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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Can you recommend a decent and inexpensive tool set with all the necessary tools to replace a road bike chain?

Lately, the shop has been replacing my chain with crappy or used chains. I'm a beginner, but I want to start doing this on my own.

I see tons of products at Amazon, but I don't know which to choose.

Eventually, I also want to change my cassette, but that's another story.

Thanks.
 

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1. You need a tool that allows you to push a pin out so your chain is the proper length. For most bikes, the out of the box length is too long. I find the cheapo Park or Lezyne tools work just fine. Just make sure its for the right chain (e.g., don't use a tool for a 9-speed chain on an 11-speed chain).
2. You want to use quick links. Toss the pin that comes with a new chain and buy appropriately sized links. They are so much easier and so much more secure than a pin.
 

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I get 5000miles out of my chains, why are you replacing them so often?
How do you know how often he is replacing his chain? He didn't state anywhere how many miles his chains are lasting. Are you psychic?
 

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How do you know how often he is replacing his chain? He didn't state anywhere how many miles his chains are lasting. Are you psychic?
Reading between the lines of the OP it sounds like chain replacement is a pretty regular thing. It would be unusual for a beginner to be riding so many miles that they were changing chains multiple times per year.
 

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Reading between the lines of the OP it sounds like chain replacement is a pretty regular thing. It would be unusual for a beginner to be riding so many miles that they were changing chains multiple times per year.
Maybe he isn't using the best chain lube with PFM. :ROFLMAO:
 

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The thing I find hard to believe is that this "beginner working on bikes" can see the difference between a new and used chain but can't figure out how to use a chain breaker and install a quick link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here's some background on my riding.

I ride my bike mainly to work, and I'm always riding in terrible sidewalks with unexpected horrible potholes and people moving around, or I'm riding in streets with unexpected horrible potholes and cars moving around.

I usually ride in a high gear, so for example, I may be riding and then stop on a dime because a car won't let me pass. So now, I have to start pedaling again as fast as I can in high gear. I'm almost positive this somehow damages the chain or cassette.

In other words, I may not run 5,000 miles, but I do routes where I need to change gears from high to low when I least expect it. And most of the time, I have to start pedaling at the most inconvenient gear because I have no choice.

Right now, the chain and/or the cassette are so bad that I can only ride in high gear; if I ride in a low (easier) gear, the chain somehow doesn't attach to the cassette.

To the point about being a beginner: I'm a beginner working on bikes but not at riding them, if that makes sense.
 

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I would take your bike to a different bike shop. Chain wear is mostly due to friction, pedaling really slow really doesn't wear them out unless you don't lube it. Sounds like a bunch of stuff is out of adjustment. It's a lot easier to learn one thing at a time, when everything is wacko, it is impossible for a newby to fix it.
Lombard? I haven't seen any of his posts lately for some reason.
 

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I'm almost positive this somehow damages the chain or cassette.
Nope. It doesn't. You're not that strong to wear a chain with a few hard pedals strokes.


Right now, the chain and/or the cassette are so bad that I can only ride in high gear; if I ride in a low (easier) gear, the chain somehow doesn't attach to the cassette.
😲 😲 Your ENTIRE drive train is ruined. Completely ruined.
The ONLY fix is to replace everything. Cassette, chain, & chainrings. Maybe even your derailleur pulleys.
If you replace any single component, it will quickly wear and get ruined.
 

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Here's some background on my riding.

I ride my bike mainly to work, and I'm always riding in terrible sidewalks with unexpected horrible potholes and people moving around, or I'm riding in streets with unexpected horrible potholes and cars moving around.

I usually ride in a high gear, so for example, I may be riding and then stop on a dime because a car won't let me pass. So now, I have to start pedaling again as fast as I can in high gear. I'm almost positive this somehow damages the chain or cassette.

In other words, I may not run 5,000 miles, but I do routes where I need to change gears from high to low when I least expect it. And most of the time, I have to start pedaling at the most inconvenient gear because I have no choice.

Right now, the chain and/or the cassette are so bad that I can only ride in high gear; if I ride in a low (easier) gear, the chain somehow doesn't attach to the cassette.

To the point about being a beginner: I'm a beginner working on bikes but not at riding them, if that makes sense.
I'm sorry, but you just need to learn to read traffic better than you're doing right now. If you're getting caught in the wrong gear as often as you're making it sound, you're not paying close enough attention to your surroundings, and what the traffic patterns are.

Your bike has a transmission, utilize it and plan ahead.
 

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I'm sorry, but you just need to learn to read traffic better than you're doing right now. If you're getting caught in the wrong gear as often as you're making it sound, you're not paying close enough attention to your surroundings, and what the traffic patterns are.

Your bike has a transmission, utilize it and plan ahead.
Also... you don't HAVE to start in a hard gear. When you stop, lift your rear wheel, give the crank a spin and shift to an easier gear. Take two seconds.
Wham bam thank you ma'am and you're off.
 
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