems more noticable this year, noticed it at Paris Nice, not sure if it happens more on the Specialized than the Trek bikes, the top tube may be longer or he has changed his reach.
 

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Albert Owen
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I could be wrong, but didn't HTC carry on using Giants for a while after they switched to Scott last year because they didn't like the new position? I do remember Cav putting mudguards on his Scott as well, which was pretty funny.

Maybe Contador + Spesh isn't as good a fit as when he was a Trecky. Andy was shuffling a bit as well.

Naturally, the Pinarello Boys looked comfy enough ;-)
 

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Hucken The Fard Up !
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I have seen videos of his TTs on the Treks and he looks much more powerful and much less saddle slip.

Since the change to Specialized, Conti has not been comfortable on those bikes.

He was the only one I have seen on ski style aero bar extensions too. why ?

And look him here training.... no saddle slip, weid

 

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your text here
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I was gonna start this thread after the tour was over. I saw those two vids yesterday when I was searching for videos of him TTing on a Trek and was planning on posting them up. I have seen others do it, but don't recall anyone do it to this extreme. I understand moving around a bit on the saddle, but his rhythm is pretty frequent.

Then again, what do we know? He has a team that watches and coaches this stuff. The tell will be next year.
 

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Nimitz said:
the reasons are because of the UCI limit on saddle position they can't get their saddles forward enough and end up doing this "shuffle"
That's one rule I wish the UCI would change. A rider should be able to be comfortable (reasonably) and still be able to lay the power down.
 

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Salsa_Lover said:
I have seen videos of his TTs on the Treks and he looks much more powerful and much less saddle slip.

Since the change to Specialized, Conti has not been comfortable on those bikes.

He was the only one I have seen on ski style aero bar extensions too. why ?

And look him here training.... no saddle slip, weid

UCI rules say you can't use those bends during races. I assume that training day was emphasizing his legs over upper body form, and he took advantage of that leeway because straight bars are quite a pain for most riders.
 

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AJL said:
That's one rule I wish the UCI would change. A rider should be able to be comfortable (reasonably) and still be able to lay the power down.
I agree...I have short femurs/legs for my height and would never conform to their rules of saddle setback because of it.

and that's not even on a time trial bike with the more forward position.

Chad
 

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Nimitz said:
I agree...I have short femurs/legs for my height and would never conform to their rules of saddle setback because of it
A rider can apply for a "morphological exception" if his customary saddle position is too forward to meet the UCI rule. To get the exception, the rider must pass a morphology test. But basically, no one over 5' 6" with statistically "normal" leg length can pass this test.
 

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wim said:
A rider can apply for a "morphological exception" if his customary saddle position is too forward to meet the UCI rule. To get the exception, the rider must pass a morphology test. But basically, no one over 5' 6" and with a statistically "normal" leg length can pass this test.

ooh so I guess I could do that when I turn pro:thumbsup: lol

I'm assuming most triathlons/TT events don't test ?

I'm 6'4 but built like Michael Phelps basically...34" cycling inseam with short femurs.

Chad
 

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Nimitz said:
ooh so I guess I could do that when I turn pro:thumbsup: lol

I'm assuming most triathlons/TT events don't test ?

I'm 6'4 but built like Michael Phelps basically...34" cycling inseam with short femurs.

Chad
Well, these "pro" rules are slowly filtering down into the amateur side of the sport. But triathlon organizations (and someone correct me if I'm wrong) don't care one whit about UCI regs like the 5 cm rule discussed here.
 
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