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I appreciate all the advice I got in my other post. I ditched the Denali and got a new 2015 Fuji Roubaix 1.0 from my LBS.

I'm working through the bum pain. I have cycling shorts and a gel memory foam seat that I have not added yet. I know that defeats the weight issue, but I'm not there yet. I'm hoping to get there eventually. The seat that came on it is murder!!! I did 30 mile rides on the foam seat and had far less issues.

For weight loss, I try to never stop pedaling regardless of speed. Is that the right approach? I'd like to build endurance as a secondary goal after weight loss.

Should I be trying to stay in the saddle the whole time?

Thanks
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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First off, congrats on the new bike. All the way around, I think you made a good choice.

On the saddle issue, it's a very personal thing, but if the OE saddle is 'murder' and the gel saddle was tolerable, ask your LBS to install and adjust it for you. To maintain your fit, this isn't a DIY type thing.

On the pedaling question, I'm a believer in keeping a smooth pedal stroke and fairly high cadence, but I don't pedal downhill. Seems pointless since you can actually gain speed by coasting/ getting aero.

Endurance will come with your weight loss and saddle time. Build it slowly (incrementally). For me, key to success was consistency. You don't have to ride for hours at a time. But ride every day, if possible.

Re: being planted on the saddle, I'd suggest mixing things up a bit. I'm not an out of the saddle climber, but I do push a bit during some rides. For example, rather than cruise at a constant speed on a stretch of road, do an interval to a sign or other marker up the road. IME even getting an inch or two off the saddle for 15-20 seconds goes a long way in relieving pressure.

Some fit/ comfort related info:
- keep your upper torso relaxed, arms slightly bent
- change hand position frequently (tops, bends, hoods, drops...)
- keep a slightly loose grip on the bars (avoid the 'death grip')
- keep forearms and hands aligned (don't twist at the wrist)
- consider good quality gel gloves
 

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Congrats on a nice bike! Following plenty of folks putting 300+ miles per week on their Fuji adventure bikes.

I am of the firm belief that nearly any saddle, if the correct width and adjusted properly, can be fifty-mile+ comfortable. Adding padding just blunts the pain you are feeling from it not being fit correctly. IMO.
Millimeters make huge differences. Take pictures of the seat so you have a starting point to return to, then grab a wrench and go cycling. Make minute, minute adjustments to tilt and fore aft and get instant feedback on what feels good.

I'm a pretty heavy guy and my ass if magic-carpet comfortable on a relatively hard saddle. Standard often fits more of the bell curve then you'd like to think. I am six feet on a 134 width seat and it just disappears below my ass.

Fit, not gels, not seat covers, etc... but fit. A good start is that the seat should nearly always be level or very near level. level seat (flat seating surface) slight flare/kick up in the back to press against/cradle your sit bones as you hammer on climbs. You'll find slight changes in tilt will have great effects on lower back tension and weight on your palms.

No bibs = pain. skip the gel seat but do wear bibs/shorts.
 
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