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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I ride on a stationary bike at the gym, I usually do 5 minutes seated and 2 minutes standing (trying to protect the twigs and berries). Will this type of time out of the saddle be OK with the Fluid2 and my bike? In other words, will the extra torque on the bike and trainer from being out of the saddle cause harm to either the bike or trainer????
 

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LyncStar said:
When I ride on a stationary bike at the gym, I usually do 5 minutes seated and 2 minutes standing (trying to protect the twigs and berries). Will this type of time out of the saddle be OK with the Fluid2 and my bike? In other words, will the extra torque on the bike and trainer from being out of the saddle cause harm to either the bike or trainer????
Unless you can stay absolutely upright and not sway back and forth, you will place additional stress on your bike as the rear wheel axle is fixed in place.
 

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pappymd said:
Unless you can stay absolutely upright and not sway back and forth, you will place additional stress on your bike as the rear wheel axle is fixed in place.
Yep. As a clyde, I made damn sure I don't stand up when using the cycleops (fluid 2). I'd hate to bend the stays. I won't use my nicer bikes either. Too much risk.
 

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pappymd said:
Unless you can stay absolutely upright and not sway back and forth, you will place additional stress on your bike as the rear wheel axle is fixed in place.
My wife and I have CycleOps Fluid2 and I noticed last night when she was hammering out of the saddle how much sway there was in the back end of the bike...It was actually kind of disturbing...
 

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i have the same trainer, and really i dont think it's the rear triangle that's flexing, i notice that it's the actual sockets that go into your axels that are pivoting....

it's a poor design....but whatever the case, the bike is meant to sustain such loads anyways! when u ride on the road, that rear triangle area is supporting just as much weight out there as it is on the trainer. and whether u are romping on the road, or romping indoors it's the same amount of stress. just dont let it sway a whole ton! XD
 

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I know two guys who have broken frames by sprinting out of the saddle on trainers. Both bikes were aluminum with carbon rear triangles, and both broke at the right dropout. Both guys are young, strong Cat 2 riders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
bikenerd said:
I know two guys who have broken frames by sprinting out of the saddle on trainers. Both bikes were aluminum with carbon rear triangles, and both broke at the right dropout. Both guys are young, strong Cat 2 riders.
Thanks all. I think the gist is that this type of trainer is not really designed for out of the saddle hammering and for that type of indoor work one is better off with a spin bike.
 

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On the road the rear axle is allowed to sway with the bike, while on a trainer it's held in place while you twist the rest of the bike. Seven, for example, voids their warranty if you ride the Odonata on a trainer.
 

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LyncStar said:
Thanks all. I think the gist is that this type of trainer is not really designed for out of the saddle hammering and for that type of indoor work one is better off with a spin bike.

Can you stand up and ride on rollers and do a sprint?
 

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TurboTurtle said:
Once. - TF
I saw at Performance Bike store they had a bracket to mount your front fork to the rollers trac. I don't know if this was an actual usable piece or (obviously) something to hold the bike
up.

I imagine the stress would then be place on your front fork. I think it would be easier than
on your rear. But what do I know?
 
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