Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did my first crit today, twilight series in Santa Rosa, and I did not come in last and did not cause a crash which were my two main goals. Question is about training, should I do 2 minute all out efforts as this was aprox lap time or should I go longer? I have no clue. Laps were .9 miles with average speeds around 24/25. I think I can do a bit better as I was hesitant in the corners and that will get better. Riding a Roubaix whic is a bit slow in the corners but thats all I have unless I steal my wife's Madone 4.5 which is quicker. At any rate training advice please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Did my first crit today, twilight series in Santa Rosa, and I did not come in last and did not cause a crash which were my two main goals. Question is about training, should I do 2 minute all out efforts as this was aprox lap time or should I go longer? I have no clue. Laps were .9 miles with average speeds around 24/25. I think I can do a bit better as I was hesitant in the corners and that will get better. Riding a Roubaix whic is a bit slow in the corners but thats all I have unless I steal my wife's Madone 4.5 which is quicker. At any rate training advice please.
In addition to a solid base you need to work on 2 minute and 5 minute intervals. The base will let you stay with the group on those long high speed segments, the 2 minute intervals will help you get back on or close a small gap, and the 5 minute intervals will help you close larger gaps or chase a break. You will gain huge benefits from learning how to corner well and keep a good position in the pack. Your goal should be to avoid having to accelerate unless absolutely necessary, and poor cornering skills will mean constant accelerations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I hear what your saying about the cornering. I got yelled at a few times for getting "off my line" and then I just sat in the back as I did not want to cause a crash. Is having the proper line like car racing, where as if someone cuts under you in a corner and essentially steals your line it their bad? I'm not sure of rules like that, if there are any. I think my base is ok it was the constant accelerations to catch up out of the corners that was killing me. Intervals start tomorrow.
 

·
Dr. Flats a lot
Joined
·
740 Posts
There are two things I found key to succeed in crits. The first is to stay out of the wind and save your energy but still cover the front and be ready to close a gap. The further in front you are the more energy you burn, the farther back the less you can cover a break and the more energy you waste braking in corners and dealing with the yo-yo effect.
The second is to figure out which kind of sprinter you are. There is the short fast accelerator, Cavendish being the classic example. You wait till the last second and accelerate through and grab it at the line. The second is the long sprinter. You go early and build a big gap. On a 1 mile course, you'd go with 2 laps or more to go. And the last is between these 2, you'd attack soon after the last lap started, accelerate hard, build a gap, use your faster cornering and leave enough to accelerate and hold off the final sprint.
Staying on your line is what keeps everyone safe. You need to be going through the turn with the same trajectory as everyone else. When you brake in a corner the bike stops turning and goes straight, and if there are 10-20 of you going through it can be calamity. This is as dangerous as it gets and people take it very personally and seriously. The inside line is shorter and quicker but it's more crowded, the outside is slower but usually not as packed. The lamo move is to start on the outside and then dive the corner. DO NOT DO THIS. Bike crashes are nasty, nasty business. We all have jobs and families to go home to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice. I am planning on building slowly and will probably stay back until I feel a bit for comfortable in the corners. The course has some S bends etc and that's where I got yelled at for not holding my line. I was as bad as starting wide and diving in but did not see someone coming up inside of me on the second half of the S, I thought I had the inside line. Once I get that down I will start to ride in the pack more. I most certainly do not want to cause a crash, I am aware of the ramifications of crashing in a pack. I must say that it is fun. I have no dreams of moving up to CAT1 or anything. I'm 48 and am happy that I could keep up in the CAT4/5. Racers are a bit cold to new people I must say.
 

·
Dr. Flats a lot
Joined
·
740 Posts
It takes awhile to get used to it. Not a bad idea to sit back and figure it out. You on a club? Getting out on group rides will help a lot with getting comfortable, also may have a couple more friendly faces. Bike racers can be in love with the smell of their own poop. It is a hoot though and it's a fantastic way of keeping you fit and good lookin.
 

·
Masters Neophyte
Joined
·
2,209 Posts
.. You on a club? Getting out on group rides will help a lot with getting comfortable, also may have a couple more friendly faces. Bike racers can be in love with the smell of their own poop...
This is great advice. It's true that racers -well, roadies at least- can be pretty "cold" to newcomers. But being on a race team gives you an immediate "in". Even if none of your teammates are in that particular category, it's still a badge saying "I belong".
At least, that's been my experience, YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys. I will investigate clubs in the area that race. I really have not done large group rides other than Levi's Fondo and a few century's, which don't really count. Thanks again.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top