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Forever a Student
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have some threads about baselayers or sleeves vs no sleeves. We have some discussion on leg coolers going and such. But I'm wondering more big picture stuff here.

What's the secret to riding in oppressive heat and humidity? Outside of an ice sock down the back, what can be done?

When it's cold out, I just put on more layers. Easy. Once those layers soak all the way through and cold wind can get in, I'm done for the day. But that gives me a couple hours usually.

When it's hot, I'm totally soaked through/saturated and streaming/dripping sweat in half an hour. No baselayer or sleeve or headband or ice sock has a chance. I'm talking totally soaked through, as in soaking wet chamois, sweat streaming off of the face and dripping off of the saddle. Push on the helmet a little and the pads will unleash a torrent of sweat. Hands are so wet you want to wipe them to brake and shift better but there's no where to wipe them, even the elastic on the shorts is saturated. So... what gives?

How do people ride in crazy heat and humidity? You can't say they don't because I see them out there in droves. People will wait all year to ride in this crap. They'll not ride at all or ride a stupid trainer if it's not like this outside. If you ask me, this is the only time a year worth being on a trainer.

How do you do it?
 

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I just got used to it eventually. I grew up in a high desert place where it's hot but dry (Reno). When I moved to the humid East, I thought it was impossible. But after 35 years or so, including 10 years in the D.C. area, it just doesn't bother me. I ride, I sweat, I actually like it.

I realize that's not much help, but maybe a change of attitude is at least theoretically possible.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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You get used to it. Turn down the A/C. Just ride in it. Helps to be consistently riding daily so your body gradually adapts to the warmer/more-humid climate of summer. The more you stay inside in 73F with 50% RH, the worse and more oppressive 90F and 73F+ dewpoint feels like.

Lots of water intake. And the other standard hot weather advice, cover up and bank as much activity as you can at off-peak hours. WRT helmet sweat-wear a HeadSweats or hot-weather beanie/skull-cap underneath your helmet....you won't feel much hotter and it reduces the head-drenching a bit in your eyes.


Currently I'm shopping for a pair of long-fingered hot-weather gloves to avoid glove burn...
 

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Forever a Student
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I realize that's not much help, but maybe a change of attitude is at least theoretically possible.
It's going to have to be. I'll just have to expect it and deal with whatever it brings. Drink more, sweat more, deal with it. Maybe stop and wring things out every so often, once it gets dangerous, but otherwise... just deal.



Currently I'm shopping for a pair of long-fingered hot-weather gloves to avoid glove burn...
My hands are hilarious looking, post them up if you find something good. No padding.

I'm thinking of trying out some of those leg cooler things as well. The board has determined the Sugoi ones to probably be best, I will probably try them. I always
do long sleeves and chemicals on the face. Both a headsweats cap and a castelli bandanna for sweat. They help, everything helps, but eventually it's just saturated, everything saturated.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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It's going to have to be. I'll just have to expect it and deal with whatever it brings. Drink more, sweat more, deal with it. Maybe stop and wring things out every so often, once it gets dangerous, but otherwise... just deal.


My hands are hilarious looking, post them up if you find something good. No padding.

I'm thinking of trying out some of those leg cooler things as well. The board has determined the Sugoi ones to probably be best, I will probably try them. I always
do long sleeves and chemicals on the face. Both a headsweats cap and a castelli bandanna for sweat. They help, everything helps, but eventually it's just saturated, everything saturated.
Right about June is where cycling becomes a dawn/dusk activity for me. Try to get out and be back before 11 or after 5. Beat the heat by avoiding it. Less dangerous, although you're still soaked.

Only exception is Tour de Nebraska...which we usually hit the road and break camp and hit the road by 0630, and be done by 12-1.


I already have glove tan happening.....I found these....

Amazon.com : Pearl Izumi - Ride Men's Pro Gel Vent Full Finger Gloves : Sports & Outdoors

Last pair of PI gloves I wasn't thrilled with although I didn't take care of them. Lots of lightweight long finger gloves without padding on Amazon, ones with padding are a tough sell.

Leg coolers...the Sugoi cost twice as much as these:

Amazon.com: Rotibox Unisex Compression Fit Ice Cooler Cooling Leg Sleeves Leg Warmers UV Sun Protection for Outdoor Sports Cycling Basketball Hiking Climbing Indoor activities Even Work-space 1 Pair: Sports & Outdoors

Don't own them....just pointing out alternatives. Brand name technical wear always charges more due to brand.
 

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You get used to it. Turn down the A/C. Just ride in it. Helps to be consistently riding daily so your body gradually adapts to the warmer/more-humid climate of summer. The more you stay inside in 73F with 50% RH, the worse and more oppressive 90F and 73F+ dewpoint feels like.

Lots of water intake. And the other standard hot weather advice, cover up and bank as much activity as you can at off-peak hours. WRT helmet sweat-wear a HeadSweats or hot-weather beanie/skull-cap underneath your helmet....you won't feel much hotter and it reduces the head-drenching a bit in your eyes.


Currently I'm shopping for a pair of long-fingered hot-weather gloves to avoid glove burn...
This! Spot on. Headsweats work pretty well and are more comfortable than I thought they would be. Water alone will slosh on you so I carry one water and one water + Osmo. Try not to drink your carbs, it slows the rate at which the gut empties. Separate eating and hydrating. I get used to it and it doesn't bother me much. Especially if you hit green lights and run stop signs!
 

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Drink plenty of water, with electrolytes. Get ice where you can at rest stops. And HTFU.

I'm racing tomorrow morning--forecast is 81° at race time with 89% humidity and a chance of thunderstorms. I expect to sweat.
 
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Not being a morning person I tend to end up riding in a lot of humid east coast heat. I can't say I like it but once I acclimate to it I seem to get though it. I did notice a couple, of weeks ago when all of a sudden it got really hot I struggled on the first couple of hot days but then after a few rides in the heat, things seemed to get better. There is no secret. Do all the obvious stuff: drink plenty, wear light colors, drink a lot when off the bike, etc. If you don't mind getting up super-early, do that
 

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I always wear a base layer, whether 30 degrees or 98.
When I raced I felt you'd have a little more sliding protection but it really helps wick away moisture.
I drive with no AC and a window down when alone, it helps acclimate you.
 

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As been said, acclimate to the conditions. You can ride into them, so to speak, as it tends to get warmer and more humid over a period of time giving you time to adjust.

Hydration and electrolytes are the lifes blood, so to speak, of riding in the heat.

It can still suck the life out of you, but that is usually more of an issue, for me, after the ride than during it.
 

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when I lived back east, 35C was too hot to ride. 33C was OK. I just go by that.

no mountain biking above 20C; road speed provides cooling.

I think 35C is 95F

go at dawn or dusk when it is cooler. Around here even if it is 30C daytime (which happend maybe 3 days a year), it is 12C at night, or cooler.
 

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Proud luddite
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Here in Tucson we don't have issues with humidity (today it's just 4%!) but obviously the summer heat is oppressive. It's 111 right now, which is a record high for this day. I just get out there early in the morning before the real heat kicks in. This morning I was riding at 5:30 AM, went for about 2 1/2 hours and did o.k. Of course that impacts the rest of my day....early to bed, early to rise you know.
 

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I make Eagles fly
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Here in Tucson we don't have issues with humidity (today it's just 4%!) but obviously the summer heat is oppressive. It's 111 right now, which is a record high for this day. I just get out there early in the morning before the real heat kicks in. This morning I was riding at 5:30 AM, went for about 2 1/2 hours and did o.k. Of course that impacts the rest of my day....early to bed, early to rise you know.
Same here in Vegas , but I ride at night. Once the kids are in bed , I gear up and head out for a nice hour stroll. 100 degrees at the time, but I'm working on perfecting my route to go thru as many golf course areas as possible.

Tuscon foothills, was there for a couple weeks last summer. Freaking dead snakes everywhere at night. Never seen one in the road in Vegas
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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q36.5 does a summer full finger glove. Available at AboveCategoryCycling.

Seems like your just one of those that sweat buckets.
Nope. Parts of the USA, it is hot and humid enough (high enough dewpoint) most of the summer that sweat simply doesn't evaporate. No buckets of sweat necessary. In fact less "parts" and more like the entire Great Plains.
 

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My hands are hilarious looking, post them up if you find something good. No padding.
Those are tan lines I'm just not willing to have... Jersey and bibs, sure, I'll even those out some with plenty of pool time, but the hands? Wedding ring tan line is the only acceptable one on the hands. Even Road ID is managed to avoid a wrist line.
 

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Those are tan lines I'm just not willing to have... Jersey and bibs, sure, I'll even those out some with plenty of pool time, but the hands? Wedding ring tan line is the only acceptable one on the hands. Even Road ID is managed to avoid a wrist line.
Your worried about tan lines on your hands, for Pete's sake, I've got 'em on my head!

I kinda like 'em. In fact, if I get off my bike during a ride, the helmet and gloves stay on for fear of spoiling them. Shux, I've seen plenty of guys wearing wigs that looked a lot more ridiculous than the tan lines on my head.
 

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I sweat a lot more than most people do. Headsweats (for example, Headsweats Classic Cap) has made a gigantic difference for me. If you don't like that, I'm sure there are competitive products from other vendors and manufacturers.
 

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Riding in excessive heat and humidity can be extremely taxing. Here's what I do and what I recommend.

Ride in the early morning when it's cooler.

Back off on your effort level during such weather and/or limit your riding time. A LOT. It's just not healthy OR productive if you're overheating, sweating buckets and trying to separate the oxygen from all that humid air. You may have to reduce your effort level for 1, 2, or more months.

High heat and humidity aren't enjoyable riding conditions for me so I adjust my efforts and expectations accordingly.
 
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