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Williams Cycling recently released a video (https://youtu.be/1oghom9-JiQ) where the founder talks about why they went to j-bend spokes instead of straight pull. He claims that j-bend stays true longer because when the spokes get de-tensioned the straight pull turns in the hub easier. I kinda believe that, but it sounds like a bad fix for having low spoke tension on the build. Don't j-bend spokes also become untrue when the tension gets low and the nipples spin in the nipple?

Thoughts?
 

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No.

Well designed/built wheels stay true longer.

^^^This^^^

I also fail to see the logic that if the hub end of the spoke turns, that will cause the wheel to come out of true. It is the unthreading of the nipples, which can happen whether the hub end of the spoke can turn or not.

I have owned factory wheelsets with straight pull spokes and while I have had other problems with them, after a few thousand miles, they were still as true as the day they were new.....that is until the broken spoke happened! :eek:
 

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.....................
I also fail to see the logic that if the hub end of the spoke turns, that will cause the wheel to come out of true. It is the unthreading of the nipples, which can happen whether the hub end of the spoke can turn or not.
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There is logic to that statement. The turning of the hub end of the spoke causes the spoke to twist which then could cause the nipple to unscrew as the spoke loads and unloads.
Keeping spoke windup at check during tensioning is a major drawback not worth the few grams you save on the straight pull hub weight, at least for me.
 

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Wheels built with J-bend spokes will break spokes more often than wheel with straight pull spokes. The bend is where the J-bend spokes break.

Wheels with J-bend spokes are easy to fix, when you break a spoke. Everyone carries J-bend spokes in different sizes and lengths.
 

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There is logic to that statement. The turning of the hub end of the spoke causes the spoke to twist which then could cause the nipple to unscrew as the spoke loads and unloads.
Keeping spoke windup at check during tensioning is a major drawback not worth the few grams you save on the straight pull hub weight, at least for me.
OK DC, I stand corrected on the twist issue. :)

I thought the main advantage of straight pull spokes was that eliminates the weakness at the j-bend, not any significant weight savings.
 
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My experience doesn't prove the opposite is true but it hints at it. Had some old DA wheels with only 20/16 spokes that were half straight pull in the back and all straight pull in the front.
There might be other factors, like the rim being over built, but they stayed true after some serious long term beating that I'd never try to get away with using the same number of J bend spokes.
 

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OK DC, I stand corrected on the twist issue. :)

I thought the main advantage of straight pull spokes was that eliminates the weakness at the j-bend, not any significant weight savings.
A straight pull hub saves about 100 grams because it does not have any flanges and thus makes a 1500 gram wheel 1400 gram and as you know 1400 gram is "god" in wheels :mad2:

They dont give a rat's arse about spokes breaking at the j bend, which should only be an issue in the short term if the wheel is not properly built to begin with. Eventually everything will fail, including the wheel, the hubs, the spokes, etc. however a high quality wheel should give you at least 15k trouble free miles and considerably more if you periodically inspect and adjust it.
 

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Wheels built with J-bend spokes will break spokes more often than wheel with straight pull spokes. The bend is where the J-bend spokes break.
Old wive's tale that's been debunked. Once properly cold worked and stress relieved, a J bend spoke is no more likely to break than a straight pull. There plenty of cases of straight pull spokes breaking at the head. Both are cold worked to shape from straight wire. Both need to be stress relieved to extend their service life. That and sufficient tension to prevent spokes from going slack.
 

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I don't know of too many hubs that have an equivalent flange and straight-pull option, but a pair of DT240s flanged hubs is 4g more than the equivalent straight pull 240s. There are also bracing angle ramifications for straight pull, and you are generally locked in to a specific lacing pattern (not that I think the latter counts for a whole lot, but it's there).

Otherwise, I'd just like to add a "+1" to each of Ergott's posts on this thread.
 

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I don't know of too many hubs that have an equivalent flange and straight-pull option, but a pair of DT240s flanged hubs is 4g more than the equivalent straight pull 240s. There are also bracing angle ramifications for straight pull, and you are generally locked in to a specific lacing pattern (not that I think the latter counts for a whole lot, but it's there).

Otherwise, I'd just like to add a "+1" to each of Ergott's posts on this thread.
I am referring to the Williams video referred to in the OP's post. Per William (minute 1:21 of the clip), the William's straight pull hub is 100 grams lighter than their flanged j-bend hub and that makes their wheel 1400 gr from 1500 grams
 

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Sorry, I didn't watch the video. My bad. Taking 100g out of a hub is a b---- on wheels. That's a surprising amount of weight to get out of just a set of flanges.

There is an awful lot of stuff on the internet, though, isn't there?

Would still like to add a +1 to Ergott's posts.
 

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A straight pull hub saves about 100 grams because it does not have any flanges and thus makes a 1500 gram wheel 1400 gram and as you know 1400 gram is "god" in wheels :mad2:
I'd really like to lose about 10lbs. off my engine. I'm sure that would make WAY more difference than 100g. :D


They dont give a rat's arse about spokes breaking at the j bend, which should only be an issue in the short term if the wheel is not properly built to begin with.
True.

Eventually everything will fail, including the wheel, the hubs, the spokes, etc. however a high quality wheel should give you at least 15k trouble free miles and considerably more if you periodically inspect and adjust it.
At 15K miles, a wheel doesn't owe me anything.
 

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