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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've had a Bianchi Giro (aluminum) for nearly three years now, and I think I'm seeing the beginings of some serious cracks. It's all occuring at the front of the bike on the top, head, and down tube.At first I thought they were just scratches on the paint but that's probably too unlikely. I'd take pictures but my mom took the camera with her to mexico. Is there anything I can do to stop this, and is it still safe at this point to ride it? Three years (and not very vigorous riding as compared to many other riders) seems a little too early for a frame like that to be going out. Thanks for your help.
 

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I'd say you're SOL...

...but have somebody from a shop check it out, preferably the shop where you bought it, preferably if they'll honor a warranty, if any. This sounds suspiciously like a bike that's had an encounter with a garage wall while attached to the top of a car, but what do I know?
 

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Don't ride it any more! Sounds odd to me. . . if you picked it up from a shop, pay them a visit with the bike; let them check it.
 

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Arrogant roadie.....
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I remember testing one of those Bianchi Giros (60cm) about 3 years ago. To me, the frame felt so weak, I figured it would start cracking in 2-3 years. Guess I was right.....
 

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You might survive a crash if your chainstay broke while out riding, but if your head tube pops off, you're going down hard. It might happen, it might not, but if you're at all worried, then don't ride.
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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Plenty of folks in my club been on Giros 4, 5, 6 years with no effects so I'm not sure I'd immediately trash the model, but anyhoo you should immediately stop riding your frame. Thin walled aluminum with existing cracks, no matter how small, is a recipe for catastrophe.
 

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:idea: You could learn to wels aluminum.........
 

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Visitor302 said:
:idea: You could learn to wels aluminum.........
Not with fatigue cracks like he's got. Aluminum (FYI) does this wonderful thing called fatigue cracking. As vibrations travel through the metal the grain structure of the Al starts to weaken and eventually cracks. Welding it is not only hard, but will not fix your problem, the microstructure of your bike is weakened. Read up on mettalurgy, get a bunch of info on Aluminum fatigue properties, and go talk to a local Bianchi rep about what they're going to do to fix their problem.

Aluminum won't fatigue if it's designed and built properly.
 

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If you are the original owner of the Giro, the warranty should cover it and Bianchi should provide you a new frame -- assuming you haven't crashed it or run into a garage door. I agree with the others about not riding the bike anymore. Too dangerous and not worth the potential injuries from a crash.
 

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tarwheel2 said:
If you are the original owner of the Giro, the warranty should cover it and Bianchi should provide you a new frame -- assuming you haven't crashed it or run into a garage door. I agree with the others about not riding the bike anymore. Too dangerous and not worth the potential injuries from a crash.
Yep! Unfortunately, it's probably toast.
 

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Well,,, I kinda made that post in jest, hence the silly icon...
 

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OIC, I missed the icon. Learning to Weld Al is quite useful though.
 

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An engineer begs to differ:

tubafreak said:
Not with fatigue cracks like he's got. Aluminum (FYI) does this wonderful thing called fatigue cracking. As vibrations travel through the metal the grain structure of the Al starts to weaken and eventually cracks. Welding it is not only hard, but will not fix your problem, the microstructure of your bike is weakened. Read up on mettalurgy, get a bunch of info on Aluminum fatigue properties, and go talk to a local Bianchi rep about what they're going to do to fix their problem.

Aluminum won't fatigue if it's designed and built properly.
Actually, every aluminum frame will eventually fatigue and crack. It's a property of aluminum that you can't escape. All aluminum has a finite life, unlike steel or titanium. Every M.E. student learns that in their sophomore material class.

If you had said "Steel or titanium won't fatigue if it's properly designed and built (and cared for, I might add)", you would've been correct
 

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Dave_Stohler said:
Actually, every aluminum frame will eventually fatigue and crack. It's a property of aluminum that you can't escape. All aluminum has a finite life, unlike steel or titanium. Every M.E. student learns that in their sophomore material class.

If you had said "Steel or titanium won't fatigue if it's properly designed and built (and cared for, I might add)", you would've been correct
I'll give you that, a bit of a slip-up on my part, I don't take that class until winter quarter this coming year (handy that I'm an M.E. isn't it). As for the finite life, with proper design and construction, that finite life can be extended quite far so as to last quite a bit longer than one would ever need a bike to last and knowing how often we all buy new stuff, it's not really an issue for most people.

To the OP: You're frame's shot, get a new one, preferably for free from Bianchi.
 

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tubafreak said:
OIC, I missed the icon. Learning to Weld Al is quite useful though.
Only if you can get a job, where you are paid to do it, and they furnish the equipment. When you have to buy the equipment, in order to use your new skill, it can get a bit dear. Then you need to go out and find work that someone will actually pay you for, so you can get back your investment. I marvel at the beauty of an AL bead done by a truly skilled artisan of the welding craft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Took it to the shop and it turns out I'm still under warranty, so pretty soon I'll be getting an entirely new frame. Turned out a lot better than I thought it would.
 

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Arrogant roadie.....
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tubafreak said:
.........(handy that I'm an M.E. isn't it).................
No, you aren't. I have a degree and a license from the State of New York. All you have is a student ID card. You haven't even learned about endurance limits yet. You are most certainly not an M.E., so don't pass yourself off as one.

What you are is a sophomore, which, in latin means "learned idiot".
 

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tubafreak said:
OIC, I missed the icon. Learning to Weld Al is quite useful though.
Anybody can learn to weld alum. But thin-walled tubing? I think most people would
melt away the tube with an electric arc set-up if not done properly. Plus, for the price
of the right equipment, it would cost at least 2 - 5K. One could spend that on another bike.
 
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