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Hi All,

Looking to purchase my first gravel bike. Mostly it will be used on the road (sometimes gravel)
They have a different crankset option and I'm looking for either 48/32 - 11-34 or 46/30 -11-34. The question is what is the difference? Which one will be better for the road? The bike with 48/32 i suppose should be faster, but will i notice the difference in speed on the road?
I'm new to all this aspects
Cheers
 

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Huge in Japan
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No single answer.

I recently picked up a bike with 48/32 having been 50/34 for quite a few years. The fact that I am not getting any younger, the terrain that I myself ride and the evolution in range of cassettes made this a wonderful move for me. I feel like could go 48/32 on all of my doubles. This doesn't mean that you or anyone else will feel that way though. What drive train setup are you most accustomed to and what do you want to be different about it?
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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What is 'gravel' where you live. What kind of surface? Packed dirt? Chipped limestone? Fire roads? Pea gravel? How steep a gradient, and what kind of a seated hillclimber are you? Do you do any touring?

Either are great for offroading, 46/30 is as low as doubles on roadie BBs get. Shimano has a 48/31 that is a compromise gearing that I personally like--you get the high gear for paved road cruising and bombing downhills while getting almost the same low-end gearing.
 

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Depends on your terrain mostly. Flatter/rolling, go with the higher gearing, longer sustained climbs, go with lower.
 

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How strong of a cyclist are you? How flat or rolling or mountainous of a terrain are you riding? Compare the gearing that you're riding now with what you're shopping for and see which fits you better. You can use this calculator to compare what you are riding now to what you are shopping for.

 

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I'd get the bike you can change the chainrings, then you can have it both ways. ... always better!
 

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What is 'gravel' where you live. What kind of surface? Packed dirt? Chipped limestone? Fire roads? Pea gravel? How steep a gradient, and what kind of a seated hillclimber are you? Do you do any touring?

Either are great for offroading, 46/30 is as low as doubles on roadie BBs get. Shimano has a 48/31 that is a compromise gearing that I personally like--you get the high gear for paved road cruising and bombing downhills while getting almost the same low-end gearing.
Actually, if one wants to spend the money, a Rene Herse crankset can be had as low as 42/26. It calls for a 110mm BB.

 

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I'm a big fan of 46/30, works for me riding mostly road with lots of climbing, and some very steep gravel.
For road, I use a 700c wheelset, 11/30 cassette, for gravel 650b, 11/34 cassette.
Crank I settled on is Rotor Aldhu.. has most any combo of chainrings, and works with either 24 or 30mm BB setups depending on which axle you purchase.
 

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FWIW, I rode my 46/30 setup on the road on Sunday. We were pacelining at 20 mph and I was definitely not in the 11. Must have been the 15 or 17.
 

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Hi All,

Looking to purchase my first gravel bike. Mostly it will be used on the road (sometimes gravel)
They have a different crankset option and I'm looking for either 48/32 - 11-34 or 46/30 -11-34. The question is what is the difference?
Gear ratio.

If you plan to spend more than 50% riding on the road, go with the larger chainrings.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Unless you plan on racing, I would go with the lower gearing. You will especially appreciate the 30 ring if you have any long steep hills to climb.
 

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Are you in need of maintaining a steady 30 mph on the road ? A 46/11 combo is capable of that. I find 46/30 to be a really useful combo.
 

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Are you in need of maintaining a steady 30 mph on the road ? A 46/11 combo is capable of that. I find 46/30 to be a really useful combo.
Really? steady 30mph? Please post a ride where you rode at 30mph for 30 minutes. Who are you Peter Sagan?
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Really? steady 30mph? Please post a ride where you rode at 30mph for 30 minutes. Who are you Peter Sagan?
I rode 25mph for 10 miles straight once. We had a strong tailwind on a shore ride. Seriously, it was unreal.
 

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Really? steady 30mph? Please post a ride where you rode at 30mph for 30 minutes. Who are you Peter Sagan?
I think that was the point of the post. People worry about whether their top gear is big enough but there are hardly any of us who can actually spin out such a gear unless going downhill, and at those speeds a tight tuck is just as fast or faster than pedaling. The fastest time trial I ever rode was on a bike with a top gear of 45/13. That's 27 mph at 100 rpm. Faster than I can sustain without a massive tail wind.
 

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Top End: Everyone talks about spinning out the gear. I disagree. When I have a strong tailwind or a long roll'out from a mountain, I don't want to be spinning out for an hour. I want a tall top gear, that I can spin for an hour @ 30-35mph to keep the speed up. I'm not spinning out, maybe 60-85rpms.
Bottom End: I'm suspecting this is where he's going to have a problem. No one knows what his fitness is or his ability, he sayes he's new. No one knows where he rides, he's new he may not know either. I would get the lowest gear he can.
He can always put on bigger chainrings when he knows for sure.
 

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Top End: Everyone talks about spinning out the gear. I disagree. When I have a strong tailwind or a long roll'out from a mountain, I don't want to be spinning out for an hour. I want a tall top gear, that I can spin for an hour @ 30-35mph to keep the speed up. I'm not spinning out, maybe 60-85rpms.
Bottom End: I'm suspecting this is where he's going to have a problem. No one knows what his fitness is or his ability, he sayes he's new. No one knows where he rides, he's new he may not know either. I would get the lowest gear he can.
He can always put on bigger chainrings when he knows for sure.
I disagree. We know where the OP is riding: "Mostly it will be used on the road (sometimes gravel) ". Because of this I believe the larger chainring (still low for road use) will likely serve him and newbies alike better.
 

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Top End: Everyone talks about spinning out the gear. I disagree. When I have a strong tailwind or a long roll'out from a mountain, I don't want to be spinning out for an hour. I want a tall top gear, that I can spin for an hour @ 30-35mph to keep the speed up. I'm not spinning out, maybe 60-85rpms.
Bottom End: I'm suspecting this is where he's going to have a problem. No one knows what his fitness is or his ability, he sayes he's new. No one knows where he rides, he's new he may not know either. I would get the lowest gear he can.
He can always put on bigger chainrings when he knows for sure.
An hour @ 30-35mph, who are you, Peter Sagan?
 
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