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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are four weekends between now and the Death Ride, leaving the last weekend as a recovery. That means three weeks to gain the confidence that I can ride 15,000 in one day. I was hurting (pleasantly so) after yesterday's 70 mile - 6000' and after two weeks' ago first attempt at the triple crown, climbing 7000' within the first 35 miles of the ride. It seems like the next three weekends should focus on trying to get in stepped climbing workouts that get to ~80% of the Death Ride's accumulated elevation. I'm confident I have 130 miles in my legs, but combining that with the climbing? Not so much... :D


6/14-15 Ride goal: 80 miles, 9-10,000' climbing
6/21-22 Ride goal: 90-100 miles, 11,000' climbing
6/28-29 Ride goal: 115 miles, 13,000' climbing
7/5-6 Recovery ride: 50 miles, 4000' climbing (Eureka Canyon for instance)
7/12 - Death Ride 130 miles, 15,000' climbing


Does sound in line?

Coop
 

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Keep in mind that DR is essentially one big out and back ride. For every foot you climb, you will descend that same foot. So you only have to ride 65 miles, and you can coast the other 65. I say this not to be a wise ass, but because the descents are LONG. What is Carson, 14 miles? Don't worry about the mileage.
 

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thinkcooper said:
6/14-15 Ride goal: 80 miles, 9-10,000' climbing
6/21-22 Ride goal: 90-100 miles, 11,000' climbing
6/28-29 Ride goal: 115 miles, 13,000' climbing
7/5-6 Recovery ride: 50 miles, 4000' climbing (Eureka Canyon for instance)
7/12 - Death Ride 130 miles, 15,000' climbing

Does sound in line?
Should take care of everything except the effects of altitude.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
mohair_chair said:
Keep in mind that DR is essentially one big out and back ride. For every foot you climb, you will descend that same foot. So you only have to ride 65 miles, and you can coast the other 65. I say this not to be a wise ass, but because the descents are LONG. What is Carson, 14 miles? Don't worry about the mileage.
Good comforting thought - thanks! - the majority of the rides I've planned are climb up/coast down as well, so the mileage numbers are kinda irrelevant in those goals as well. If it weren't so boring, I could probably just do five to six repeats on Empire Grade and call it a day.


sometimerider said:
Should take care of everything except the effects of altitude.
Riding around Tahoe was a great barometer for me. I noticed a slight increase in heart rate for the same perceived efforts here. 10 beats max. My goal for the ride is to hold around 160-165 for the climbs. Yesterday's climbs hovered between 165-175, and when it dropped below 168 or so, it felt like I was going into recovery. Holding a lower, easily sustainable heart rate (like 160-165) should allow me to bump it up for the times the pitch increases, and then drop back into that sustainable level for the duration of the climb.
 

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thinkcooper said:
Does sound in line?
If you're doing much hard riding during the week, it'll be a tough schedule.


There are parts of the death ride where you get to pedal both ways- the part along the river from Markleeville to the base of Ebbets, some of the gradual climb to real climb on Ebbets, most of the road from TRP to Woodfords, and the interminable boring flat part between Pickets and the turnoff to Blue Lakes, where the last climb up Carson begins. Don't forget theres something like 500' of climbing on the way back between Woodfords and TRP. Sometimes that last bit of climbing when they thought they were done crushes people' spirits.
 

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In need of sock puppet
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ericm979 said:
If you're doing much hard riding during the week, it'll be a tough schedule.
That advice has me smiling. I'd like a cushy mid-week. Maybe one or two easy round trip commutes (34 miles RT). No time trialling. All lite spin.

I also decided to mount this swanky new Ultegra SL compact crankset after yesterday's 45RPM slog up the final peak on Fremont.
 

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handling

Looks good, if you can survive it. Work on long, steady climbs, staying below threshold. Just make sure you get plenty of rest the last week.

Work on your handling skills, too. There are some narrow, twisty descents, but the road itself is not the problem -- it's the hoards of idiots who will be strewn across the entire road doing their climb while you are descending. I actually had to come to a full stop on one descent because one idiot stopped and was working on his bike, perpendicular to the road, full on the pavement on my side of the road. He got cussed at by several. Also, there will be some there with insufficiently low gears and/or not in shape, and will be weaving across the road on the climbs to make it up. You really have to watch the descents.

Make sure you have your hydration / nutrition down, too. It's thin air and dry, and you'll be sweating much more than you realize. Need to drink plenty even if you don't think you are sweating much.

You pass the start / finish several times, so resist the temptation to call it quits early. You'll be glad when you finish.
 

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thinkcooper said:
Does sound in line?

Coop
Well I'm doing the Blood, Sweat and Gears ride in NC in a couple of weeks.

http://www.bloodsweatandgears.org/main/maps.htm

Suppose to be something like 13,000 feet of climbing. Since I live in a completely flat area and mostly ride a trainer anyway, I'll go into it with probably less than a few 100 feet of climbing in the legs this whole year. I did get out for 3 hours this past weekend, hope to do at least one or two 4+ hour rides between now and then.

So your preparation seems exquisite compared to mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Fixed said:
Looks good, if you can survive it. Work on long, steady climbs, staying below threshold. Just make sure you get plenty of rest the last week.

Work on your handling skills, too. There are some narrow, twisty descents, but the road itself is not the problem -- it's the hoards of idiots who will be strewn across the entire road doing their climb while you are descending. I actually had to come to a full stop on one descent because one idiot stopped and was working on his bike, perpendicular to the road, full on the pavement on my side of the road. He got cussed at by several. Also, there will be some there with insufficiently low gears and/or not in shape, and will be weaving across the road on the climbs to make it up. You really have to watch the descents.

Make sure you have your hydration / nutrition down, too. It's thin air and dry, and you'll be sweating much more than you realize. Need to drink plenty even if you don't think you are sweating much.

You pass the start / finish several times, so resist the temptation to call it quits early. You'll be glad when you finish.

Awesome advice - thank you!

I've got solid handling/descending skills now, and have quick cyclocrosser response times so the foundation is good. I've heard more than a few stories about the hazards of ill-prepared riders. My plan is to go very sanely into the descents, with fresh brake pads.

My wife will be volunteering to do SAG, maybe at Ebbetts, and I'm thinking I'll bring my stepson along to see the craziness as well. If I can plant him at the finish, that'll give me the psychological encouragement to keep going. That's the biggest fear I've got - "There goes the finish line, again..."
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Dwayne Barry said:
Well I'm doing the Blood, Sweat and Gears ride in NC in a couple of weeks.

http://www.bloodsweatandgears.org/main/maps.htm

Suppose to be something like 13,000 feet of climbing. Since I live in a completely flat area and mostly ride a trainer anyway, I'll go into it with probably less than a few 100 feet of climbing in the legs this whole year. I did get out for 3 hours this past weekend, hope to do at least one or two 4+ hour rides between now and then.

So your preparation seems exquisite compared to mine.
Good luck man!
 

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Geeze Coop, I think you're trying to break the record time up there! :)

We're not training quite that hard. I did Horseshoe Meadows out of Lone Pine Saturday (3800' up to 10,100' and back at about 49 miles) and Tioga Pass into Yosimite on Sunday (6800' up to 10,000 and back) but that's been about it and neither too long. Altitude or not you're going be rocking on the ride.
 

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Bacon!
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If they are doing it again, your wife will be working with some friends of mine from the USGS. That's a fun stop to work. Good people.

The advice on dodging other bikers is spot on. I had a guy literally fall over in front of me on Monitor when he couldn't push his double any further. Didn't even try to unclip. Just fell over like a freshly cut tree. Boom. Ouch.

One last bit of advice on the descents: Most of the roads allow for some serious speed. Monitor pass has especially nice pavement. Places to be aware of potential road issues: Monitor pass on the east side just beyond the gate (basically where you first start climbing on the first side of monitor) has an issue with small rocks and sand sometimes ending up on the road. Be aware of this when you're flying. I saw a guy two years ago smack a golf ball sized rock. His rear tire went off like a bomb but he didn't go down. The other place to really watch is dropping into Hermits Valley right after Pass #3 (Ebbits). The road seems like the greatest and funnest descent IMO to cool down on after dying up Ebbits. But, the road has hidden lumps and bumps due to tree roots and stuff under the pavement. One guy went down very, very hard when he launched off of one of these last year. Just be aware of 'em but still enjoy some fun speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ridgetop said:
Geeze Coop, I think you're trying to break the record time up there! :)

We're not training quite that hard. I did Horseshoe Meadows out of Lone Pine Saturday (3800' up to 10,100' and back at about 49 miles) and Tioga Pass into Yosimite on Sunday (6800' up to 10,000 and back) but that's been about it and neither too long. Altitude or not you're going be rocking on the ride.
No records, just want to have it hurt on the weekends before DR. :D

If I can get an RBR jersey before the ride, I think I'll be sporting the forum colors on the ride.
 

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Bacon!
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Right now it doesn't look like we'll get the Lounje wear in time, but I'll be wearing my Phillipe kit.
 

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I've done the Death Ride several years now and twice I've taken a Garmin 301 with me. According to the Garmin, it's almost 23,000 feet of climbing, not 15,000. Both readings were within a couple of feet of each other. Neither here nor there, just letting you know.
 

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23,000, that's a funny one!. gps's pretty much suck for calculating accumulated vert.

Since Alpine County decided they could run this event without the Alta Alpina bike club, the club is testing a new route this weekend for next years "Other" event, you will have the option of riding up to 8 passes for 196 miles :eek:
 

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Sherpa23 said:
I've done the Death Ride several years now and twice I've taken a Garmin 301 with me. According to the Garmin, it's almost 23,000 feet of climbing, not 15,000. Both readings were within a couple of feet of each other. Neither here nor there, just letting you know.
Garmin Forerunner 301 only uses GPS to determine the amount of elevation as opposed to the Edge 305 which uses altimeter + GPS. So what I am saying is that only using GPS is not very reliable for calculating the amount of elevation. This is why sites like motionbased.com can apply corrections for such devices. If you look on motionbased.com and search for Death Ride and find one recorded using a 305 it will be much more accurate and will show closer to 15,000 ft.
 

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Sherpa23 said:
I've done the Death Ride several years now and twice I've taken a Garmin 301 with me. According to the Garmin, it's almost 23,000 feet of climbing, not 15,000. Both readings were within a couple of feet of each other. Neither here nor there, just letting you know.
Yeah, 23,000. That sounds about right. The worst climbs are the hill from Markleeville back to Turtle Rock Park, which is about 3,000 feet on the Garmin 301, and the climb back from Woodfords to the end, which is about 4,000 feet on the Garmin 301. That's where the extra 7,000 feet comes from.
 
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