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Hello, I ride a lot during the week, but continue to see that people that do other workouts like running and swimming, continue to become stronger. Since I don't like any of the 2 other sports just mentioned, thought about getting a rower as my cross training exercise. Any thoughts about it? And any rower you recommend?
 

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I live near the Gulf of Mexico so I started kayaking a few years back. Great compliment to cycling. Be aware though that it has the distinct chance of becoming like cycling in constant upgrading to find better, lighter, more efficient boats. On the plus side, water is a lot softer than asphalt in the event of an accident.
 

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I row in the cold months of winter here in SoCal. Hands down Concept 2 is the way to go for a rower. I’ve got the Concept 2 pm5.
It is a phenomenal workout. I still cycle through the winter just not as much as I usually do. It does not hinder my cycling performance at all. In some aspects it really helps my cycling. It’s great for your core and gaining power in your legs.
As with all exercising you want to make sure you have proper form. Rowing is not natural and it takes some work to get it correct. Concept 2 has a great forum and when I got started I uploaded videos of myself rowing to get critique on my form. Helped tremendously.
 

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I took up rowing several years ago. I'm fortunate in that I live just a few miles from two nice reservoirs. Before I retired, it was nice to get up early and get a row in before work. It's a great full-body workout, but surprisingly works more of the legs than the arms.
 

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I do crossfit stuff like jumping for bone and overall body development, light running, and some routine back exercises because as we age we the back is first to go if it's not worked out. Rowing is a non-impact exercise, it's a good cardio workout but doesn't do much for bone developmemnt.
 

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I've been curious about rowing since I stopped running, and then, when that one olympic rower won the zwift championship last year, it really piqued my interest. It seems to be a good full-body workout (almost 84% muscle utilization?) so I picked up a concept 2 but I'm still rehabbing a back injury so it only has light use right now, looking forward to more regular use.
 

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I'm "meh" on rowing as a cross-train for cycling.

Here's why:

It's almost the same crouched over position, using most of the same muscles... so it's not really very different. You're sitting on your ass, which we all do too much of already, you're crunched up, again we already have too much of that, it's not really a strength challenge, and the aerobic challenge, well that's what the bike is for.

Instead I prefer something more weight-bearing. Something that uses the muscles in a different position (such as standing or on the floor), something that challenges strength such as weight lifting, something that builds bone density such as running or jumping.

So when I cross train, I do a lot of different things. Some light jogging, some standing and floor-based calisthenics, some agility drills (such as football or soccer stuff), some weightliting (big lifts, not the cosmetic nautilus machine crap).

Oh and lots of core and flexibility work.

My 2 cents.
 

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I'm "meh" on rowing as a cross-train for cycling.

Here's why:

It's almost the same crouched over position, using most of the same muscles... so it's not really very different. You're sitting on your ass, which we all do too much of already, you're crunched up, again we already have too much of that, it's not really a strength challenge, and the aerobic challenge, well that's what the bike is for.

Instead I prefer something more weight-bearing. Something that uses the muscles in a different position (such as standing or on the floor), something that challenges strength such as weight lifting, something that builds bone density such as running or jumping.

So when I cross train, I do a lot of different things. Some light jogging, some standing and floor-based calisthenics, some agility drills (such as football or soccer stuff), some weightliting (big lifts, not the cosmetic nautilus machine crap).

Oh and lots of core and flexibility work.

My 2 cents.
Well, if you cycle for fitness instead of cycling for cycling efficiency.


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A lot of people consider rowing machines boring as heck (like a bike on a trainer). They are expensive so consider that if you're prone to getting bored by repetitive stuff like that. If you don't like running it's hard to imagine you'd like indoor rowing but who knows.

I tend to agree with #8. To compliment cycling I'd do something totally different like weights and old school calisthenics. I've never done yoga but I hear that's really good too. But if you want to improve cycling with something that's not cycling I hear rowing is really good. Skating is good too. Running isn't in my experience.
 

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A lot of people consider rowing machines boring as heck (like a bike on a trainer). They are expensive so consider that if you're prone to getting bored by repetitive stuff like that. If you don't like running it's hard to imagine you'd like indoor rowing but who knows.

I tend to agree with #8. To compliment cycling I'd do something totally different like weights and old school calisthenics. I've never done yoga but I hear that's really good too. But if you want to improve cycling with something that's not cycling I hear rowing is really good. Skating is good too. Running isn't in my experience.
I agree that rowing machines are boring as heck. To be totally honest, actual rowing on the water isn't all that exciting either. The only time it gets exciting is when you get in trouble (like when an unexpected storm pops up), or if you are racing (which I don't). One of the aspects of rowing I like is that it's serene. I like to get out early in the morning, having the place to myself, the only disturbance to the glass-smooth water is my seeing my wake disappear off the stern, and catching the sunrise.
 

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One of the aspects of rowing I like is that it's serene. I like to get out early in the morning, having the place to myself, the only disturbance to the glass-smooth water is my seeing my wake disappear off the stern, and catching the sunrise.
Hard to beat that although I only know it from canoeing not for exercise per se but to try and catch fish.
 

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I agree that rowing machines are boring as heck. To be totally honest, actual rowing on the water isn't all that exciting either. The only time it gets exciting is when you get in trouble (like when an unexpected storm pops up), or if you are racing (which I don't). One of the aspects of rowing I like is that it's serene. I like to get out early in the morning, having the place to myself, the only disturbance to the glass-smooth water is my seeing my wake disappear off the stern, and catching the sunrise.
Did you row for Princeton?


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