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David Walsh main excerpts from his interview with Lance in 2001. The interview ensued after Lance's revelations that he worked with Ferrari. I am going to the effort of typing this out, as I feel Lance's words speak for themselves. Any sane person with even a vague interest in cycling can see the nonsense of his words, and his ambiguity to doping.

In David's own words, the interview dealt almost exlusively with Doping:

Q: Cycling is a sport with a doping subculture. When did you start to become aware of that?
A: If you're asking when was the first day that I realized that perhaps this exists in our sport, I don't know the answer because Motorola was white as snow and I was there all the way through '96. Riders like Steve Bauer and Andy Hampsten, these guys were very admirable professionals, clean riders.

Q: What about the 1994 Fleche Wallonne race, when the Gewiss riders finished first, second, and third? Not everyone thought that was normal? How did you feel about it?
A: At the time, I was frustrated because I was in the rainbow jersey and I was close to making that move. Teams have an ability to ride. They already had had a phenomenal spring, so things had been growing, growing, growing. Once a team starts winning - you see it every year, there's always a team that comes out and they get a couple of big wins and the next thing you know, they're on top of the world, and I believe in that momentum.

Q: Are you saying that on the morning after the race, you were 100 percent a believer they had done it clean?
A: The next morning there were obviously articles and people said certain things. If i have to look at that guy and say, "they're cheaters, he's a cheater, the team's a cheater," how could I get up every day and do my job?

Q: Their doctor, Michele Ferrari, made his famous statement on the evening of the racee about EPO being no more dangerous that orange juice. Do you remember your reaction to that?
A:(Long pause) Ahmm, no.

Q: You didn#t wonder what EPO was?
A: I think that sometimes quotes can be taken out of context and I think even at that time I recognised that.

Q: Ferrari didn't come along afterwards and say, "I never mentioned this drug. (The doctor actually said he had been quoted correctly in L'Equipe). Had you heard of EPO?
A: Here we're talking seven years ago. Had I heard of it? Probably.

Q: Ferrari was, in effect, saying he gave it to his guys?
A: I didn't read the article, I don't know.

Q: It is obvious to everybody EPO use became a big thing in cycling in '95 and '96. How conscious were you guys in Motorola that EPO had become a factor in race results?
A: We didn't thin about it. It wasn't an issue for us. It wasn't an option. Jim Ochowicz ran the program that he set out to run, a clean program. Max Testa, the doctor, set out to run a clean program, and that wasn't part of our medical program.

Q: You must have been frustrated at the thought that these guys were using a substance which Ferraro had talked about?
A: There's no proof of that. I wasn't going to sit around and talk about it. This is ages ago for me; that part of my career, that part of my life is finished.

Q: Did you know that Kevin Livingstone was linked with the police investigation into Ferrari in Italy?
A: Yes

Q: Did you discuss it with him?
A: No

Q: Never?
A: (Nods his head)

Q: Even though you would have kown he was a rider who was on Ferrari's books, that was printed in loads of newspapers?
A: You keep coming up with these side stories. I can only speak on Lance Armstrong. I don't want to speak for others. I don't meddle in other people's business.

Q: A guy who is your best friend?
A: In an indirect way, you are trying to implicate our sport again.

Q: I wold have thought it natural you would say, "Kevin, what's this about? Did you go to Ferrari? Is this being made up, did he put your name on his files when you never visited?" You never discussed it, ever?
A: No

Q: Would it shock you to realise that there are Ferrari files on Kevin that indicate he was usnig EPO?
A: I wouldn't believe that.

Q: Even if you saw the files?
A: I wouldn't believe that.

Q: There are files I have seen where Kevin's hematocrit is listed for July 1998 at 49.7. The previous December it is listed at 41.2. Most medical people say a near nine point difference in a hematocrit level in a six month period is highly unusual.
A: I haven't seen the files. I don't know.

Q: Did you evver vivist Michele Ferrari?
A: I did know Michele Ferrari

Q: How did you get to know him?
A: In cycling when you go to races, you see people. There's trainers, doctors, I know every team's doctor. It's a small community.

Q: Did you ever visit him?
A: Have I been tested by him, gone and been there and consulted on certain things? Perhaps.

Q:You did?
A: (Nods in affirmative)



Johan Bruyneel gave an interview in 1999 which defies belief....
Q: This is not a good time for the sport is it?
A: For me, the situation is very simple. Cycling is a sport in a very bad light, and the reason we got there is the fact that, three years ago, the riders accepted too easily the fact that authorities could install blood controls.

Why would a DS with nothing to hiude, be critical of better testing?
 

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Digger28 said:
David Walsh main excerpts from his interview with Lance in 2001. The interview ensued after Lance's revelations that he worked with Ferrari. I am going to the effort of typing this out, as I feel Lance's words speak for themselves. Any sane person with even a vague interest in cycling can see the nonsense of his words, and his ambiguity to doping.

In David's own words, the interview dealt almost exlusively with Doping:

Q: Cycling is a sport with a doping subculture. When did you start to become aware of that?
A: If you're asking when was the first day that I realized that perhaps this exists in our sport, I don't know the answer because Motorola was white as snow and I was there all the way through '96. Riders like Steve Bauer and Andy Hampsten, these guys were very admirable professionals, clean riders.

Q: What about the 1994 Fleche Wallonne race, when the Gewiss riders finished first, second, and third? Not everyone thought that was normal? How did you feel about it?
A: At the time, I was frustrated because I was in the rainbow jersey and I was close to making that move. Teams have an ability to ride. They already had had a phenomenal spring, so things had been growing, growing, growing. Once a team starts winning - you see it every year, there's always a team that comes out and they get a couple of big wins and the next thing you know, they're on top of the world, and I believe in that momentum.

Q: Are you saying that on the morning after the race, you were 100 percent a believer they had done it clean?
A: The next morning there were obviously articles and people said certain things. If i have to look at that guy and say, "they're cheaters, he's a cheater, the team's a cheater," how could I get up every day and do my job?

Q: Their doctor, Michele Ferrari, made his famous statement on the evening of the racee about EPO being no more dangerous that orange juice. Do you remember your reaction to that?
A:(Long pause) Ahmm, no.

Q: You didn#t wonder what EPO was?
A: I think that sometimes quotes can be taken out of context and I think even at that time I recognised that.

Q: Ferrari didn't come along afterwards and say, "I never mentioned this drug. (The doctor actually said he had been quoted correctly in L'Equipe). Had you heard of EPO?
A: Here we're talking seven years ago. Had I heard of it? Probably.

Q: Ferrari was, in effect, saying he gave it to his guys?
A: I didn't read the article, I don't know.

Q: It is obvious to everybody EPO use became a big thing in cycling in '95 and '96. How conscious were you guys in Motorola that EPO had become a factor in race results?
A: We didn't thin about it. It wasn't an issue for us. It wasn't an option. Jim Ochowicz ran the program that he set out to run, a clean program. Max Testa, the doctor, set out to run a clean program, and that wasn't part of our medical program.

Q: You must have been frustrated at the thought that these guys were using a substance which Ferraro had talked about?
A: There's no proof of that. I wasn't going to sit around and talk about it. This is ages ago for me; that part of my career, that part of my life is finished.

Q: Did you know that Kevin Livingstone was linked with the police investigation into Ferrari in Italy?
A: Yes

Q: Did you discuss it with him?
A: No

Q: Never?
A: (Nods his head)

Q: Even though you would have kown he was a rider who was on Ferrari's books, that was printed in loads of newspapers?
A: You keep coming up with these side stories. I can only speak on Lance Armstrong. I don't want to speak for others. I don't meddle in other people's business.

Q: A guy who is your best friend?
A: In an indirect way, you are trying to implicate our sport again.

Q: I wold have thought it natural you would say, "Kevin, what's this about? Did you go to Ferrari? Is this being made up, did he put your name on his files when you never visited?" You never discussed it, ever?
A: No

Q: Would it shock you to realise that there are Ferrari files on Kevin that indicate he was usnig EPO?
A: I wouldn't believe that.

Q: Even if you saw the files?
A: I wouldn't believe that.

Q: There are files I have seen where Kevin's hematocrit is listed for July 1998 at 49.7. The previous December it is listed at 41.2. Most medical people say a near nine point difference in a hematocrit level in a six month period is highly unusual.
A: I haven't seen the files. I don't know.

Q: Did you evver vivist Michele Ferrari?
A: I did know Michele Ferrari

Q: How did you get to know him?
A: In cycling when you go to races, you see people. There's trainers, doctors, I know every team's doctor. It's a small community.

Q: Did you ever visit him?
A: Have I been tested by him, gone and been there and consulted on certain things? Perhaps.

Q:You did?
A: (Nods in affirmative)



Johan Bruyneel gave an interview in 1999 which defies belief....
Q: This is not a good time for the sport is it?
A: For me, the situation is very simple. Cycling is a sport in a very bad light, and the reason we got there is the fact that, three years ago, the riders accepted too easily the fact that authorities could install blood controls.

Why would a DS with nothing to hiude, be critical of better testing?
Absolutely damning.

Q: A guy who is your best friend?
A: In an indirect way, you are trying to implicate our sport again.


Digger, hope incarnate has returned. Why are you so bitter?:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :yikes: :frown2:

I'm sorry.
 

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I particularly enjoyed 'In cycling when you go to races, you see people. There's trainers, doctors, I know every team's doctor. It's a small community'

Now, why would he know all the team doctors do you think?
 

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Bianchigirl said:
I particularly enjoyed 'In cycling when you go to races, you see people. There's trainers, doctors, I know every team's doctor. It's a small community'

Now, why would he know all the team doctors do you think?
Now, I don't want this taken the wrong way, but it was relevent in my own crazy thoughts when I saw this post.

Have you watched "Overcoming?" The documentary of CSC? Apparently many riders from other teams came to CSC's doctor because he knew a lot of answers for muscular problems or something. he had definite specialization in diagnosing/problem solving that riders wanted to get advice from him.

::shrug::

Maybe Lance was a friendly guy, or skipped around for advice from others or maybe he was trying to get some high grade heroin.... I don't know, but I felt that clip of the movie was quite related.
 
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