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i read somewhere recently about roadies stashing a favorite cork (champagne, wine, beer, etc.) somewhere on their bike. in 20 years of riding i had never heard of this, let alone noticed a cork on anybody's bike.

any corkers out there? where do you stash the cork?
 

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duh...
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team_sheepshead said:
i read somewhere recently about roadies stashing a favorite cork (champagne, wine, beer, etc.) somewhere on their bike. in 20 years of riding i had never heard of this, let alone noticed a cork on anybody's bike.

any corkers out there? where do you stash the cork?

A champagne cork might make a good bar end cap.
 

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n00bsauce
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I corked my fork when I had loose ball headsets, especially on the rain bike. In fact, I think the cork is still in my '85 Cannondale R400 that is now a SS. I'll check at lunch time.
 

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Call me a Fred
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I'ved used corks as bar plugs for years. The are the correct size and do a good job. They seem to stay in place better than the plastic plugs do. I am using plastic plugs now, but if one fell out, I would insert a cork as a replacement.
 

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yep in the end of one of my bar ends

fits fine and i seem to always have one around or am 4 glasses away from one
jim
 

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One year a bunch of racing friends and myself had rented a condo in Vermont for the Killington Stage Race. The morning of the first stage, I discovered that one of my handlebar plugs had come out and gotten lost. They won't let you race if your handlebars are plugged, so I had to find a replacement. No one in the house had a spare, but someone had drunk a bottle of wine the night before, and I quickly discovered that the cork was a perfect fit for the handlebar. I popped it in, and as they say, I was off to the races!
 

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Mel Erickson said:
I corked my fork when I had loose ball headsets, especially on the rain bike. In fact, I think the cork is still in my '85 Cannondale R400 that is now a SS. I'll check at lunch time.
What does the headset have to do with a cork in the steerer? Water inside the steerer can't get to the headset - water gets into headsets from outside the steerer, not inside.

In fact, corking the bottom of a steel fork on a rain bike is probably a bad idea - it allows water that does manage to get into the steerer to pool inside rather than drain out. A pool of water in the steerer is a recipe for rusting out the most critical tube on the bike.
 

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n00bsauce
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It was a popular thing to do back in the70's and 80's. The thought was that water splashed up by the tire would get into the headset, steerer tube and/or fork blades and start rust (steel forks you know). I'm not sure how it would get into the headset from the steerer but that was the conventional wisdom so we did it. I'm sure I'm not the only one. I checked at lunch and I either took it out or it fell out (probably dried out and fell out) 'cause it's not there. Give me a break, would ya, that was 20-30 years ago when I was young and foolish.
 

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grippy...
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balvenie scotch

cork with wood cap, perfect for plugging the handlebar ends
 

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Shirtcocker
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Are we talking 6/4 ot 3.25 Ti corks here? You gotta be worried about stuctural integrity when it comes to corks folks.
 

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Mel Erickson said:
It was a popular thing to do back in the70's and 80's. The thought was that water splashed up by the tire would get into the headset, steerer tube and/or fork blades and start rust (steel forks you know). I'm not sure how it would get into the headset from the steerer but that was the conventional wisdom so we did it. I'm sure I'm not the only one. I checked at lunch and I either took it out or it fell out (probably dried out and fell out) 'cause it's not there. Give me a break, would ya, that was 20-30 years ago when I was young and foolish.
Yep, lots of people used to do this.
 

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remodeling...me
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Adrenalina Italiana
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dates back to at least the 20's

In the days of old,when bike riders were bold,
and a fixed gear was all they'd need,
with lots of torque they attached a cork,
and rode away with speed.

When a cork was popped,power was released,bubbles escaped.So dropping your cork or having no more cork means your out of it,flat,dead,no more stuff.Ergo, the racers would hang a cork on their bikes,so they would never be "out" of cork.

Also, you can use them,as others have mentioned,for barplugs,also used forthe bottom of the fork crown.Dirt and moisture were kept out.Light,inexpensive,and effective.
 

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team_sheepshead said:
i read somewhere recently about roadies stashing a favorite cork (champagne, wine, beer, etc.) somewhere on their bike. in 20 years of riding i had never heard of this, let alone noticed a cork on anybody's bike.

any corkers out there? where do you stash the cork?
I have a cork in my seat tube. It's there to hold the medical supplies in there. It keeps that stuff completely safe from falling out and it's _ALWAYS_ there even if I'm going for a quick jaunt around the neighborhoodl with a bagless bike.
 
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