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The Edge
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How can you tell when your rims are being damaged by the brake pads other than large scoring marks. My open pros (regular black, not the ceramic) still feel like they have the original machined surface on them and they have 2000 miles on them in all weather types. I want a pad that is easier to modulate and doesn't leave so much residue on the rim. I'm thinking of going from my stock pads which lasted 5500 miles and going to some Kool Stops. What kind should I get?

I ride in steep rolling hills with lots of rainy rides. I'm thinking about getting the salmon colored Kool Stops, but how fast do they wear? Do the regular black formula Kool Stops work nearly as well in the rain? Would it leave pink streaks on my rims?
 

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chamois creme addict
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1,479 Posts
Rim wear

Pretty much what you see is what you get for rim wear. Any hard particles trapped between the rim and the pad will leave scoring in the form of a circumferential gouge. As you accumulate mileage and brake in the rain, the smaller grit particles will begin to wear the rim wall away. The sidewall will become concave, in fact after 2000 miles with some rainy rides you can probably feel some concavity if you run your finger across the sidewall of the rim. There is not much you can do about it, except replace the rim when it becomes very worn, or ride in dry weather only.

I live in the Pacific NW (or SW as I'm in Canada) and I spend a lot of time riding in the rain. My current rainy-weather rear wheel on my winter bike has a Mavic CXP23 rim that is getting very concave. I am basically riding it until it actually cracks along the braking track, just to see how long it will will survive.

If you want to extend your rim life, I fully recommend the Kool Stop pads. The salmon are the best for wet weather, but the black work fine they just wear faster and they stop better in dry weather. The KS pads will pick up much less grit than Shimano pads, which are notoriously hard on rims.
 

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..............
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Eric_H said:
I live in the Pacific NW (or SW as I'm in Canada) and I spend a lot of time riding in the rain. My current rainy-weather rear wheel on my winter bike has a Mavic CXP23 rim that is getting very concave. I am basically riding it until it actually cracks along the braking track, just to see how long it will will survive.
You might want to rethink your strategy on letting that rim wear until it cracks, particularly on the front wheel.

I had a Mavic mtb rim fail quite dramatically when the braking track finally collapsed from wear. It was on the front wheel, and fortunately it failed just after I had completed a 30+ mph fire road descent ending in a sharp hairpin turn. When it let go, it shredded the tube and tire instantly without warning. If it had happned in that curve, I would have been toast.

I sure wouldn't want to test my luck with the same scenario on the road with a 23mm tire where you have very little margin for error.

I've got a wheelset on my cross bike which is pretty severly worn. Fortuanately, the back rim wore faster than the front, so it will be the first to go. I've relegated those wheels to off-road only and I'm not overly worried about rear blowouts while off-road.
 
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