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So i know another crazy pittcanna wants another bike thread gasp. I want to know what setup is the best a 2X11 or a 1X11.

I love sram drive-trains and the cx1 groupset for a cyclecross bike looks kinda cool. Less moving parts, and wide rear cassette. So is a 2x11 far superior or just different feel all together?
 

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If you plan to race CX you might consider the 2x drivetrain. Reason is, in muddy/snowy conditions, your cassette and rear der can get gummed up to the point where they don't work very well and you'll be happy to keep your chain on ANY cog that still works. In that situation, having 2 chainrings will still give you some semblance of "high" and "low" gears to use.
 

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If you are just using the CX bike for training or gravel grinding or more casual riding, then 1X11 works just fine. It's kind of nice to not have to monkey with shifting the front if you don't have to. Simpler to maintain too.

For racing it's a different story. I've gone back and forth between single and double setups. Single ring is simpler to deal with, and you might find it to be more reliable (i.e. less problems with chain coming off, or problems shifting when you want). But, sometimes the 1X11 setup's gear range is not a perfect setup for the particular course. For instance, a slow/muddy/hilly/technical course may keep you in small gears most of the time, so I would purposely swap out my front chain ring for a smaller one in that case. Conversely, a fast/dry/flat/non-technical course will be best with a bigger chainring up front. With a double ring setup, you don't really need to change things around for the particular course because you've got a wider gear range. But, more things can go wrong with a double setup sometimes.
 

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If you have to ask the question....

IOW, if you do no KNOW that 1x will do what you need it to do, go 2x.
 

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So i know another crazy pittcanna wants another bike thread gasp.
Heck, what does the above string of words even mean? Should this be parsed as:

"[crazy pittcanna] wants another [bike thread] gasp"?

Or "another crazy [pittcanna wants another bike] thread, gasp"?

Or "another, `crazy, pittcanna wants another bike'-thread, gasp"?

:rolleyes:
 

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I believe that your last interpretation is correct.

Although I'm not really tempted by a true CX bike, I have to admit some of the bikes in the 'adventure' category are pretty appealing.
 

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If you are just using the CX bike for training or gravel grinding or more casual riding, then 1X11 works just fine. It's kind of nice to not have to monkey with shifting the front if you don't have to. Simpler to maintain too.

For racing it's a different story. I've gone back and forth between single and double setups. Single ring is simpler to deal with, and you might find it to be more reliable (i.e. less problems with chain coming off, or problems shifting when you want). But, sometimes the 1X11 setup's gear range is not a perfect setup for the particular course. For instance, a slow/muddy/hilly/technical course may keep you in small gears most of the time, so I would purposely swap out my front chain ring for a smaller one in that case. Conversely, a fast/dry/flat/non-technical course will be best with a bigger chainring up front. With a double ring setup, you don't really need to change things around for the particular course because you've got a wider gear range. But, more things can go wrong with a double setup sometimes.
You're basically describing the benefit of 1x and why you should run it if you race. Install the correct ring for the course and have simpler and much more reliable shifting.
 

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You're basically describing the benefit of 1x and why you should run it if you race. Install the correct ring for the course and have simpler and much more reliable shifting.
Well, sort of. I was trying to say though that there are tradeoffs. And when you are racing you probably want to be very particular in the choice of 1X vs 2X. Yes, IMO 1X has the benefit that it is simpler and more reliable overall. But, if you've got a course where you have both fast sections and technical sections where you could also use the low gear, then a 2X would be better. Also, if you have the luxury of a pit crew so that you can swap for a clean bike on any lap, then the risk of problems is less with the 2X.
 

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I just test-rode a Santa Cruz mtn bike today that has 1 X 11. I'm not sure why, but maybe something to do with how the frame shock works. Anyway, I don't see any advantage apart from not having a front derailleur to shift, but the proper solution to this problem is spelled Di2. My old mtn bike has a triple, and the lowest gears are too low. The 1 X 11 was certainly adequate for my needs, but I fail to see why it is an advantage. I had some trouble on some hills, but it wasn't the gearing; it was the incompetence of the pilot. Nothing obligates you to shift the front derailleur, but I kind of like having that option when I need it. If you keep it adjusted, the chain usually doesn't fly off even with mechanical shifting. But get Di2 and hydraulic discs. They look nice on a steel frame...

Less moving parts
Don't you mean "Fewer moving parts"? :winkie-of-absolution:
 

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The 1 X 11 was certainly adequate for my needs, but I fail to see why it is an advantage.
Off topic and just my opinion, but I think that a lot of the appeal of 1X set ups in the off-road world originated with the advent of 29" wheels on MTBs. Going to a 1X allows the rear triangle to stay smaller to offset poor handling/climbing that would otherwise result from having too long of chainstays. Combine that with modern trail design (easier climbing) and the nice quiet operation that 1X also gives and viola', "let's sell it to everybody".

Those of us who ride MTBs in places with long, steep, sustained climbs, (and who just came out of knee surgery:mad:) aren't sold.
 

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Off topic and just my opinion, but I think that a lot of the appeal of 1X set ups in the off-road world originated with the advent of 29" wheels on MTBs. Going to a 1X allows the rear triangle to stay smaller to offset poor handling/climbing that would otherwise result from having too long of chainstays. Combine that with modern trail design (easier climbing) and the nice quiet operation that 1X also gives and viola', "let's sell it to everybody".

Those of us who ride MTBs in places with long, steep, sustained climbs, (and who just came out of knee surgery:mad:) aren't sold.
You have my sympathies. I came out of ankle surgery 3 years ago, but I was still feeling this. (BTW, I did much of my recovery on my mtn bike with the triple. Best wishes for your recovery. I noticed on this thing my knees hurt a bit on the long climbs. They were my pedals and shoes, so I am thinking it might be the large Q-factor on the 27.5+. The dropper post would have made me happy 3 years ago, when I was using crutches to climb on the bike.)
 

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Off topic and just my opinion, but I think that a lot of the appeal of 1X set ups in the off-road world originated with the advent of 29" wheels on MTBs. Going to a 1X allows the rear triangle to stay smaller to offset poor handling/climbing that would otherwise result from having too long of chainstays. Combine that with modern trail design (easier climbing) and the nice quiet operation that 1X also gives and viola', "let's sell it to everybody".

Those of us who ride MTBs in places with long, steep, sustained climbs, (and who just came out of knee surgery:mad:) aren't sold.
I'm not sure that it has anything to do with 29ers that supposedly allow for "easier climbing". Rather, I think has to do with the combination of drivetrains that can accomodate more gears and a wider range of coggs in the rear cassette, along with trails designed by IMBA standards.

Most of the trails that I ride have been redone to the IMBA sustainable trail standards, which in part has eliminated the super steep fall line climbs that used to require a granny gear. I ride pretty much everything in the middle ring, and sometimes make use of the big ring. The granny gear has been made obsolete!

Now when I'm racing the MTB, the courses tend to be a bit more demanding, with a bit of some old-school stuff mixed in. I find that I need the granny gear, and I also want the big ring to go fast on the flatter open sections.
 
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