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tdiclub Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hope not...here I go.


What are the down sides of spacing out a freehub for singlespeed applications?

I can really find any aside from the asthetics. Tried it out on a campy chorus 9/10 hub laced to a campy moskva rim, works well so far.
 

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The Singlespeed forum over on MTBR is a good resource, plenty of roadies there too. Just warn them of "Roadie Content" from the get go. :D

If I am understanding your question right, aesthetics and a less dished wheel are the advantages of a SS specific wheel. (and weight?)

The advantages of simply adding spacers to a freehub is that it is cheap and you can easily fine tune your chain line.
 

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kannas said:
Hope not...here I go.


What are the down sides of spacing out a freehub for singlespeed applications?

I can really find any aside from the asthetics. Tried it out on a campy chorus 9/10 hub laced to a campy moskva rim, works well so far.
There really isn't a problem. Most flange to flange measurements are the same as track hubs so strenth isn't an issue...
 

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your text here
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unless you REALLY torque, you really dont need even dishing on a SS. you don't even really need it on a fixie if you dont torque hard. but once you start taking off from the line or stopping hard with a fixie, it helps to be centered.

i got away with a converted mtb rear wheel for a SS for about 5 years. had to check for true every month or so, but for doin it on the cheap it was fine.
 

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One thing to consider is that the above average amount ot torque that's generated on a SS is pretty hard on a freewheel/hub. You will eventually wear it out. And when it does, if you're using a BMX freewheel, on a dedicated SS wheel, you can just replace the freewheel. But if you are using a converted freehub, you'll have to replace the entire hub.
 
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