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justinb said:
Anyone else notice that he doesn't pull the back leg through, and has the little skip on the first step? Not that I'm criticizing, just that I feel my own dismount has been validated.
IMO right leg through is only useful for the highest speed dismounts, i.e. a pair of barriers on a smooth flat. A lot of pros never do right leg through.
 

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henry_j said:
Yes there was a steep downhill on the other side. You do notice the details.
I realize that it's 99% up to conditioning and fitness, but I have this weird thing about trying to notice all the details, try to get inside their heads, maybe there's something I can use. Same is true with road cycling, i.e. are they climbing on the tops, hoods, drops, in or out of saddle, when do they shift, etc etc. OCD?
 

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justinb said:
Anyone else notice that he doesn't pull the back leg through, and has the little skip on the first step? Not that I'm criticizing, just that I feel my own dismount has been validated.
I've had to justify my refusal to put my leg "through" for years. Thankfully, with everyone having fast internet connections now, it's easy to say "shut up and go watch how the pro's race". :p I blame Simon Burney for the "leg through" phenomenon, since for years his was the only book on cyclocross you could get in the US. Wake up guys, just because it's in a book doesn't make it better.

My reasoning is simple: The longer I pedal and the later I brake and get off the bike, the faster I'm going to get through the running section. At every single race, I sit and watch guys in other categories start getting off their saddle 60 feet from the barrier so they can get everything lined up to "get their leg through", and all that time they're doing nothing to keep their speed up, especially in mud, snow, or sand. I've tried it, but I know it's faster to jump off "ugly" at the last second and only take one or two steps before crossing the first barrier. Ask any experienced criterium, mountainbike, or even motorsports racer how to get through a "slow" spot in the course, and they will tell you to keep the power on and brake as late as possible. Getting off the power early so you have time to earn style points on your frilly technique is dumb, but hey, if they want to make it easy for me to pass them over the barriers, I'm not going to complain. :thumbsup:
 

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-Anomie- said:
I've had to justify my refusal to put my leg "through" for years. Thankfully, with everyone having fast internet connections now, it's easy to say "shut up and go watch how the pro's race". :p I blame Simon Burney for the "leg through" phenomenon, since for years his was the only book on cyclocross you could get in the US. Wake up guys, just because it's in a book doesn't make it better.

My reasoning is simple: The longer I pedal and the later I brake and get off the bike, the faster I'm going to get through the running section. At every single race, I sit and watch guys in other categories start getting off their saddle 60 feet from the barrier so they can get everything lined up to "get their leg through", and all that time they're doing nothing to keep their speed up, especially in mud, snow, or sand. I've tried it, but I know it's faster to jump off "ugly" at the last second and only take one or two steps before crossing the first barrier. Ask any experienced criterium, mountainbike, or even motorsports racer how to get through a "slow" spot in the course, and they will tell you to keep the power on and brake as late as possible. Getting off the power early so you have time to earn style points on your frilly technique is dumb, but hey, if they want to make it easy for me to pass them over the barriers, I'm not going to complain. :thumbsup:

+1. My usual response is... "beat you over the barriers, didn't I?" Now if I could only get the bike riding part down...
 

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-Anomie- said:
I've had to justify my refusal to put my leg "through" for years. Thankfully, with everyone having fast internet connections now, it's easy to say "shut up and go watch how the pro's race". :p I blame Simon Burney for the "leg through" phenomenon, since for years his was the only book on cyclocross you could get in the US. Wake up guys, just because it's in a book doesn't make it better.

My reasoning is simple: The longer I pedal and the later I brake and get off the bike, the faster I'm going to get through the running section. At every single race, I sit and watch guys in other categories start getting off their saddle 60 feet from the barrier so they can get everything lined up to "get their leg through", and all that time they're doing nothing to keep their speed up, especially in mud, snow, or sand. I've tried it, but I know it's faster to jump off "ugly" at the last second and only take one or two steps before crossing the first barrier. Ask any experienced criterium, mountainbike, or even motorsports racer how to get through a "slow" spot in the course, and they will tell you to keep the power on and brake as late as possible. Getting off the power early so you have time to earn style points on your frilly technique is dumb, but hey, if they want to make it easy for me to pass them over the barriers, I'm not going to complain. :thumbsup:
Leg through is faster at higher speeds because you can hit the ground in stride. I'm sure Pontoni and most other pros use a mix of the two depending on the circumstances. As you point out snow, mud and sand tip the balance in favor of stepping behind (or uphill barriers like in the video). If you only dismount by stepping behind, it will be slower some of the time. Might be worth practicing both ways.
 

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henry_j said:
Yes! He was doing the same on a difficult approach to a steep uphill barrier the week before. He grabbed the downtube even before he swung his leg over the saddle:

https://www.cyclocrossvideos.com/cx/misc/1999_dismount_slow_motion.html

See the details in still frames here:

https://www.cyclocrossvideos.com/cx/misc/Pontoni_dismount.html
https://www.cyclocrossvideos.com/cx/misc/Pontoni_detail_frame_12.jpg
What do you think of the last guy up pushing his pedals back into position before remounting? Worth the effort?
 

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tmer52 said:
What do you think of the last guy up pushing his pedals back into position before remounting? Worth the effort?
Nah, if your technique is good your legs are going to already be moving by the time you get your feet back on the pedals. It should all happen so fast that you don't even notice where the pedals are. That said, before you get off for a run that requires you to shoulder the bike, it sometimes helps to position the cranks so the non-drive side pedal isn't gouging you in the kidney :p .
 
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