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I'm a reasonably fit 46 year old male. When on a one hour run, around 10 minutes per mile, my heart rate averages 160bpm. When cycling for an hour, 15-16 mph, my hr averages 140bpm.

It seems the limiting factor when running is cardiovascular, I run out of breath before I run out of 'leg'. The limiting factor when cycling are my legs, my legs give out before my heart/breathing does.

Is this the norm or does it just mean that my cycling muscles are not as strong as my running muscles.
 

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Running uses more muscle groups than cycling. The cardiovascular system has to supply oxygen to all the different muscle groups. In cycling, you are using the quads and very little else. Only one muscle group to supply and one muscle group to do all the work.
 

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eyefly said:
I'm a reasonably fit 46 year old male. When on a one hour run, around 10 minutes per mile, my heart rate averages 160bpm. When cycling for an hour, 15-16 mph, my hr averages 140bpm.

It seems the limiting factor when running is cardiovascular, I run out of breath before I run out of 'leg'. The limiting factor when cycling are my legs, my legs give out before my heart/breathing does.

Is this the norm or does it just mean that my cycling muscles are not as strong as my running muscles.
I'm not a trainer, but I believe the muscles adapt to what they are trained for. Because I cycle much more than I run, my muscles are more efficient at cycling than they are at running.

For longer rides/runs, I also suspect that an indivduals skill level can come into play. For example, I've seen some runners/cyclists that look very smooth, making it look effortless, while others appear to be bouncing/mashing etc.
 

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A calorie is a calorie

thenazz said:
does cycling for an hour with a HR of, say, 150 BPM burn as many calories as running for an hour at the same HR?
Yes.

Usually your heart rate is a pretty good indicator for determining your individual intensity for any given activity. For example, my heart rate monitor uses my average heart rate over a period of time (as well as my age, height, resting heart rate and weight) to compute how many calories I've burned. The particular activity does'nt matter. It could be swimming, running, cycling, or even mowing the lawn.
 

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Cadence?

eyefly said:
It seems the limiting factor when running is cardiovascular, I run out of breath before I run out of 'leg'. The limiting factor when cycling are my legs, my legs give out before my heart/breathing does.
Sounds like you should be using lower gears. Then general rule is that if it feels like your legs are limiting you, shift to a lower gear and pedal faster. If it feels like the lungs are limiting, shift to a bigger gear.
 

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eyefly said:
I'm a reasonably fit 46 year old male. When on a one hour run, around 10 minutes per mile, my heart rate averages 160bpm. When cycling for an hour, 15-16 mph, my hr averages 140bpm.
Do you find that the same is true climbing? 15-16 is pretty slow if you are riding on the flats. How about riding a little faster (not that I want to get the average speed thread going again... but really, that's not fast, unless you are climbing) or hitting the big climbs in your area?

That's funny... not that I use HR much on the bike anymore (using PM... but sometimes can't resist throwing the strap on), but I find that running there's no way that I can get my hr over 165 for any sustained period. Basically if I do, I'm ready to puke after half a mile. Cycling, however, I can do 175 for an hour any day any time.

For me, probably has something to do with running about 80 miles a year and cycling about 5,000.
 
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