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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK so I have the whole dismount thing down I have no problem getting off <no pun intended>

But getting back on is a whole other story. i have read the good words and every time I try and swing back over and land on my thigh I meet with varying results. Anyone have any pointers?

best

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well i guess there is only one thing left to do.. suck it up and buy a thicker chamois.

so do you end up landing full force on the seat?
 

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Dan0930 said:
well i guess there is only one thing left to do.. suck it up and buy a thicker chamois.

so do you end up landing full force on the seat?
I am far from the expert as I only ride my crosser not race it. But it seems that they land on the seat and cranks at the same time. Seat taking most of the blow and cranks used to stabilize the "mount".
 

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1) you want to land with the center of the seat hitting right about where your wallet would be, then just slide into correct position. Smashing your croch into the seat just invites disaster.

2) It's really important to keep a nice low trajectory, you want to avoid leaping high into the air and smashing down on the bike, there's no point. Also, if you are jumping too high, it tends to make your chain fall off, causes flats, etc.

3) I like to shove the bike ahead of me a little and jump so I am clearing the saddle flom the rear, rather than the side, again you dont need as much height and your weight is moving in the direction of travel.

Try to practice getting on the bike with as little height and bouce as possible, you might have to do it 30 times in a race, no sense wasting energy. Once you "get it" you should never, ever smash your crotch.
 

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Not too dificult to do. While I have only raced cross 1x, I didn't have too much difficulty with the remount. I found that it was easier than it sounds/looks. I just practiced a few times in my yard (I have 1.5 + acres!) and was able to do it pretty quickly. FWIW, I'm 45 y/o and not excactly a "gifted" athlete, if you know what I mean ;-)
 

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Kram59 said:
Not too dificult to do. While I have only raced cross 1x, I didn't have too much difficulty with the remount. I found that it was easier than it sounds/looks. I just practiced a few times in my yard (I have 1.5 + acres!) and was able to do it pretty quickly. FWIW, I'm 45 y/o and not excactly a "gifted" athlete, if you know what I mean ;-)
As I've stated before, getting the skills down is really important for racing. Here are a couple more pointers ...

1) If you haven't done several hundred dismounts/mounts before your first race, then you haven't done enough. You want to be perfect every time because when you get tired -- which is 100% guaranteed to happen during a race -- you get sloppy. You want those engrams burned into your brain so you don't even have to think about it.

2) Don't practice the skill when you're tired. As I stated before, when you're tired, you get sloppy. You want to practice perfect skills.

3) Don't stutter step / skip step / hop step (whatever you want to call it) when remounting. If you notice you have this malady, eliminate it post haste.

4) A danger of remounting slightly from the rear without enough height is getting your lycra caught on the back of the seat. Its happened to me -- only during a race and when I was tired. If you do this, you look stupid and lose precious time/feet.

5) I'd like to reiterate the advice not to leap too high on a remount. Been there, done that, got a pinch flat on hard ground. DNF.
 

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ditto #3

Gripped said:
3) Don't stutter step / skip step / hop step (whatever you want to call it) when remounting. If you notice you have this malady, eliminate it post haste.
'K smart boy, exactly HOW do you eliminate it? I've had the damnable stutter step for going on six years now and can't seem to get rid of it. Even Burney's book doesn't seem to have any concrete solutions on how to get rid of this habit.

Gripped is right, don't develop this habit. It can lose you 10-20 seconds PER DISMOUNT as it means you effectively come to a standstill to remount.
 

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ok i'm brand new to CX and was figuring out the mount last night and got it pretty good (i think but i'm sure the experts can correct me if i'm wrong). but i found that if i approach it as if i'm just throwing my thigh onto the saddle instead of jumping onto the bike all together it made it way easier. and i started without the jump but doing it this way had me leaping on with just a few trys. i also noticed that the leap is almost all in your legs and your hands are more there to keep you with the bike. the harder i swung my legs in an upward direction the higher i got. as far as getting the smooth run-to-mount rythm down....still working on it. but i think this is a good start.
 

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commitment

When you remount you have to really commit to it...i.e. leap onto the saddle with both feet in the air. Sometimes it looks like you're clicking your heels and doing a bit of a scissor kick behind the back wheel. If you aren't fully commited to the remount you will stutter step and the remount will be sloppy causing you to lose precious momentum.

The way that I learned to remount and got rid of the stutter step/hop was to practice over and over and over. I started in slow motion, just getting a feel for lifting my right leg up and feeling the saddle on the inside of my thigh.

Gradually I started to add speed and what I found was that the remount was actually easier as I went faster. One thought that helped me was to focus on 'jumping' off of my left foot and not just going up on my toes. If you just try to ~reach~ your leg over without actually getting airborne you will inevitably stutter...or miss the saddle entirely.

Try running along side your bike as if you were about to remount and practice jumping off of your left foot, but not trying to remount. This will get you used to getting airborne and committing to the remount. Once you have gotten comfortable jumping go ahead and attempt a remount.

The keys are practice and commitment. Once you get it be sure to continue to practice to reinforce the proper technique. Before long you'll be landing the inside of your thigh on the saddle without even thinking about it.
 

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lonefrontranger said:
'K smart boy, exactly HOW do you eliminate it? I've had the damnable stutter step for going on six years now and can't seem to get rid of it. Even Burney's book doesn't seem to have any concrete solutions on how to get rid of this habit.

Gripped is right, don't develop this habit. It can lose you 10-20 seconds PER DISMOUNT as it means you effectively come to a standstill to remount.
I've found myself doing the stutter step a few times and I just concentrated on commiting to the leap. I agree with cbass, commitment is key.

If you've got the stutter step bad, you might want to lower your seat about as far as it will go and practice remounts in slow motion. Increase speed and seat height until you have it down. The first attepts should really amount to throwing your leg over the seat and sitting down with no real "leap." You might feel silly, but do it until you feel comfortable before raising the seat a little.
 

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p lo said:
land on your inner thigh and slide on to the seat
That's what you're not seeing in the photos. You don't land on your crotch, you land on the inner thigh and slide over at the same time you're finding your pedals.

It works, trust me.

Best bet is to find the local cross hotshot and ride with them a bit. I had the pleasure of training with a few of the fast guys in San Diego and was amazed at how smooth and fast they were. My own mounts and dismounts were clumsy and slow by comparison, but I learned a lot!

M
 

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Gripped said:
As I've stated before, getting the skills down is really important for racing. Here are a couple more pointers ...

1) If you haven't done several hundred dismounts/mounts before your first race, then you haven't done enough. You want to be perfect every time because when you get tired -- which is 100% guaranteed to happen during a race -- you get sloppy. You want those engrams burned into your brain so you don't even have to think about it.

2) Don't practice the skill when you're tired. As I stated before, when you're tired, you get sloppy. You want to practice perfect skills.

3) Don't stutter step / skip step / hop step (whatever you want to call it) when remounting. If you notice you have this malady, eliminate it post haste.

4) A danger of remounting slightly from the rear without enough height is getting your lycra caught on the back of the seat. Its happened to me -- only during a race and when I was tired. If you do this, you look stupid and lose precious time/feet.

5) I'd like to reiterate the advice not to leap too high on a remount. Been there, done that, got a pinch flat on hard ground. DNF.
I'm having fits with #3...

Gotta work on that still!

M
 

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to eliminate the stutter, a good drill is dismount, then three steps, then swing up and remount and clip in. Do it on easy terrain but restrict it to three steps on the ground. You will tend to do a little hop step at slow speeds, like on a false flat after an uphill, mostly you want to get back on the bike and get underway before you loose your momentium.

Another little thing to practice is getting you bike up on and off your shoulder in one fast movement, before you take the second step, it should be on your shoulder and under control so you can run, then set it down in one non-jumpy movement and leap on the bike almost in the same slice of time and get clipped in right away.

Something promoters like to do is throw a section where a good rider can remound and clip in before the hill gets steeper, so practice getting clipped in quick even when you are almost stopped on the bike. Try it with your eyes closed.

I have to add that I did my first "cross" race of the season today, I was able to eek out a victory in the expert race at a local MTB event on my new cross bike without any parts flying off. Couple hours of pounding makes me feel my age tonight...
 

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OK, I am very much a newbie at 'cross. I will be buying my first cross bike next month and am planning on at least a few races. My background is road and triathlon.
When you remount, which thigh do we want to hit the seat?? If I am remounting from the left of the bike, I will be swinging my right leg over. Do we want to land on the left thigh or land on the right thigh?? And are we jumping up so both feet leave the ground at the same time?? I guess clipping in a shoe and swinging the opposite leg over takes too much time??
Man, I am getting scared just looking at those pics !!! :confused:

Thanks,
Ken
 

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don't make it too hard. You are always running with your bike on your right side. You jump on the bike just like a rider on the old wild west movies, leaping off your left foot, flying just high enough to clear the saddle and landing on your right buttock right where your wallet would be. Hands are on the tops, so now you can get settled straight on the seat and get clipped in, hopefully without looking at your feet. You should have shifted the bike in the correct gear before you jumped off, so just start riding, no big deal.
 
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