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Estimated total costs from non-fatal and fatal bicycle crashes in the USA: 1997-2013 | Injury Prevention

Abstract

Introduction Emergency department visits and hospital admissions resulting from adult bicycle trauma have increased dramatically. Annual medical costs and work losses of these incidents last were estimated for 2005 and quality-of-life losses for 2000.

Results Approximately 3.8 million non-fatal adult bicycle injuries were reported during the study period and 9839 deaths. In 2010 dollars, estimated adult bicycle injury costs totalled $24.4 billion in 2013. Estimated injury costs per mile bicycled fell from $2.85 in 2001 to $2.35 in 2009. From 1999 to 2013, total estimated costs were $209 billion due to non-fatal bicycle injuries and $28 billion due to fatal injuries. Inflation-free annual costs in the study period increased by 137% for non-fatal injuries and 23% for fatal injuries. The share of non-fatal costs associated with injuries to riders age 45 and older increased by 1.6% (95% CI 1.4% to 1.9%) annually. The proportion of costs due to incidents that occurred on a street or highway steadily increased by 0.8% (95% CI 0.4% to 1.3%) annually.

Conclusions Inflation-free costs per case associated with non-fatal bicycle injuries are increasing. The growth in costs is especially associated with rising ridership, riders 45 and older, and street/highway crashes
In addition to creating two data points myself, I buy long-term disability insurance through work, which is also expensive.
 

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"The growth in costs is especially associated with rising ridership, riders 45 and older, and street/highway crashes" and Strava segments

Next they will be asking "Are you a road cyclist?" in addition to "Are you a smoker?" on annual health insurance enrollment. And yeah, STD and LTD insurance is pretty important when you are the bread winner.
 

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two crashes in the last year, both attributable to the motorists involved.

even with non-life threatening injuries (one out-patient surgery required), total insurance payouts were in excess of $82K.

hard to keep costs down when jerkwads simply drive over you while they eff around on their phones...
 

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in general costs have sky rocketed... so any injury is gonna do that, not only cycling.
 

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two crashes in the last year, both attributable to the motorists involved.

even with non-life threatening injuries (one out-patient surgery required), total insurance payouts were in excess of $82K.

hard to keep costs down when jerkwads simply drive over you while they eff around on their phones...
Where do you live?

I've biked in LA, NE TX, DC metro, and surrounding countrysides. All of my accidents, about 1 every two years, were my own damn fault.

Then again, I've never had to ride on heavily trafficked roads. If the highway has no shoulder, I'll figure out a side road detour. MUTs and residential streets are the way to get around town. They're as safe as walking.

Nonetheless! Hit the ER twice 2 years ago, once breaking a rib, next getting a mild concussion. About $3000. a pop. :frown2: I vowed to avoid crashing as much as possible. That's something to think about when choosing routes as well, so you're not gonna have a drunk or cell phone user smacking you from behind.
 

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The surgery to reconstruct my mangled shoulder cost my employer (through their managed health care plan) on the order of $120,000 (all services included).
 

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Where do you live?

I've biked in LA, NE TX, DC metro, and surrounding countrysides. All of my accidents, about 1 every two years, were my own damn fault.

Then again, I've never had to ride on heavily trafficked roads. If the highway has no shoulder, I'll figure out a side road detour. MUTs and residential streets are the way to get around town. They're as safe as walking.

Nonetheless! Hit the ER twice 2 years ago, once breaking a rib, next getting a mild concussion. About $3000. a pop. :frown2: I vowed to avoid crashing as much as possible. That's something to think about when choosing routes as well, so you're not gonna have a drunk or cell phone user smacking you from behind.

I know a guy here in Lincoln who says he refuses to ride on highways without a shoulder. In Nebraska that means not riding out of town in most places in the State. None but the most majorly trafficked state highways have paved shoulders, ever, in Nebraska. And there are no side road route detours most of the time, unless you're prepared for dirt country no-state-maintenance-"roads".



Which...yea...is why I built a dropbar gravel/touring rig this spring. The cell-zombies stick to paved roads.
 

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If the highway has no shoulder, I'll figure out a side road detour. MUTs and residential streets are the way to get around town. They're as safe as walking.
if you count all incidents, I've been hit 4 times. and every one was the fault of the motorist. three were at controlled intersections where the drivers failed to stop and one was a hit/run from behind. all but one occurred in residential areas, and all had dedicated bike lanes.

so, your sage route selection advice is worthless.
 

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if you count all incidents, I've been hit 4 times. and every one was the fault of the motorist. three were at controlled intersections where the drivers failed to stop and one was a hit/run from behind. all but one occurred in residential areas, and all had dedicated bike lanes.

so, your sage route selection advice is worthless.
Oxtox; (I assume a little twisted diver humor in there?) First,, glad your OK,, are you using a camera?
 

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Oxtox; (I assume a little twisted diver humor in there?) First,, glad your OK,, are you using a camera?
yeah, it's a leftover handle from a dive forum...

don't ride with a camera. however, one incident was captured on a home security camera, driver's ins paid all damages without seeing the footage tho...
 

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Riding road shoulders & gutters is dangerous.

Drivers effectively don't "see" you -- when the last time you paid close attention to stuff on the road side? -- most drivers are basically looking straight ahead.
Majority of car drivers are notoriously bad at judging distances to side -- just look at how many sideview mirrors are sheared off, and sides scraped, by drivers' inability to pull into their garages at 3 mph.

Bike paths or multi-use trails have their own problems. Near me, they're full of joggers, baby strollers, dogs on 20 ft leashes, and beach cruisers weaving back & forth because their owners are rocking out on music or talking on cell phones.

Unless it's some 750 mph, 9 ft wide road, my view is riding normal roads is safe & fine, as long as you:

- "take the lane" or "lane control". eg, read: FAQ: Why do you ride like that? – CyclingSavvy

- super-bright blinky lights front & rear in daytime.
Daytime Running Lights (DRL) have been standard on US cars for at least 15 years -- it reduces crash rates.
A 2012 Danish study of 3800 cyclists, split into "daytime lights" vs "no lights", measured 20% fewer crashes due to all causes for the DRL group, even in tiny, cycling-friendly Denmark: Safety effects of permanent running lights for bicycles: A controlled experiment

Having said all that, I recognize it there may be enough regional & cultural differences in USA, that what works for me may not be universal.
 

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Just browsed what's been written but from an insurance/risk perspective it's not worth talking about unless they are talking about net increase/decrease in medical expenses.

I don't know numbers but I think it's safe to assume cycling decreases medical costs for many people.
Even for those who crash and create a big expense, it can't be said with certainty that their medical costs during a lifetime will have increased as compared to not cycling.
 

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Seems to me that the solution is to increase insurance rates *for the drivers.* :mad:

But that won't happen even though *cars* are causing the injuries.
 
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