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The live OLN coverage just stated that he was 16th overall and made no mention of him dropping but the cyclingnews.com live feed stated otherwise.

14:26 CEST 99km/112km to go
Today's stage started at 14:45 without Tom Danielson (Discovery Channel), who has been Savoldelli's most important domestique in the mountains. The first hour was very slow: 26 km/h, and it took until 44 km before the first attack was made by mountains leader Baliani (Panaria), Trofeo Fuga Piaggio leader Edaleine (CA), Flores (Euskaltel), Bruseghin (Lampre), and Cioni (Liquigas). That group was brought back, with Lopez (Euskaltel), Serpa (Selle Italia) joining Baliani, Edaleine and Bruseghin in a counter-move. No luck, though.
 

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His website said he was sick.
 

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whit417 said:
I could if it was my job.
Basso kept going last year too. This year hinting that it was perhaps a mental problem that brought it on. The guys that get sick tend to be the ones that are over their limits physically or mentally.

TD is 28 years old and despite the press mantra about him his problem is not lack of experience. Basso is 28, Valverde 26, Boonen 25, Cunego 24 and they all seem to have done ok despite their age. Who knows why he doesn't have what it takes - he may have the physical gifts but not the mental. Just compare Landis' turbulent times at Postal with TD at Disco. A champion doesn't take the bit between the teeth willingly.
 

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Ever stay home?

whit417 said:
I could if it was my job.
Ever stay home from work sick? I'm betting that if you're smart you do. Why? Here are some reasons:

1. You could infect other people. If Danielson was/is sick, there is a good chance that he could get the rest of his teammates sick if he stuck around. Flu is a virus as you all know. Viruses can spread, easily.

2. If he did have the flu, he was more than likely puking his guts out, couldn't keep food down, couldn't eat because he couldn't keep food down, and probably didn't sleep too well. Prognosis? Hardest day of the Giro on the bike looking at him with no food in him, yeah, drop out.

3. If you can't do your job effectively (which most of us can't if we're sick) there is no sense in going to the job that day, if you're sick.

4. As someone else said, try riding even 40 miles with no food, no sleep, and feeling like crap. I'm betting you couldn't make it through that ride. I've tried racing before when sick, and a 2 hour long crit knocked me out for a week, let alone a 100+ mile road race through the high mountains.

Yes, these guys are paid to do a job, and sometimes you get sick. You ride hard when you're sick, you don't recover well. You don't recover well, your performance suffers on down the road. Most of these guys are on the hairy edge of getting sick most of the time, that's what training and racing hard does to you, it effects your immune system, and sometimes makes it go kaput. If he was sick, then he and the team did the right thing. Pushing through it, not the best idea, especially when your guy you're riding for is way out of contention. It makes more then perfect sense to go home, and ride again another day.
 

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When my kidney function was at 8% I tried to arrange my training to produce a peak for the day of my kidney transplant, so he's not getting any sympathy from me.

Sure it's not the smartest thing to ride under some conditions but once you allow yourself to think quitting is ever ok it only gets easier and easier to throw in the towel. What is he, 1/3 in finishing grand tours?
 

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AJL said:
You were in training (for racing I assume) with only 8% kidney function - seriously???
Yes, though at the end I could only do about 5-6 hours a week even totally juiced on EPO. I wouldn't have thought it possible, but the decline in function occurred over a long period so it allowed my body to adapt and compensate much better than possible with a sudden failure. Still needed to take almost every BP drug known to man, throw down 15-20 tums with every meal to keep the pH in range, and adhere to the "if it tastes good spit it out diet" as my nephrologist called it. Basically fat and sugar were ok, everything else a problem.

Hope to hell I never have to go through it again. The 35 pounds of edema I had even made my knees hurt because there was so much fluid it pushed the joints out of place when I rode. But it does give me a good comeback now when some woman complains about bloating.
;-)
 

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Riding with fever in a 3 week race up mountains that even great cyclists won't climb? 99.9% would have quit earlier. I got alot more respect for him now. Funny how some slow ass, weekend warrior, bus driving, frito eating, french loving, WADA-ASO conspirist, armchair bicycle riders can be so critical of a hard working kid. Fragile or not he is a damn good cyclist.

And he isn't afraid of climbing
http://www.tomdanielson.com/pages/hillclimbs.htm
 
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