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Did you know guys, A May 2012's data highlight that bicyclists in the United States save at least $4.6 billion a year by riding instead of driving. The data was released during the National Bike to Work Day which held on May, 2012.

So proud to be a cyclist:7:
"The League of American Bicyclists, Sierra Club, and the National Council of La Raza also announced that the average annual operating cost of a bicycle is $308"
guess people on this board is not the average cyclist :)
 

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Who the F wrote that article? There were so many grammatical errors in the first paragraph that I stopped reading it. I can't place much credence in someone who is inarticulate.
 

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Certainly not the cyclist the article is talking about. In fact, I would guess that most people here throw a bike into / onto a car and drive somewhere to start their ride or race. There goes that 4.6 billion a year....
I'm guilty as charged. Unfortunately for group rides we all drive to a central meeting point to start from. When riding alone I just ride from home. I also would love to commute to work by bike every day but a 28 mile one way ride on some of the most dangerous roads in Maryland doesn't make me feel safe. There's some challenging and fun climbs both directions that would make this a wonderful workout for me. Just the savings in gas alone is highly appealing. Dangerous drivers suck!!!
 

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I also would love to commute to work by bike every day but a 28 mile one way ride on some of the most dangerous roads in Maryland doesn't make me feel safe.
I can relate to that. Before retirement, I commuted by 3-cylinder Chevrolet "Sprint" (arghhh!) 40 miles one-way to work.

And on that point: bicycle-related comparisons between Europe and the U.S. often cite infrastructures, traffic laws, motorists' attitude and such. But what makes it so difficult to commute in the U.S. compared to Europe is first and foremost the immense distance between the places you want to be. One small town with housing, schools, shops and recreational facilities I lived in in Germany would easily fit into the space occupied by the (eastern) interchange between Interstate 295 and Interstate 64 near where I live now. Obviously, doing everything by bicycle was easy in that town.
 

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I can relate to that. Before retirement, I commuted by 3-cylinder Chevrolet "Sprint" (arghhh!) 40 miles one-way to work. And on that point: bicycle-related comparisons between Europe and the U.S. often cite infrastructures, traffic laws, motorists' attitude and such. But what makes it so difficult to commute in the U.S. compared to Europe is first and foremost the immense distance between the places you want to be. One small town with housing, schools, shops and recreational facilities I lived in in Germany would easily fit into the space occupied by the (eastern) interchange between Interstate 295 and Interstate 64 near where I live now. Obviously, doing everything by bicycle was easy in that town.
It would be nice to have the infrastructure here. Many time while commuting to work I look over at all that wasted real estate between the highway I travel that would make a nice bike path. It would be a relatively flat and boring trail but it would be 85% of my commute before hitting the roadways. Oh, if only us Americans had a bit of forethought!!!
 

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It would be nice to have the infrastructure here. Many time while commuting to work I look over at all that wasted real estate between the highway I travel that would make a nice bike path. It would be a relatively flat and boring trail but it would be 85% of my commute before hitting the roadways. Oh, if only us Americans had a bit of forethought!!!
Yep. Instead the same jerks who resent our being on "their" roads are the same jerks who would NEVER vote for any of their hard-earned money to be "wasted" on cycling paths.
Sometimes I wish I had a jersey that read;
I'M
SAVING
YOU
GAS!!
JACKASS
 
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Yep. Instead the same jerks who resent our being on "their" roads are the same jerks who would NEVER vote for any of their hard-earned money to be "wasted" on cycling paths.
Sometimes I wish I had a jersey that read;
I'M
SAVING
YOU
GAS!!
JACKASS
I got custom jerseys made by AK Apparel. It's worth a shot.
 

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Certainly not the cyclist the article is talking about. In fact, I would guess that most people here throw a bike into / onto a car and drive somewhere to start their ride or race. There goes that 4.6 billion a year....
Bingo, I would drive a lot less if I did not ride/race. what would my carbon footprint look like for my trips to inrace in the Tour de Tucson. 180 miles in a 4X4 to get to seattle over the pass, flight from sea to tuc, , rental car for 2-3 days sometimes race 109 miles, then return home. Not to mention all the MTB and local races, CX is a 250 mile day every race :cryin:
 

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And on that point: bicycle-related comparisons between Europe and the U.S. often cite infrastructures, traffic laws, motorists' attitude and such. But what makes it so difficult to commute in the U.S. compared to Europe is first and foremost the immense distance between the places you want to be. One small town with housing, schools, shops and recreational facilities I lived in in Germany would easily fit into the space occupied by the (eastern) interchange between Interstate 295 and Interstate 64 near where I live now. Obviously, doing everything by bicycle was easy in that town.
Exactly. The infrastructure of our great United States was built in a post-war cheap oil economy, so everything catered to the new marvelous modern automobile. Freedom! Get out of the cities and live "in the country"! What a dream! Progress!

And we bought it. Hook, line, and sinker. And look where it got us. Shuttling back and forth to jobs. Shuttling kids to sports practice. Driving 15 miles to the store to pick up a gallon of milk. And of course, we put our bikes in our cars and drive them just so we can ride them.

All of this used to be done on foot, and we used to build our communities around that. It worked for centuries, and indeed, when we run out of oil, we'll have to do it again, but we will probably pay dearly in much of the US for having wasted our resources on our modern car-centric system.

I myself live in NYC, and I commute to work by bike. Here, I can. When I lived in VT, I couldn't. I had a 60 mile commute each way. Except for the luxurious amount of podcast listening, I hated that drive. I hope I never have to live that far from work again, but I know I won't be in NYC all my life either. I plan to live closer to a small town or small city, so that I can ride or walk where I need to go.

Having said that, I'm now off to do a tuneup on my car right now, so I can drive to a race in CT next week.
 

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It would be great if this were true. Unfortunately, I don't believe a word of it. Also, I'm guessing most of the commuting miles are miles already being run by mass transit, so the cyclists are only adding to congestion.

If you do a total lifecycle analysis of commuting, including mortality/morbidity, I'd bet you're running a deficit in energy and person-years of healthy life saved.

Unfortunately (again) data like this is developed by true believers, and not by rational, unbiased analysts.

Speaking of "true believers", if you have to do a tuneup of your car, your car, even if tuned perfectly, is so out of date on a technological basis that it is spewing out multiples of pollutants that modern vehicles emit. It's been a couple of decades since a vehicle of mine has needed a "tuneup".
 
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