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Can anyone provide recommendation for tire/inner tube combination for 2021 TCR advanced 2 disc? I am looking to move away from factory tubeless system. Thanks in advance
 

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looking at the specs of this bike here:

..it came with 25c tires setup tubeless.

So, you could just use 25mm tires front and back with Continental race butyl tubes (or any race butyl tubes).
Or if you prefer a bit more comfy ride, or if you're heavier than 160 lbs, then go with 25mm tire up front and 28mm tire out back. If you're 175+ lbs, then go with 28mm tires front and back. Don't go bigger than 28mm tire as anything bigger than 28mm will feel slow and soft (not for fast racing on street tarmac).

Also, get a SOFTER tire for the front, like those tires designated as "corsa" types (eg, Vittoria Corsa, Veloflex Corsa, etc). And get a harder tire for the rear, like Continental 5000, or even the heavier one Vittoria Rubino Graphene. You do not want to get a soft "corsa" type tire for the rear, no matter how big the size, because you'll end up wearing the corsa tires out fast on the rear.

28mm tires will last longer, wears slower, than 25mm tires.
 

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Don't go bigger than 28mm tire as anything bigger than 28mm will feel slow and soft (not for fast racing on street tarmac).
It might FEEL slower but there are plenty of studies showing that for a compliant casing tire, it won't BE slower. The FEEL faster mindset is how we got to running 120 psi with narrow road tires at the expense of traction, comfort, and tire wear with zero benefit for speed.
 

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It might FEEL slower but there are plenty of studies showing that for a compliant casing tire, it won't BE slower. The FEEL faster mindset is how we got to running 120 psi with narrow road tires at the expense of traction, comfort, and tire wear with zero benefit for speed.
Yup. You feel faster when you're bouncing like a bucking bronco.

TBO, I cannot tell a difference in speed between 25mm and 28mm tires. I do notice 28's have a nicer ride. Nor can I tell a difference in comfort or speed between Vittoria Rubinos and Corsas.
 

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It might FEEL slower but there are plenty of studies showing that for a compliant casing tire, it won't BE slower. The FEEL faster mindset is how we got to running 120 psi with narrow road tires at the expense of traction, comfort, and tire wear with zero benefit for speed.
well bigger volume (>28c) tires will roll with the same or even slightly better efficiency in a lab, under stead state. However, if you air up a 28c to a pressure that it'll outroll a 25c, then the 28c won't feel as comfortable as the guy airing it to a lower psi.

But real world riding is almost never steady state. Riders do not roll squarely on the bottom of a tire like on a drum. They're yaw'ing and rocking side to side as the pedal, elbow, leaning a bit here and there using body english. It's almost never like rolling on a drum. In a crit, or in a climb with lots of out of saddle efforts, you don't want squishy tires. Anyone who has sprinted with a 32c+ will tell you, it's complete shit. And no, we're not talking 21-23c tires with 120-150 psi anymore these days, who does. We're talking 25c at 75-85 psi versus 28c at 65-75 psi, and deciding which is best for a road course. Anyway, all the crit racers around here, from 140 lbs all the way to 200 lbs, many have all tried various combination of 25c, 28c, and even 32c tires, and so far I'm hearing mostly that 25-28c is the sweet spot. Starting from 32c it's just slow rolling and slower handling. The issue with tires bigger than 32c is that these tires tend to be thick, people who buy 32c tires buy them for gravel, and as such, they're thick. Manufacturers don't make 32c+ tire with thin casing, they just don't because nobody will buy a soft and thinly cased 32+c tire. I'm in the Los Angles area, lots of crit racers, some of the fastest sprinters in the nation, telling me their experience. We also have a lot of guys (strong guys) here who are mtb cat1 racers who fancy to use their gravel bikes, with 35-38c tires, to train with the local cat1-2 roadies on mock crits, guess what, mtb guys will get dropped when the peloton is upping their speed to 28-29 mph and/or hammering 800-1000+w out of every 2-3 corners, reaching 33-35 mph. Any effort that is hard and stochasitc, the gravel bike guys will go bye bye in a few efforts later.
 

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The issue with tires bigger than 32c is that these tires tend to be thick, people who buy 32c tires buy them for gravel, and as such, they're thick. Manufacturers don't make 32c+ tire with thin casing, they just don't because nobody will buy a soft and thinly cased 32+c tire.
Wrong:

 

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Manufacturers don't make 32c+ tire with thin casing, they just don't because nobody will buy a soft and thinly cased 32+c tire.
Really wrong.
The GP5000, Corsa, and the Pro One are three of the most popular thin casing tires. And all available in 32c

 

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well bigger volume (>28c) tires will roll with the same or even slightly better efficiency in a lab, under stead state. However, if you air up a 28c to a pressure that it'll outroll a 25c, then the 28c won't feel as comfortable as the guy airing it to a lower psi.

But real world riding is almost never steady state. Riders do not roll squarely on the bottom of a tire like on a drum. They're yaw'ing and rocking side to side as the pedal, elbow, leaning a bit here and there using body english. It's almost never like rolling on a drum. In a crit, or in a climb with lots of out of saddle efforts, you don't want squishy tires. Anyone who has sprinted with a 32c+ will tell you, it's complete shit. And no, we're not talking 21-23c tires with 120-150 psi anymore these days, who does. We're talking 25c at 75-85 psi versus 28c at 65-75 psi, and deciding which is best for a road course. Anyway, all the crit racers around here, from 140 lbs all the way to 200 lbs, many have all tried various combination of 25c, 28c, and even 32c tires, and so far I'm hearing mostly that 25-28c is the sweet spot. Starting from 32c it's just slow rolling and slower handling. The issue with tires bigger than 32c is that these tires tend to be thick, people who buy 32c tires buy them for gravel, and as such, they're thick. Manufacturers don't make 32c+ tire with thin casing, they just don't because nobody will buy a soft and thinly cased 32+c tire. I'm in the Los Angles area, lots of crit racers, some of the fastest sprinters in the nation, telling me their experience. We also have a lot of guys (strong guys) here who are mtb cat1 racers who fancy to use their gravel bikes, with 35-38c tires, to train with the local cat1-2 roadies on mock crits, guess what, mtb guys will get dropped when the peloton is upping their speed to 28-29 mph and/or hammering 800-1000+w out of every 2-3 corners, reaching 33-35 mph. Any effort that is hard and stochasitc, the gravel bike guys will go bye bye in a few efforts later.
Wrong.
 

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well bigger volume (>28c) tires will roll with the same or even slightly better efficiency in a lab, under stead state. However, if you air up a 28c to a pressure that it'll outroll a 25c, then the 28c won't feel as comfortable as the guy airing it to a lower psi.

But real world riding is almost never steady state. Riders do not roll squarely on the bottom of a tire like on a drum. They're yaw'ing and rocking side to side as the pedal, elbow, leaning a bit here and there using body english. It's almost never like rolling on a drum. In a crit, or in a climb with lots of out of saddle efforts, you don't want squishy tires. Anyone who has sprinted with a 32c+ will tell you, it's complete shit. And no, we're not talking 21-23c tires with 120-150 psi anymore these days, who does. We're talking 25c at 75-85 psi versus 28c at 65-75 psi, and deciding which is best for a road course. Anyway, all the crit racers around here, from 140 lbs all the way to 200 lbs, many have all tried various combination of 25c, 28c, and even 32c tires, and so far I'm hearing mostly that 25-28c is the sweet spot. Starting from 32c it's just slow rolling and slower handling. The issue with tires bigger than 32c is that these tires tend to be thick, people who buy 32c tires buy them for gravel, and as such, they're thick. Manufacturers don't make 32c+ tire with thin casing, they just don't because nobody will buy a soft and thinly cased 32+c tire. I'm in the Los Angles area, lots of crit racers, some of the fastest sprinters in the nation, telling me their experience. We also have a lot of guys (strong guys) here who are mtb cat1 racers who fancy to use their gravel bikes, with 35-38c tires, to train with the local cat1-2 roadies on mock crits, guess what, mtb guys will get dropped when the peloton is upping their speed to 28-29 mph and/or hammering 800-1000+w out of every 2-3 corners, reaching 33-35 mph. Any effort that is hard and stochasitc, the gravel bike guys will go bye bye in a few efforts later.

Not what the data show in the real world (not on lab rollers). Suggest you get a subscription to Bicycle Quarterly and learn about the extensive research in this area. They have been leaders in providing the field data that has led to the transition from 19-21 mm tires to 28-30 mm tires in the pro peloton. Of course there is a weight penalty for ever-bigger tires and that shows up when you are constantly jumping speeds, though that extra energy is returned to the rider because heavier wheels/tires don't slow down as fast when you let off on the pedal pressure. Wider tires have different pneumatic trail and so there comes a point where the bike needs to be designed differently to get the best performance on wider tires. Rene Herse' has a wide selection of wider tires with very compliant casings and those tires are winning lots of gravel events. Anybody who rides a gravel bike in a crit should expect to lose. Horses for courses.
 

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Not what the data show in the real world (not on lab rollers). Suggest you get a subscription to Bicycle Quarterly and learn about the extensive research in this area. They have been leaders in providing the field data that has led to the transition from 19-21 mm tires to 28-30 mm tires in the pro peloton. Of course there is a weight penalty for ever-bigger tires and that shows up when you are constantly jumping speeds, though that extra energy is returned to the rider because heavier wheels/tires don't slow down as fast when you let off on the pedal pressure. Wider tires have different pneumatic trail and so there comes a point where the bike needs to be designed differently to get the best performance on wider tires. Rene Herse' has a wide selection of wider tires with very compliant casings and those tires are winning lots of gravel events. Anybody who rides a gravel bike in a crit should expect to lose. Horses for courses.
There is the real world and then there is @aclinjury 's world. Very different worlds. FWIW, it looks like he got a posting vacation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
looking at the specs of this bike here: ..it came with 25c tires setup tubeless. So, you could just use 25mm tires front and back with Continental race butyl tubes (or any race butyl tubes). Or if you prefer a bit more comfy ride, or if you're heavier than 160 lbs, then go with 25mm tire up front and 28mm tire out back. If you're 175+ lbs, then go with 28mm tires front and back. Don't go bigger than 28mm tire as anything bigger than 28mm will feel slow and soft (not for fast racing on street tarmac). Also, get a SOFTER tire for the front, like those tires designated as "corsa" types (eg, Vittoria Corsa, Veloflex Corsa, etc). And get a harder tire for the rear, like Continental 5000, or even the heavier one Vittoria Rubino Graphene. You do not want to get a soft "corsa" type tire for the rear, no matter how big the size, because you'll end up wearing the corsa tires out fast on the rear. 28mm tires will last longer, wears slower, than 25mm tires.
Thank you for the information. My hesitation is the bike has hook-less-sidewall rims & apparently it's recommended to still use tubeless-compatible tyres for bead profile. This seems to be a limitation with this particular model. I could just put in an inner tube but other reviews indicate the current stock tire is very difficult to take off/on & reseat especially on the road. Thanks for your help.
 

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Thank you for the information. My hesitation is the bike has hook-less-sidewall rims & apparently it's recommended to still use tubeless-compatible tyres for bead profile. This seems to be a limitation with this particular model. I could just put in an inner tube but other reviews indicate the current stock tire is very difficult to take off/on & reseat especially on the road. Thanks for your help.
Well this changes the story. I don't believe hookless rims can be used with tubes.
 

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Well this changes the story. I don't believe hookless rims can be used with tubes.
Sure they can. Any tire can be used with a tube. Giant even says so.
You can only use hookless tires on hookless rims.

If necessary, you may use an inner tube on a Giant hookless rim, so long as the tire you are using has passed the Giant test protocol. However, please note that Giant hookless rims are designed to perform best when set up as tubeless and used without an inner tube.

Yes

Yes, you can! But you must only do this in a tubeless-ready tire that is safe for use on hookless rims

Thank you for the information. My hesitation is the bike has hook-less-sidewall rims & apparently it's recommended to still use tubeless-compatible tyres for bead profile. This seems to be a limitation with this particular model.
I don't think anyone makes a tube specific hookles tires. The whole purpose of them is to run tubeless at lower pressures.
And remember... hookless tires usually have a maximum pressure of 72.5psi (5 bar)

Honestly, if you're intent on using tubes, I'd get rid of the wheels and get hooked rims.
You're not going to get great performance from a hookless tire with a tube in it.
 

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Sure they can. Any tire can be used with a tube. Giant even says so.
You can only use hookless tires on hookless rims.

If necessary, you may use an inner tube on a Giant hookless rim, so long as the tire you are using has passed the Giant test protocol. However, please note that Giant hookless rims are designed to perform best when set up as tubeless and used without an inner tube.

Yes

Yes, you can! But you must only do this in a tubeless-ready tire that is safe for use on hookless rims

I don't think anyone makes a tube specific hookles tires. The whole purpose of them is to run tubeless at lower pressures.
And remember... hookless tires usually have a maximum pressure of 72.5psi (5 bar)

Honestly, if you're intent on using tubes, I'd get rid of the wheels and get hooked rims.
You're not going to get great performance from a hookless tire with a tube in it.
I stand corrected.
 
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