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I have a Chorus rear derailler, 2 years old, about 9k miles, how ofter do you replace the pulleys?
 

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when the teeth get all chewed up and they dont spin anymore. Chorus uses high quality pulleys so im sure there good for thousands of miles, just clean them and lube them and you should be fine. I have thousands of miles on my dura ace rear der and the pulleys are in great shape, just cleaned the whole bike a few weeks ago and the whole rear der still looks great
 

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The teeth will get chewed up before they stop spinning freely. I have a 9 speed Chorus RD on my commuter and it has about 30K on it and the pulleys are still good. Keeping your chain reasonably clean and your RD adjusted will result in many years of pulley life. IME, the lower one is usually a hard plastic and will wear out first. The upper one is metallic in many cases and usually doesn't show much wear.
 

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Look after them

Keep your chain, rear derailleur and jockey wheels clean and you'll hardly ever have to change them. I've had a Record rear derailleur for 17 years and maybe 40 000km and haven't had to replace the wheels yet. They're almost as good as new.
 

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Piling on

As others have noted, you replace them when they are worn out and either have excess friction when they rotate or when they affect shifting. My current '98 Record pulleys have nearly 75K miles on them and they still work fine. I'm switching to 10s soon, so I won't get to find out how long they last. I do know that I had 90K miles on my '72 Nuovo Record pulleys when I sold that bike, and they were still working fine. 9K miles seems a bit premature to consider replacement, IMO.
 

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Genuinely impressive

Kerry
If you've racked up 75,000 miles in seven years on only one bike then one of the following must be true:
1. You do almost all of your riding on one bike
2. You're a pro
3. You commute fairly long distances
4. You don't have a job
5. You don't have a social life
6. You're in perpetual training for the RAAM
7. A combination of some of the above.

Which is it?
Gizzard
 

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The explanation

gizzard said:
Kerry
If you've racked up 75,000 miles in seven years on only one bike then one of the following must be true:
1. You do almost all of your riding on one bike
2. You're a pro
3. You commute fairly long distances
4. You don't have a job
5. You don't have a social life
6. You're in perpetual training for the RAAM
7. A combination of some of the above.

Which is it?
First of all, 1998 through 2005 is 8 seasons, not 7. My average annual mileage is around 9500, on one bike, not counting roller miles. While I am retired now, I ride no more than I did when I was working full time. My wife and I both ride a lot, and I worked for a company that had a schedule where you got every other Friday off. I took additional vacation such that I worked 4 days most weeks through the summer, and I used those Fridays to do long rides. My typical "in season" weekly mileage is around 350 - about 18 hours. It's pretty easy to do over 9K miles per year with that schedule. It's just a matter of setting priorities for something you like to do.
 

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Agree

Agree, it's a matter of priority and not necessarily onerous doing something because you choose to. I commute about 60 miles a day, Monday to Friday. If the weather's good I'll have a bit of a spin on Saturday and then ride long on Sunday. During the summer I'll up the mileage a bit depending on my objectives – maybe 100 miles on Wednesdays and 120 on Sundays. It's very rare for me to get on my rollers or trainer. I'd rather take the day off or brave the rain and wind; it’s quite fortunate for us in the UK that we don’t have to contend with too much snow and ice.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
First of all, 1998 through 2005 is 8 seasons, not 7. My average annual mileage is around 9500, on one bike, not counting roller miles. While I am retired now, I ride no more than I did when I was working full time. My wife and I both ride a lot, and I worked for a company that had a schedule where you got every other Friday off. I took additional vacation such that I worked 4 days most weeks through the summer, and I used those Fridays to do long rides. My typical "in season" weekly mileage is around 350 - about 18 hours. It's pretty easy to do over 9K miles per year with that schedule. It's just a matter of setting priorities for something you like to do.
I would say averaging 50 miles a day is quite amazing, regardless of how much time you have. Way to go, Kerry.
 
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