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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I know I'm new here and since my first post is about something unfortunate regarding a Trek bike I just want to say that I'm putting this out here as information, not simply to smear a company or raise a fuss.

I bought a Trek Domane 2.0 in January 2014 at Bike Beat here in Williamsburg, VA. My total cost out the door was about $1600. I know that's pretty low for some dedicated bikers, but I'm well past the age for racing, so it seemed like a serious investment to me. I got it to take advantage of the great new Capital Trail that links Williamsburg with Richmond. The trail is really a wonderful addition to our community. If one is so inclined you could ride a hundred miles on this trail round trip and never have to deal with traffic along the way.

From the time I got my Domane to now I put about 9800 miles on it. This was almost exclusively on the Cap Trail. The bike was great for this kind of riding -- comfortable, durable, responsive. I never had a single issue with any of the components. My one complaint is that it's not the fastest horse in the stable; I average between 15-18 mph on it. Guys with racing bikes would blow past me doing +23mph. (Even very fat guys. Grr.)

This past Sunday I was getting ready for a ride when, to my dismay, I noticed a crack in the seat post about 2 inches below the locking ring. It was not a superficial crack, either. It is through-and-through and goes about 3/4 of the way around the post's circumference. It must have happened very recently, because two weeks earlier I had given the bike a thorough cleaning and did not notice it at that time. It''s clearly not rideable in this condition. I am relieved that I noticed it when I did. If the seat post had snapped while I was riding who knows what might have happened? A serious fall at the least. And then a long walk back to the car.

So, I took the bike into Bike Beat and showed it to them. They were very sympathetic when they saw the crack. Everybody came out to have a look -- a few whistles and eye rolls and head shakes. They looked up my purchase info., took photos, verified my contact information. They said they would send the case along to Trek and see what they would do about it. I was informed that Trek has a lifetime warranty on their frames, but they couldn't say which route Trek would take -- replace the frame or give me a credit towards a new bike. We shall see.

Has anyone else had anything like this happen to them? If so, what was the outcome?
 

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from what I know.. you will be offered a new comparable frame(if they don't have the same model), but you will have to pay for your parts to be transferred to the new frame.
 

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The 2014 Domane 2.0 has a seatPOST, not a mast. Since Robert describes the crack as "2 inches below the locking ring" I presume he means the frame is cracked about 2" below the seat clamp, therefore the possible frame warranty.

Here's one possible scenario: We don't know if the frame is sized properly. It's possible there was insufficient seatpost insertion and the leverage cracked the seat tube.

It's an aluminum frame. Considering how the Iso-Speed decoupler allows the seattube to flex, I'm wondering whether the decoupler is not a smart application to an aluminum frame. Aluminum doesn't fare well with repeated flexing, or any flexing for that matter.

If it were me, I'd try to get a non-Domane aluminum frame or pay an upcharge to get a carbon Domane. I like the decoupler idea, just not in aluminum. I sort of expected this to happen if the tech trickled downward.

spdntrxi is right about the warranty; they may also charge for incidentals like replacement cables and handlebar tape.

I hope Robert will tell us what the final outcome is.
 

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The 2014 Domane 2.0 has a seatPOST, not a mast. Since Robert describes the crack as "2 inches below the locking ring" I presume he means the frame is cracked about 2" below the seat clamp, therefore the possible frame warranty.

Here's one possible scenario: We don't know if the frame is sized properly. It's possible there was insufficient seatpost insertion and the leverage cracked the seat tube.

It's an aluminum frame. Considering how the Iso-Speed decoupler allows the seattube to flex, I'm wondering whether the decoupler is not a smart application to an aluminum frame. Aluminum doesn't fare well with repeated flexing, or any flexing for that matter.

If it were me, I'd try to get a non-Domane aluminum frame or pay an upcharge to get a carbon Domane. I like the decoupler idea, just not in aluminum. I sort of expected this to happen if the tech trickled downward.

spdntrxi is right about the warranty; they may also charge for incidentals like replacement cables and handlebar tape.

I hope Robert will tell us what the final outcome is.
The decoupler idea just sorta scares me in general. It seems like you are just creating a weak point in the frame. But I'm no bike engineer so... I hope he will let us know how the warranty thing works out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cracked about 2" below the seat clamp

The 2014 Domane 2.0 has a seatPOST, not a mast. Since Robert describes the crack as "2 inches below the locking ring" I presume he means the frame is cracked about 2" below the seat clamp, therefore the possible frame warranty.

Here's one possible scenario: We don't know if the frame is sized properly. It's possible there was insufficient seatpost insertion and the leverage cracked the seat tube.

It's an aluminum frame. Considering how the Iso-Speed decoupler allows the seattube to flex, I'm wondering whether the decoupler is not a smart application to an aluminum frame. Aluminum doesn't fare well with repeated flexing, or any flexing for that matter.

If it were me, I'd try to get a non-Domane aluminum frame or pay an upcharge to get a carbon Domane. I like the decoupler idea, just not in aluminum. I sort of expected this to happen if the tech trickled downward.

spdntrxi is right about the warranty; they may also charge for incidentals like replacement cables and handlebar tape.

I hope Robert will tell us what the final outcome is.
My error in terminology. The crack is below the seat clamp in the frame tube itself.

As for sizing. I suspect you mean sized to my dimensions? The shop sized the frame to me before I bought it. Or are you talking about another kind of sizing?

Your theory about the decoupler may be correct. Considering the location of the crack it would seem that the aluminum was being put under stresses that it could not handle.

Since I dropped the bike off at the shop on Thursday and it is now the weekend I don't expect to hear anything until next week. Just to make sure that I was in the loop I did contact Trek myself through their website. I gave them the serial number and the particulars of the crack, etc. But, it's Saturday so nothing will happen for a few days.

I do miss the bike. I have a very good Gary Fisher mountain bike, but it's just not as much fun to ride. And it's not really designed for long distance riding.
 

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I'm sure Trek will do the right thing in getting this repaired. Unfortunately, warranty replacements do take considerable time so you'll probably be waiting a few weeks.

I have a Domane and I love it, but mine is carbon. I'm surprised that Trek came-out with aluminum Domanes as aluminum "fatigues" over time and eventually fails. Heck, my father's old aluminum GT road bike cracked in the seat tube as well and he hardly abused it and it had no "iso decoupler". My understanding of carbon is that it can be designed to flex in some directions and be firm in others, where as you can't do that with aluminum.

Let us know how it turns out!
 

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I'm sure Trek will do the right thing in getting this repaired. Unfortunately, warranty replacements do take considerable time so you'll probably be waiting a few weeks.
I would be surprised if it takes more than a couple days. I had a stress crack in the paint on the frame of a Domane 5.2 which I showed to the dealer on a Saturday and Trek sent a replacement frame that arrived at the dealer the following Wednesday. I had to pay to have the parts moved to the new frame because I didn't buy the bike from that dealer (I moved here from a different state) but was told if I had purchased from them the parts move would have been free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Trek Came Through

Trek took no time in getting back to me. Their offer is pretty much what I had been told to expect. There are two options: they would replace the frame (labor on me) or they'd give me a $900 credit towards a new bike. My eyes lit up at that last option. I'd been fantasizing about getting a new bike anyway, so almost a grand towards a new one seemed like just the carrot to get me going in that direction. So, I talked to the helpful young woman who had been taking care of my case at the shop and decided to go for a big upgrade -- Domane SL 6, 2017. My size had to be ordered from Trek, so I won't have it until the end of the week at the earliest. I hope its here by the weekend. I can't wait to give it its maiden ride.
 

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My one complaint is that it's not the fastest horse in the stable; I average between 15-18 mph on it. Guys with racing bikes would blow past me doing +23mph. (Even very fat guys. Grr.)
Glad Trek is taking care of this for you. Just be aware that no matter what bike you get your speed is pretty much all about you.
 

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Glad Trek is taking care of this for you. Just be aware that no matter what bike you get your speed is pretty much all about you.
Ditto. Marketing hype would lead you to believe that a new bike will get you from 15 mph average to 23 mph+, but the reality is that it's all about training and seat-time, not the bike. However, new bikes and new bike parts make us feel faster and happier, so... :D
 
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