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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The 1985 Schwinn Supersport with 25" Columbus tube frame and the recent addition of 180mm cranks which used to be run on a Motobecane of the same size back in the 1990s. This is a nice fast bike, originally found at a local garage-sale for $10 several years ago. Lots of fun............

Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Plant


The 1981 Motobecane wearing the 180mm cranks back in 1997:
Bicycle Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Wheel Bicycle frame Bicycle handlebar
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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As a guy who rides larger frames (although not quite THAT large...), it seems that good deals can be had in those sizes, now that everybody seems to buy the smallest frame they can fit in. Also, the SCHWINN badge probably helps, since nearly everybody immediately thinks 'heavy and cheap' when you mention the name Schwinn. 180mm cranks are also about as rare as hen's teeth today...

Although it wasn't 'traditional', I'd relocate those downtube shifters if I were you. On a 25" frame, it's a LOOOOONG way down to the downtube. There are numerous bar-end shifter mounts available, although on a big frame like that, you'll need to look for extra long cables.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Also, the SCHWINN badge probably helps, since nearly everybody immediately thinks 'heavy and cheap' when you mention the name Schwinn.
And to think when I was growing up in the 1970's, if you didn't ride a Schwinn, the cool kids wouldn't talk to you.

How times have changed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yesterday I modified the seat-post so I could spin it around 180 degrees and get the seat level, also put some old Time-brand pedals on the bike which I have had laying in a box over 20 years. I was able to buy a pair of used Shimano shoes to fit my huge size-13 feet off a local classified !!! With the seat now where I like it and the Time pedals I am all set to see if I can set a personal records for the year around one of my favorite local routes. If the wind cooperates it was pretty easy to cruise at 20mph with this bike, with the seat in a better position and the Time pedals I am guessing it might give me a bit more.

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Plant Automotive tire Sports equipment Bicycle part Carbon
 

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Looks like my matching frame is a 24", so a size smaller. Measuring that inspired me to measure the frame sitting next to it in the shed: the 21" Jupiter Beat my dad rode to Jr. High in the early 70s. Hmmm. Somehow I thought it was smaller than that. I wonder if the 105 groupset on my 2001 Trek might be made to fit. You may have inspired a winter project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Looks like my matching frame is a 24", so a size smaller. You may have inspired a winter project.
I wish I had a 24", it would let me try dropping the bars down a bit more, but maybe I will get used to this. In a bit of wind today I was able to average about 20.4mph with this setup over a 12 mile test circuit, I don't think I have the power or ambition to do any better, and I don't think there is anything left to do to this bike to make it faster either.
 

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I wish I had a 24", it would let me try dropping the bars down a bit more, but maybe I will get used to this. In a bit of wind today I was able to average about 20.4mph with this setup over a 12 mile test circuit, I don't think I have the power or ambition to do any better, and I don't think there is anything left to do to this bike to make it faster either.
The 21" Jupiter Beat is the one that might be made to work for me and has some sentimental value. The 24" Schwinn is far too big. If you're ever in the Crawford County, WI area and interested, hit me up. I could probably be persuaded to part with it. Paint is chipped, some surface rust but nothing structural. BB feels sandy, but turns freely. Headset has a slight catch that isn't hard to turn through: probably a pitted bearing.
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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And to think when I was growing up in the 1970's, if you didn't ride a Schwinn, the cool kids wouldn't talk to you.
Interesting. In my northeastern city (which back then had a strong economy), foreign bikes reigned; for the lower-end, there was a plethora of off-brand Belgian bikes, your typical Motobecanes, Peugeots and the like, and if you wanted a more 'upright' bike, you bought a Raleigh. By the time I got into high school, most of the 'cool kids' were riding Fuji's, but I think that was partly because a popular local bike/ski retailer specialized in that brand. Still see a TON of 40+ year-old Fujis around here. Schwinns were mostly 60's vintage bikes, owned by the lower-paid working class in the declining 'railroad village' near our suburb. The joke around my H.S was that if you rode a Schwinn, you probably lived in the trailer park that was just about halfway in-between.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Interesting. In my northeastern city (which back then had a strong economy), foreign bikes reigned; for the lower-end, there was a plethora of off-brand Belgian bikes, your typical Motobecanes, Peugeots and the like, and if you wanted a more 'upright' bike, you bought a Raleigh. By the time I got into high school, most of the 'cool kids' were riding Fuji's, but I think that was partly because a popular local bike/ski retailer specialized in that brand. Still see a TON of 40+ year-old Fujis around here. Schwinns were mostly 60's vintage bikes, owned by the lower-paid working class in the declining 'railroad village' near our suburb. The joke around my H.S was that if you rode a Schwinn, you probably lived in the trailer park that was just about halfway in-between.
Interesting. Once your age made Schwinn Stingrays no longer cool, Raleigh road bikes were cool.

Of course if you had a Stingray with one of those banana seats with the high back, you were REALLY BAD!
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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Interesting. Once your age made Schwinn Stingrays no longer cool, Raleigh road bikes were cool.

Of course if you had a Stingray with one of those banana seats with the high back, you were REALLY BAD!
Well, I was in a bike club back then, and NOBODY ever showed up for a club ride in a Stingray. They were more popular in the west-side suburbs, but not in the east-side. Also, they didn't make a large enough frame for somebody my height, and I wasn't going to ride with my knees nearly hitting the ape-hang bars (the way quite a few kids did back then). There was a clear divide between those who were cyclists, and those who rode Stingrays (or Huffy knock-offs). Stingrays were more of a thing with the under-10 crowd.

And Raleighs were never terribly 'cool' (aside from the rare twin-stick stingray knock-off Raleigh made..), they were practical and reliable, and made a good serious commuter; at least until quality started to wane..
 

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Well, I was in a bike club back then, and NOBODY ever showed up for a club ride in a Stingray. Stingrays were more of a thing with the under-10 crowd.
This is precisely the crowd I'm talking about. Pre-teen. Once you turned 11 or 12, a Stingray was way too small and no longer cool because at that age, you realized you could go faster with something else.

Heck, I was one of those unfortunate kids who had a Sears hand me down bike while the cool kids had Stingrays. Once I turned 9, I realized I could go much faster on my older sister's Swinn Breeze. And I didn't give two sh!ts that it was a girly step through bike and single speed, it moved comparitively fast compared to my old Sears junker. The real task was her wrath when I was on it and she couldn't ride it. 😉 After a while, she got a lock so I couldn't ride it anymore. 😩
 

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Russian Troll Farmer
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I dunno....were ANY of us worried about being "cool" before age 10? Gee, at that age, sometimes to have a friend over for a sleepover required having your mom ask his mom if he still wet the bed. I distinctly remember us wearing completely 'uncool' clothes and shoes at least until jr. high school. Heck, I wasn't allowed to wear my hair longer than a crew cut until I was 12. Buster Browns for shoes until at least 7th grade...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
172.5 is around average, not long.
Most all road bikes sold in the USA had cranks between 165mm and 170mm, a lot of mountain-bikes that are brand-name have 175mm cranks. The average length of road-bike cranks is 170mm on brand-name models, so 172.5 is longer than average. Even if you include 175mm MTB cranks as a factor, the average of 165 and 175 is 170. You did learn how to average numbers in math class when you were young right ??? So when actual facts are considered, not opinion, anything over 170mm is longer than average.
 

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Most all road bikes sold in the USA had cranks between 165mm and 170mm, a lot of mountain-bikes that are brand-name have 175mm cranks. The average length of road-bike cranks is 170mm on brand-name models, so 172.5 is longer than average. Even if you include 175mm MTB cranks as a factor, the average of 165 and 175 is 170. You did learn how to average numbers in math class when you were young right ??? So when actual facts are considered, not opinion, anything over 170mm is longer than average.
I think all the working bikes I have are 175mm. The Jupiter Beat I mentioned the cranks are stamped with 7.05, which if it's inches is 179mm.
 

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Most all road bikes sold in the USA had cranks between 165mm and 170mm
Great... now show proof of this claim.
Where are your stats on the number of bikes sold in each size.
You have this right? You didn't just pull numbers from your ass... right?


The average length of road-bike cranks is 170mm on brand-name models, so 172.5 is longer than average.
You did learn how to average numbers in math class when you were young right ???
DERP. You're statistically challenged. You shouldn't be calling out others math abilities.

Trek Madone
Size: 47 165mm length
Size: 50 170mm length
Size: 52 170mm length
Size: 54 172.5mm length
Size: 56 172.5mm length
Size: 58 175mm length
Size: 60 175mm length
Size: 62 175mm length

Average: 171.875 <------(Psstttt.... that's closer to 172.5)


Of course it would be REALLY stupid to just average the crank lengths of the bikes offered. You said "Most all road bikes sold in the USA". So you'd need to look at what was actually sold.


So when actual facts are considered, not opinion,
You've presented zero facts. Only opinion.

You get an F for fail.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Most all road bikes sold in the USA had cranks between 165mm and 170mm, a lot of mountain-bikes that are brand-name have 175mm cranks. The average length of road-bike cranks is 170mm on brand-name models, so 172.5 is longer than average. Even if you include 175mm MTB cranks as a factor, the average of 165 and 175 is 170. You did learn how to average numbers in math class when you were young right ??? So when actual facts are considered, not opinion, anything over 170mm is longer than average.
Where are you coming up with this [email protected]? This could not be more wrong.
 
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