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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Date: 16-17, April 2016. (2 days)
Distance: 170 Km (around 106 miles)
Longest distance per day: 95km (59 miles)
Participants: 2 persons



Route Builder: custom route created on April 23, 2016

We have met this figure just after start of the trip. It was part of the wooden sculpture group near the entrance to the forest road.



As for me it looks like a pre-christian idol or just a depressive mushroom.

The places to visit:


Besides cute spring nature and surprisingly good and empty roads – there are two places to visit in this area: Moryntsi village, where is Taras Shevchenko was born. His poetry was inspired by this place, its quite energy and he have lost his virginity somewhere around in his 13, which is indirectly mentioned in one of his poems.


Open air museum in Moryntsi village.


The fact is that this type of building are super eco-friendly and they were naturally integrated in to landscape. A kind of local Feng Shui.





Traditional Ukrainian home “Khata”.






Due to short trip time – all my bike bags and backpack were half-empty. The custom frame bag was constructed by me and I considered it like 80% successful. There are few improvements needed, such as one one more additional mounting point and smartphone pocket depth :)



Beekeeper home and old hives on the left.




Camp before Korsun-Shevchenkivskyi. We have used light tent (1.2kg) as a part of lightweight bike touring.


Also we have successfully tested dehydrated hiking food manufactured in Ukraine. It keeps national cuisine taste.



Ros River



Ko




A palace of the family of Lopukhinykh-Demydovykh in Korsun-Shevchenkivskyi.







Old, almost abandoned exhibition of old army equipment near palace of the family of Lopukhinykh-Demydovykh. This one is one of the first Soviet jet planes (1955).



Conclusion:


Central Ukraine remains a kind of “terra incognita” for hiking/cycling tourist. I’m not sure if there is some sense to come here just with tourist reason, but is you are already in Ukraine and have some time – there is sense for bike touring.

Note:



  • Use your MTB/hardtail bike instead of road bike. Roads surface can be on horrible level and looks like a moon surface. At the same time – almost all the roads during this trip was normal and has almost no traffic.
  • There is no much English-speaking people in villages, but you can try to talk nerdy young people in cities. Ukraine is country of IT outsource, just lookup for coders around you.
  • You can take your bike to local trains, but there is no place for bike in a buses.
  • It’s quite safety in a village area, during years of hiking/cycling I had no one incident. At the same time – avoid placing your tent inside of city parks.
 

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Thanks for posting a little perspective. Exploring the world on a bicycle is the right speed to see everything and interact with the people. Is cycling popular in Ukraine? Do motorists give thumbs up or feel inconvenienced?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for posting a little perspective. Exploring the world on a bicycle is the right speed to see everything and interact with the people. Is cycling popular in Ukraine? Do motorists give thumbs up or feel inconvenienced?
You right about interacting with people. While getting older I admit that bigger part of my attention devoted to "people watching" during the trip.
Cycling in a cities become more and more popular, it almost like explosive growth. But not touring. There is a gap between 20-30 km cycling for fun on weekend and touring which is 70-120 km per day.

Motorists rather indifferent or pretending they do not see you at all. This is not Turkey where you will be tired to reply on each "Hello!".

People in villages sincerely do not understand this way of traveling/time spending. One village bistro owner asked us "Why don't you take a train instead of cycling so long?" and he never understand my explanation.
 

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This is awesome! A part of the world we are unlikely to see in person, yet so charming and unique.

People in villages sincerely do not understand this way of traveling/time spending. One village bistro owner asked us "Why don't you take a train instead of cycling so long?" and he never understand my explanation.

A lot of people in the countryside can't comprehend using physical effort for leisure, especially if they're doing physical work all day. That's my guess.
 

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You right about interacting with people. While getting older I admit that bigger part of my attention devoted to "people watching" during the trip.
Cycling in a cities become more and more popular, it almost like explosive growth. But not touring. There is a gap between 20-30 km cycling for fun on weekend and touring which is 70-120 km per day.

Motorists rather indifferent or pretending they do not see you at all. This is not Turkey where you will be tired to reply on each "Hello!".

People in villages sincerely do not understand this way of traveling/time spending. One village bistro owner asked us "Why don't you take a train instead of cycling so long?" and he never understand my explanation.
The citizens of many a small town across the US midwest, very similar to Ukraine from what I read, would say the same thing, although they'd be referring to their old pickup trucks as rail transportation has been neglected in favor of high speed "interstates."

I've taken a few multi day bike trips with sleeping bag and tent. Every time, I saw the world I'd never see from the interstates and met people I'd never meet driving a car. The sense of history one gets is rich and complex, in the US entirely missing from the corporate culture of franchised gas stations and fast food restaurants lining the interstates. Touring by bike gets below that blanket of sameness, opening up the senses to the rich cultures off the interstates.

Biking 120 miles over to the Atlantic Ocean from Washington, DC, I discovered the original stage coach route to Annapolis on the Chesapeake Bay, virtually unchanged, largely due to an adjacent interstate highway. A little old lady took me into her 4 unit "motel" for the night. Awoke to the sounds of a farm tractor plowing the field outside my window, smelling the pungent soil, a sensory stimulation I hadn't had for years. I enjoyed fresh strawberry short cake in a French four star restaurant in the middle of nowhere, and traversed river on a ferry still operated over a hundred years, a quaint relic of bygone times. Off the beaten track, one has endless opportunities to experience the details of how people live, after all, the main reason people like to travel. No better way to do that than on a bike. :thumbsup:
 

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dmitry -- Totally wonderful! Thanks for the tour!
 

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Off the beaten track, one has endless opportunities to experience the details of how people live, after all, the main reason people like to travel. No better way to do that than on a bike

Some of my fondest memories are of road-tripping through some small towns, both here and abroad. You summed up perfectly why bike touring is especially appealing. :thumbsup:
 
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