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· XXL Clydesdale
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to make my bike less stiff. I've got a 2000 Coppi San Remo (aluminum) with a 105 group and Mavic OpenPros. Would changing the fork for carbon help? Or am I better off just biting the bullet and saving up for a new frame?

Even though the fork and rear triangle are black, I believe they're just painted aluminum...
 

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that ginormous down tube doesn't help at all. you could get yourself a ti stem, carbon forks, and a squishy'er saddle. carbon bars might take a little of the edge off too. sounds to me like you got a stiff aluminum race bike when what you really want is a comfortable steel ride.
 

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bigger tires, less pressure...

It looks like the bike is set up with comfort in mind. If you're not running 25mm tires, that and 10 psi less pressure can do wonders.

Oversize downtubes can make a bike pretty uncomfortable. Aluminum is usually the least comfortable of your material options.

Although many folks swear by the Brooks saddle for comfort, I've found perfection in the Fizik Gobi. It's considered an MTB saddle, but it's been my favorite for the last 3 seasons.

Don't waste your money on a bunch of carbon parts. I'd be surprised if the fork isn't carbon, but I could find any info with a google search.
 

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That's a beautiful frame with a famous racers name on it. I wouldn't give it up.

If you are uncomfortable, what is it, your arms, buns, neck? Comfort is less a product of the frame and more about tires/tire pressure and the contact points between you and the bike: feet, tush, and hands. Are you just feeling jolted around or does something get sore after a significant time in the saddle? Do you feel stretched out or scrunched up or neither? Let us know an maybe we can make suggestions.

Best of luck to you,
Tshirt
 

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I have switched to carbon bars, seat post, and crankset, and then back to aluminum. I can tell no difference from one ride to the next, although I am fairly convinced that my Asian made carbon bars are actually more stiff and less comfortable than my alum. Cinelli bars. Don't waste you money on carbon parts.
As others have said try fatter tires. My first couple of days on 25s last winter I felt like my a$$ end was bouncing all over the place, but after a couple of days I didn't really notice it anymore.
I routinely only fill my tires to 110 psi, and never choose high pressure tires (they are subject to further flatting after being puntured the first time. * the high pressure can push the tube through the hole in the tire.)
If you end up looking for a new frame, don't give up on aluminum. It's the tubeset and the geometry that counts.
As someone mentioned that aero downtube, is very suspect. It the harsh maker. Also I'd think the tight rear wheel spacing has some impact. Pun intended. I've had harsh aluminum frames (Cannondale Cad 5 and Fuji Pro) and comfortable aluminum frames (Schwinn fastback, Motobecane Le Champion and Merckx SC.)
 

· XXL Clydesdale
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43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess I'm comparing it to my old Raleigh 800, which was butted aluminum. That frame soaked up the bumps nicely, but shifted when I cranked on it, which was why I got rid of it.

vdubbusrider, I believe you're right: I should have went with steel or another material. At the time I bought it I didn't know any better.

I'm running 23mm tires at 110psi, so I'm sure that's part of the problem. It sounds like my best bet will be to get 25s. Thanks for the info that small carbon parts don't make a huge difference! :)
 

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Not quite

T-shirt said:
Comfort is less a product of the frame and more about tires/tire pressure and the contact points between you and the bike
While tire pressure, saddle, etc. are important, a frame with short chain stays and a steep seat tube angle is going to be much more effective at transmitting bumps straight into your posterior. It's simple mechanics, and hard to fix with just tires. I'm not saying this frame is not fixable, just that you can have frames that are just plain harsh.
 

· XXL Clydesdale
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43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Kerry Irons said:
While tire pressure, saddle, etc. are important, a frame with short chain stays and a steep seat tube angle is going to be much more effective at transmitting bumps straight into your posterior. It's simple mechanics, and hard to fix with just tires. I'm not saying this frame is not fixable, just that you can have frames that are just plain harsh.
I'm tending to agree with this, in part simply because of the massive difference between my current frame and my previous Raleigh (same tire/pressure). I wish I'd found a happy medium!

The saddle is great, and I'm fairly positive the bike is fit correctly to my body/position. It's not uncomfortable to ride on, it's just rough/harsh/stiff-feeling. I'm afraid I'll probably have to save up for another frame, but I have a soft spot for this one and will probably keep it around! Besides, by the time I can afford a new bike, this one will be worn out! :-(
 
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