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You need a new 11t lockring and an 11t outer cog. That'll change just the 12 to an 11. But it will leave a big gap between the 11 and 13 cogs. That probably won't shift well. So you'd be best to replace the 13t second to outer with a 12 (the outer and second to outer are special shaped cogs). Then you'll also need to replace the 14t normal cog with a 13t.

With that many single cogs it may be cheaper to buy an 11-23 cassette than to buy solo cogs.
 

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RoadLoad said:
I want to do the same thing. Will an 11 tooth cog from a 9 speed cassette fit with a 10 speed cassette or are the cogs just different enough to not work smoothly if I mix and match?
The space between cogs are different from a 9 speed and 10 speed and since the outer most cogs have a lip inplace that acts as a spacer, they will probably not be identical. Not sure if it is a big enough difference to cause shifting issues.
 

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Matnlely Dregaend
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Al1943 said:
The problem with adding an 11 is that you have to give up a better cog somewhere else.
Big deal, you've given up the 18 already! :cool:
 

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The idea of an 11-27 is a contradiction. It says that you are strong enough to throw down an 11, but still weak enough to need a 27, but still strong enough not to need the missing gears.
Go figure.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Potato Masher

MR_GRUMPY said:
The idea of an 11-27 is a contradiction. It says that you are strong enough to throw down an 11, but still weak enough to need a 27, but still strong enough not to need the missing gears.
Go figure.
My exact thoughts too. Probably needs an 11t because they can't spin the cranks over 60rpm. Won't miss the 16t or 18t cog because they are pedaling so slow and it doesnt matter if you have closely spaced ratios.
 

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MR_GRUMPY said:
The idea of an 11-27 is a contradiction. It says that you are strong enough to throw down an 11, but still weak enough to need a 27, but still strong enough not to need the missing gears.
Go figure.
In Colorado, I have lost several places in races because I was spun out on mountain descents in my 12T. If I had an 11T I probably would have been able to keep up.

I have a 12-26 and use the 26T plenty on 7%+ climbs, which are common and several miles long.

I could easily see a bigger TT-type guy using a 27T and then descending like a demon in the 11T.
 

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Once spinning up to about 38/39 mph, I find that I can go faster downhill by tucking in, and keeping my feet at 3 and 9 o'clock. Spinning an 11 will only get you to 43 mph. Your legs flailing around will add more than enough air resistance to negate any advantage of an 11.
11's were not invented for going downhill. They were invented for sprinting massive gears.
 

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53/12 110 rpm: 38 mph 120 rpm: 41.4 mph
53/11 110 rpm: 41.4 mph 120 rpm: 45.2 mph

One wouldn't expect to spin 120 rpm for very long. Basically, spin like crazy for a few seconds, aero tuck in behind a bigger guy. Spin again when he starts to get a gap. Repeat.

Twice now I've been competing for a top ten placing. Got gapped on a 40+ mph descent while spun out. Resulted in cycling last 10-15 miles alone into a headwind and losing a bunch of places.

11T is also very useful for sections of strong tailwind, especially in time trials and/or where there is a slight negative grade.

Can't really say for sprinting because I've never sprinted in below a 14T and it's unlikely that I ever will.
 

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11's can be useful in TT's because they allow a straight shot to the 14, 13, or 12.
In that case, an 11-23 is very useful.
 
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