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I just bought my dream bike and it is time to get some suitable wheels. I have my eye on those super light American Classic Spirit wheels. However, I'm not sure what style rim to get. It's either the 350s (shallow) or the 420s (deep). Why would anyone go for the heavier (and more expensive) deep dish rims vs. the lighter traditional ones? :confused:

FYI: I've always ridden 32 or 36 spoke open pros and my cycling strength is climbing...the steaper the better, flat TT is my weakness. Let me know what you think...I want to get the right wheelset.
 

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bent_spoke_dave said:
I just bought my dream bike and it is time to get some suitable wheels. I have my eye on those super light American Classic Spirit wheels. However, I'm not sure what style rim to get. It's either the 350s (shallow) or the 420s (deep). Why would anyone go for the heavier (and more expensive) deep dish rims vs. the lighter traditional ones? :confused:

FYI: I've always ridden 32 or 36 spoke open pros and my cycling strength is climbing...the steaper the better, flat TT is my weakness. Let me know what you think...I want to get the right wheelset.
I'm a recreational, non-competitive rider and appreciate whatever speed I can eke out of my equipment. However, for me, a serious part of that speed is finishing without a mechanical problem. Therefore, i go the traditional 32 spoke, 3x route, with Open Pro or MA3 (based on the bike) and appropriate hubs. For me, finishing is more important (and realistic) than possibly finishing 10 minutes sooner. BTW, i also ride lots of hills because I live on top of a big one.... It allows me to believe that flatlanders with aero rims are wimps at heart....
 

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You probably know

There is a weight limitation to the wheels. The hubs don't come with seals (which is why they are so light). They claim that the 420s are the only mid aero wheels suitable for climbing. Zipp claims that the smallest mid's that provide any significant advantage for aerodynamics is 38mm and the 420s are 34mm....

Having said that I can feel an aero difference whe I use my 28mm bladed spoke wheelset but it may be psy...

Ciao,
Sean
 

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Gets down to spokecount....

bent_spoke_dave said:
I just bought my dream bike and it is time to get some suitable wheels. I have my eye on those super light American Classic Spirit wheels. However, I'm not sure what style rim to get. It's either the 350s (shallow) or the 420s (deep). Why would anyone go for the heavier (and more expensive) deep dish rims vs. the lighter traditional ones? :confused:

FYI: I've always ridden 32 or 36 spoke open pros and my cycling strength is climbing...the steaper the better, flat TT is my weakness. Let me know what you think...I want to get the right wheelset.
The real advantage of deep v-shaped rims is probably more strength than aerodynamics. If you look at American Classic's web site, the "Standard" build for the 350's if 28 spokes up front and 32 rear. The "Standard" build on the 420's is 18 spokes front and 24 rear. So the deeper, stronger rim can be built up with less spokes, which compensates somewhat for the heavier rim.

The light-rimmed wheels with more spokes will have less mass at the circumference, and will be easier to accelerate. The heavier rimmed wheels with less spokes are intended to be more aerodynamic. You take your pick, but my preference has been to get the lighter rims and use more spokes. Let us know what you decide.
 

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I think some of this is about feel not speed.

In test riding bikes I notice that really light bikes feel very cool when I accelerate, like they're going to jump out from under me. Once I'm up to speed, however, I climb and roll in the same gear at much the cadence as I do on my old, steel bikes.

Lighter wheels are much the same thing to me. Getting back up to speed after topping a small roller feels so quick and easy with lighter wheels that it makes my choice for me. Am I overall faster than I would be with deep dish wheels? I don't know, but if I were going to buy a pricey set of wheels, I'd go for lightness cause I love that feeling.
 

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Pick the one that you think looks better

Then choose the technical argument that supports your choice. In reality, this is how all bike purchases are made.
 

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I thought that I had read somewhere that the 350's weren't really intended to be an "every day" wheel. I wouldn't want to hit a pothole with any wheel, but even less with the 350's.

Bryan
 

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Analytical Cycling says aero is faster...

Got some free time? Wanna put this debate to rest once and for all?

Go to www.analyticcycling.com and start reading. Then start pluggin in your info and see the results for yourself. In a nutshell, the only time light weight beats aero is in an uphill TT or a finish line sprint. How much time to do spend climbing and sprinting while out on your rides. Climbing means standing up on something steep not just going up a hill. You'll find it's a small % of the time.

Find the deepest section rim you can find (or afford) then choose the number of spokes and build based on your weight, riding style, and roads.

This comes from a guy who is replacing his front AC 350 rim with something heavier and more aero. The wheels on my dream bike would be AC's deep carbon or Zipp 404 clinchers.
 

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Ben - you usually make a lot of sense so I'm looking for more clarification: why 404 clinchers and not tubies? Besides convenience (brake pads, mounting, flatting) I don't see a lot of advantages to those clinchers.

Fwiw, I'm in the process of getting my "dream wheels" and I'm looking at the Reynolds Stratus, 303 tubies (lots of climbing around here) and the Velomax deep dishers.
 

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Only reason...clincher vs. Tuby

JPRider14 said:
Ben - you usually make a lot of sense so I'm looking for more clarification: why 404 clinchers and not tubies?
If the choice were tubular, I'd go with the AC Deep carbon. They are the same rim (Zipp supplies the rim to AC), have a more standard build (easier spoke replacement), and are lighter than the Zipp 404 Tuby.

If clinchers are preferred, than Zipp 404 is the choice only because AC doesn't offer the clincher rim option.

I've tried tubies and have since gone back to clinchers. If faced with these choices, I'd consider purchasing the Zipp 404 clincher rims off eBay ($300 ea.) and building them up on AC hubs. I've owned Zipp 303s and had issues with broken spokes. That is why I'd like to go with more readily available, standard spoke types and more durable lacing patterns.
 
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