Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone else tried this? I've done three races this way now and I feel it's all disadvantage. less traction, I don't feel they're any faster, and (at least the tires I have) tough to get set up tubeless. Am I missing an advantage somewhere?
I guess I didn't think about it too much beforehand, just assumed it would be the better way to go.
I think I'm going back to MTB tires for next weekend.

Anyone have any opinions to dissuade me? Experiences? Thanks.
 

·
CX'er
Joined
·
863 Posts
Besides deep mud or thick grass where it seems like the narrower wheels cut through better I don't think CX tires offer much of an advantage. In my area, there's not enough pavement to really lose much with mtb tires either. Sticky muddy races is where I've really hated the wider tires since they seem to carry a lot more mud which means carrying a heavier bike when that's needed. So maybe 1 or 2 races a season I see a disadvantage. I have not used full on mud mtb tires for CX racing however and that might make a difference but most mtb trails around me are either sand or hard pack so there's not usually sticky, greasy mud in wet mtb races even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Let's put it this way. The UCI specifies a tire width maximum, not a minimum, and pretty much every pro runs right at that maximum on every course.

Wider tires aren't a disadvantage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Let's put it this way. The UCI specifies a tire width maximum, not a minimum, and pretty much every pro runs right at that maximum on every course.

Wider tires aren't a disadvantage.
I've ran an 1.8 Renegade on the front of my TCX for a couple of CX races with different course characteristics. On a bumpy, mainly dirt with sparse grass course it was indeed faster and I beat several guys that normally beat me. Then on a course with thick grass it was slower from having to push the wider tire through the grass. On a course with thick grass you'd be better off with a thinner tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Courses around here do feature some thicker grass, but we almost never see any mud. I just didn't even think about it, assumed Cross tires would be the way to go. I have my MTB tires remounted now. We'll see how it goes this weekend. Dry and 75 on Friday, I'm thinking it will just be the smarter way to go. I'm thinking a little more air if I preride and it feels sluggish in the grass, but we'll see. It's a Friday afternoon race and I took the whole day off so I should have plenty of time to play around with pressures etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I've tried it and CX tires were definitely faster for me. I've done a lot of CX racing on a CX bike, so I am used to the narrower tires, but this year I did a few CX races on my SS MTB. I started with some 1.8" Renegades and they were definitely slower rolling on grass and those particular tires had terrible cornering traction on gravel. I'm now running a 40mm Nano up front and a 35mm Cross Boss in the back. I love that combo for grass, gravel, and other dry conditions...I'm getting more traction and less rolling resistance. If/when it ever gets wet this season, I'll pull out the 33mm PDXs.

mrcookie - What cross tires were you using?
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
14,452 Posts
I'm now running a 40mm Nano up front and a 35mm Cross Boss in the back. I love that combo for grass, gravel, and other dry conditions...I'm getting more traction and less rolling resistance.
Interesting. Any reason why you run a skinnier tire in back? I would think you would want to do just the opposite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Interesting. Any reason why you run a skinnier tire in back? I would think you would want to do just the opposite.
The wider tire up front provides some additional cornering traction and smooths out the bumps a little bit. The front tire doesn't contribute as much rolling resistance as the rear, so there isn't as much penalty as there would be in the back. And having proportionally less corning traction in the rear can be an advantage, as it's much easier to recover from sliding out the back tire than it is the front. And in some tight fast corners, brake sliding the rear can be the fastest way around.
 

·
CX'er
Joined
·
863 Posts
Interesting. Any reason why you run a skinnier tire in back? I would think you would want to do just the opposite.
It's a very common practice for Mtb'ers for the reasons Smith stated.

My personal experience is that this applies more to a lot vertical terrain (typical of mtb trails) where there's a lot more grip needed on the front because of descending and a ton of weight on the front tire. For CX, that's not as much the case and cornering technique is a little different. Cornering technique for mtb often involves teachers telling you to keep the front weight, Sven Nys suggests the opposite in his recent GCN video about CX at around 4:10.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJ_yHeNzvrk
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top